New Hampshire Story of Transformation

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New Hampshire is transforming its K-12 education sector, leveraging new technologies to become a model of next generation learning. Read about their story of transformation here.

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  • NEW HAMPSHIRE:

    OUR STORY OF TRANSFORMATION 2014

  • I F C

  • INTRO

    IMPETUS: NOT GOOD ENOUGH VISION & VALUES

    EMBRACING COMPETENCIES

    SUPPORTING TEACHERS

    LEVERAGING STAKEHOLDERS

    INTEGRATING THE SYSTEM

    EXAMPLES OF PROGRESS

    LESSONS LEARNED

    QUESTIONS & CHALLENGES

    TRACKING PROGRESS

    CONCLUSION

    I F C

    TABLE OF CONTENTS

  • WE ALL KNOW THE GROUND IS SHIFTING BENEATH OUR FEET, THE WORLD IS CHANGING AND OUR SCHOOLS NEED TO AS WELL. WE IN NEW HAMPSHIRE HAVE

  • RECOGNIZED THAT FOR A WHILE AND WE ARE FOCUSING ON TRANSFORMING INSTRUCTION BY EMPOWERING STUDENTS AND EDUCATORS.

  • In New Hampshire, we see education as a critical driver for both the economic development of aour state and the underpinnings of our democracy. Neither is truly possible unless we invest in a 21st century system of education, from birth through adult. We are clear that the knowledge economy will not wait for our students if they are not prepared with the right mix of the knowledge, skills and dispositions.

    Our local communities matter deeply here, so we have come to see the role of the New Hampshire Department of Education (NHDOE) as one of support for improving and innovating within districts rather than as an arbiter of those

    efforts. This publication represents our states collective storyone of the successes and struggles to transform an entire education system in a way that is done from the bottom up rather than the top downto promote ownership that can result in real and lasting change.

    The fabric of our education system is knitted together with many hands: strong leaders, teachers and families who are on the frontlines and demand the best for our young people. Elected officials who understand and help drive the development of policy to support this shift. Our business community, which recognizes that success is inextricably linked to investing in our schools. The higher education institutions that work tirelessly to prepare our learners for success in the workplace. The education partnerships both locally and nationally that help us design and support our vision. Successful transformation of our system is not feasible without the aligned contribution of all of these voices, but as you can imagine that effort is complex.

    This publication is a space to share and synthesize this complexity; to reflect on our hard fought accomplishments and lessons learned as we hold steady to the belief that only through clarity of purpose and aligned vision will we continue to dramatically improve the outcomes for all of our students.

    EDUCATION IS A CRITICAL DRIVER FOR BOTH THE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT OF OUR STATE AND THE UNDERPINNINGS OF OUR DEMOCRACY.

    We chose to tell this story in a way that models the transformation we seekmultiple modalities rich with diverse opportunities to not only read, watch and listen, but also apply the material, data and artifacts to your own work. We also recognize that we all digest content differently today, and therefore this publication

    was designed to let you consume information on different levels, based on interest. Additionally, as a state moving towards competency-based learning system-wide, this publication offers a series of evidences of work throughout our state to demonstrate the progress and good work.

  • 4OUR STORY OF TRANSFORMATION

    population:

    316,128,839population (2013):

    1,323,459

    # school age children:

    49,600,000# school age children (5-17)

    208,887

    94.4% white1.4% Black

    2.4% Asian

    3.0% Hispanic

    77.9%white

    13.1% Black

    5.1% Asian

    16.9% Hispanic

    Ethnic GroupsEthnic Groups

    populationgrowth:

    0.22%

    medianhousehold

    income

    $64,925

    populationgrowth:

    0.75%

    medianhousehold

    income

    $53,046

    15.6%

    22.6%

    20%

    27%

    child poverty

    rate

    % children (0-5) in

    low-income working families

    TITLE FOR INFOGRAPHIC HERE

  • THE FIRST CHALLENGE OF LEADERSHIP IS TO BE WILLING TO MAKE DIFFICULT DECISIONS WHILE THEY STILL HAVE THE POTENTIAL TO SHAPE FUTURE OUTCOMES.

    THE IMPETUS FOR CHANGEWhile New Hampshire has historically been a top performer in the country, as evidenced by comparatively high graduation rates from high school and standardized exams (such as the NAEP and SAT), the state has not been content to rest on its laurels. Rather, there been a growing dissatisfaction with the system on the part of educational leaders and the business community. Over the past decade, this has manifested itself as a growing move toward competency-based system.

    REASONS TO INNOVATE

    An outdated model. Our traditional learning model values time instead of mastery. We care that our students have learnedthrough a variety of personalized methods, not bound by the classroom wallsand can show evidence of their learning through authentic assessments and move on when ready. Higher education and workforce needs: By 2018, 64 percent of our states

    jobs will require post-secondary

    education making it even more critical

    that we create pathways from our K-12

    schools to our community colleges and

    university system.

