Positively Pregnant : Pregnancy Testing for H igh Risk Adolescents in Non-Traditional Locations

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Positively Pregnant : Pregnancy Testing for H igh Risk Adolescents in Non-Traditional Locations. Jennifer A. Oliphant, EdD, Danielle LeVasseur , BS, Annie-Laurie McRee, DrPH , Kara Beckman, MA, Shari Plowman, MPH, Renee Sieving, RN, PhD - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Text of Positively Pregnant : Pregnancy Testing for H igh Risk Adolescents in Non-Traditional Locations

Coffee, Cola, and a Pee Cup: Using Technology to Measure and Report Pregnancy in Non-Traditional Settings

Positively Pregnant: Pregnancy Testing for High Risk Adolescents in Non-Traditional LocationsJennifer A. Oliphant, EdD, Danielle LeVasseur, BS, Annie-Laurie McRee, DrPH, Kara Beckman, MA, Shari Plowman, MPH, Renee Sieving, RN, PhDDivision of Adolescent Health and Medicine, Medical School, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota

Jennifer Oliphant, EdD, MPHNo relationships to disclosePresenter DisclosersTo determine the acceptability and feasibility of urine pregnancy testing (UPT) in community-based settings

To explore adolescents preferred methods for receiving UPT results

Project PurposeWhile pregnancy is commonly assessed via self-report, adolescents may not report pregnancy accurately or consistently over time

Incorporating biomarkers, such as UPT, has the potential to reduce bias and error in detecting pregnancy

Very limited past research on community-based UPT

Why?

Pilot study Involved young women ages 16-20 years (n=28)

Participants at high risk for unintended pregnancyConstituted a subset of enrolled in a teen pregnancy prevention intervention study

Semi-structured qualitative interviews Individual interviews addressed comfort with UPT in various community locations, preferences for receiving UPT results

Project Design & Methods5Qualitative Interview Content

19 of 28 participants (68%) provided a urine sample for pregnancy testingRapid pregnancy tests on urine samples

Interviews recorded, transcribed & content analyzed

Project Design & Methods

All participants who provided a urine sample (68%) did so at a fast food restaurant, coffee shop, or library

Participants said that teens would be willing to provide urine samples if given a clear explanation of why the sample was needed

Results

Context & privacy paramount in whether teens would participate in community-based UPT

Participants preferred to learn about UPT results by phone or in person

Terms negative & positive confused participants; suggest using pregnant or not pregnant when sharing test result

ResultsWith positive test results, participants suggested providing resources for pregnancy options, clinic referrals

With negative test results, some participants suggested providing birth control information

ResultsSharing UPT ResultsPositive ResultsNegative ResultsIn person 100%In person 100%Phone 88%Phone 100%Voicemail 65%Facebook message 78%Facebook message 40%Voicemail 65%Text message 37%Text message 63%Email 33%Email 60%Letter 33%Letter 50%Community-based UPT is both feasible and acceptable among adolescent females at high risk for unintended pregnancy Incorporating a biomarker into community-based interventions is a promising way to improve pregnancy measurement and prevention efforts

Further, larger studies are needed

ConclusionThank you. What questions do you have?This study was supported by the National Institute of Nursing Research (5R01-NR008778) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (T01-DP000112). The views presented do not necessarily reflect those of the funders. The Prime Time study would not have been possible without the cooperation and contributions of the young women, clinics, and research staff involved with this project.

Jenny Oliphant, EdD, MPHDivision of Adolescent Health and Medicine, Medical School, University of Minnesotaoliph001@umn.eduContact Information