    Over the next 10 years, nearly two-thirds of job opportunities in New

    Hampshire will come from replacement

    needs from retirement or workers who

    have changed occupations.

    Healthcare will be one of our fastest growing job markets. An estimated one out of every nine

    workers will be in the healthcare field.

    For every 100 bachelors degrees produced annually in New Hampshire, 86 degree holders ages 22-64 enter the state and

    78 people ages 22-64 with bachelors

    degrees leave making a net gain of 8

    degrees per 10018. That means we need

    to continue to work together to create

    jobs and opportunities for our young,

    educated workforce.

    While New Hampshire has historically been a top performer in the country, as evidenced by comparatively high graduation rates from high school and standardized exams (such as the NAEP and SAT), the state has not been content to rest on its laurels. Rather, there been a growing dissatisfaction with the system on the part of educational leaders and the business community. Over the past decade, this has manifested itself as a growing move toward

  • KEY EVENTS IN OUR HISTORY TO SUPPORT A SHIFT

    6OUR STORY OF TRANSFORMATION

    Interest in credentialing learning, particularly within the business sector.1

    New Hampshire launches a competency-based education pilot in 27 high schools.2

    We enact a change to the Minimum Standards for School Approval stating that competencies must be implemented by 2008.3

    Awarded the National Governors Associations (NGA) Supporting Student Success (S3) grant4, which allocates $50K for integrating expanded learning opportunities (ELO) into state education reform agendas5. With the funds, New Hampshire piloted a program that gave high school students an opportunity to earn credit for taking part in ELOs, which led to a reduction in the dropout rate among participating students6.

    1995

    98

    04

    07

    05

    06

    08

    10

    11

    2013

    05

    New Hampshire changed the compulsory age in which students must stay in school from 16 to 189, which made a signicant impact on the dropout rate statewidein the 2011-12 school year dropout rates were 1.26% compared to the national average TKTK10.

    08

    NESSC Policy Framework for Prociency Based Graduation11. In 2010, Maine, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont passed joint resolutions of support for the New England Secondary School Consortium (NESSC), a partnership working to develop innovations in the design and implementation of secondary education12.

    10

    NHDOE convened a task force in order to design a clear vision for a fair and equitable teacher evaluation system, and produced the Phase I Report13.

    11

    New Hampshire Task Force on Effective Teaching Phase II Report. The Phase II task force was convened to implement the Phase I Report by designing a practical approach to teacher evaluation14.

    13

    ESEA Flexibility Waiver15. New Hampshire took advantage of the U.S. Department of Educations invitation to request exibility pertaining to specic requirements of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001. In exchange, New Hampshire must develop and implement comprehensive initiatives designed to improve education within the state16.

    13

    Review of the Minimum Standards for School Approval, which did TKTK17. 13

    06

    Nellie Mae Education Foundation Extended Learning Pilot7. Four ELO pilot sites were given substantial nancial support and technical assistance in order to develop comprehensive programs designed to provide all students with the opportunity to participate in an ELO project8.

    10

    07

    95

    04-98

  • Nationally, New Hampshire has been and continues to be an eective system of learning when compared with other states, but that doesnt mean were prepared to rest on our laurels.

    High School Graduation Rate in 2010

    86.3%New Hampshire1

    78.2%National Average2

    Four Year College Graduation Rate11

    62%New Hampshire

    39%National Average

    In 2012, New Hampshires dropout rate was

    1.2%3 7%4compared to the national rate of

    Why? In 2008, New Hampshire changed the compulsory age of schooling from 16 to 185, making a significant impact on the dropout rate statewide. One year after legislation, dropout rates decreased from 2.5%6 to 1.7%7.

    A Look at Standardized Tests

    1498

    266 284

    Reading8

    296

    Math9

    1567

    Combined SAT Scores (YEAR)

    8th Grade NAEP Scores (2013)

    For more SAT scores, click here.

    Four-year college or universityOther than a four-year collegeArmed Forces

    Employed

    Unemployed

    Unknown

    Post-graduation plans for New Hampshire high school seniors10

    $33,390$29,423

    $42,768$38,607

    High School Graduates

    Associates Degree

    $51,322$50,360

    BachelorsDegree

    $66,039$68,064

    Graduate or Professional Degree

    Average Income Across Education Levels18

    For every 100 bachelors degrees produced annually in New Hampshire, 86 degree holders ages 22-64 enter the state

    78 people ages 22-64 with bachelors degrees leave making a net gain of 8 degrees per 100&

    From 2010 to 2020, total employment in NH is expected to grow by 10.4%, an estimated increase of 662,146 to 730,710 jobs. Projected growth for the U.S. is 14.3%13.

    Construction jobs are expected to grow 25%, with over 5,300 jobs added.14

    An estimated one out of every nine workers will be in the healthcare field.15

    Over the next 10 years, nearly 66% of job opportunities in NH will come from replacing retirees or those who changed careers.16

    By 2018, 64% of Hew Hampshires jobs will require post-secondary education.17$106,490Management

    $77,070Healthcare

    $35,760Production

    $21,990Food Service

    $38,330Sales & Related

    $34,620Office & Admin

    $47,520Education, Training & Library

    Top Industries in New Hampshire & Mean Annual Wage12

    The Future of Jobs

    26%31%

    Children and TeensOverweight or Obese19

    7.1%8.1%

    Low Birth Weight Rate20

    7.1%8.1%

    2008 teen birth rate per 1,000 births21

    Our Childrens Health

    WHY GOOD ENOUGH IS NOT GOOD ENOUGH

  • Nationally, New Hampshire has been and continues to be an eective system of learning when compared with other states, but that doesnt mean were prepared to rest on our laurels.

    High School Graduation Rate in 2010

    86.3%New Hampshire1

    78.2%National Average2

    Four Year College Graduation Rate11

    62%New Hampshire

    39%National Average

    In 2012, New Hampshires dropout rate was

    1.2%3 7%4compared to the national rate of

    Why? In 2008, New Hampshire changed the compulsory age of schooling from 16 to 185, making a significant impact on the dropout rate statewide. One year after legislation, dropout rates decreased from 2.5%6 to 1.7%7.

    A Look at Standardized Tests

    1498

    266 284

    Reading8

    296

    Math9

    1567

    Combined SAT Scores (YEAR)

    8th Grade NAEP Scores (2013)

    For more SAT scores, click here.

    Four-year college or universityOther than a four-year collegeArmed Forces

    Employed

    Unemployed

    Unknown

    Post-graduation plans for New Hampshire high school seniors10

    $33,390$29,423

    $42,768$38,607

    High School Graduates

    Associates Degree

    $51,322$50,360

    BachelorsDegree

    $66,039$68,064

    Graduate or Professional Degree

    Average Income Across Education Levels18

    For every 100 bachelors degrees produced annually in New Hampshire, 86 degree holders ages 22-64 enter the state

    78 people ages 22-64 with bachelors degrees leave making a net gain of 8 degrees per 100&

    From 2010 to 2020, total employment in NH is expected to grow by 10.4%, an estimated increase of 662,146 to 730,710 jobs. Projected growth for the U.S. is 14.3%13.

    Construction jobs are expected to grow 25%, with over 5,300 jobs added.14

    An estimated one out of every nine workers will be in the healthcare field.15

    Over the next 10 years, nearly 66% of job opportunities in NH will come from replacing retirees or those who changed careers.16

    By 2018, 64% of Hew Hampshires jobs will require post-secondary education.17$106,490Management

    $77,070Healthcare

    $35,760Production

    $21,990Food Service

    $38,330Sales & Related

    $34,620Office & Admin

    $47,520Education, Training & Library

    Top Industries in New Hampshire & Mean Annual Wage12

    The Future of Jobs

    26%31%

    Children and TeensOverweight or Obese19

    7.1%8.1%

    Low Birth Weight Rate20

    7.1%8.1%

    2008 teen birth rate per 1,000 births21

    Our Childrens Health

    8OUR STORY OF TRANSFORMATION

    WHY GOOD ENOUGH IS NOT GOOD ENOUGH

  • OUR VISION FOR EDUCATION IN THE GRANITE STATE One of the most important things we have done as a state is to anchor the change we seek against our values. These four values are what we collectively need to be aiming towards, supporting, designing, innovating and measuring to create the learning New Hampshire wants and needs.

    The future of personalized, competency-based learning in New Hampshire. Deputy Commissioner Paul Leather talks about the next steps on the competency journey.

    FOUR

    VAL

    UES

    1Our children deserve a personalized, competency-based learning environment that lets them move on when ready. 2Our educators deserve and need high quality, ongoing support. 3Local is our driver of change. Our communities must be the leaders of the transformation we seek. 4We need a seamless system of collaboration amidst the stages of a persons lifestarting from early childhood to K-12, post-secondary and our workforce.

  • Watch Fred Bramante talk through the history of competencies.

    VALUE ONE: EMBRACING COMPETENCYOur children deserve a personalized, competency-based learning environment that lets them move on when ready.Competency-based learning fundamentally shifts the learning experience. From a policy standpoint, it means that our schools are not bound by the Carnegie Unit to illustrate student learning. What does that look like? In a traditional, Carnegie-based environment, a student might receive a D in middle school language artsthat D could mean many things: perhaps the student missed a lot of class because of family trouble and therefore didnt hand in classwork or homework and that lowered their grade significantly; or maybe they really struggled with an element of literacy and writing. That student might have mastered some components of the class, but the D doesnt leave much room for understanding the students proficiencies and b...