Modelling the Microphysical Sensitivities of Storm Dynamics Tim Baker Supervisors: Peter Knippertz & Alan Blyth

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  • Modelling the Microphysical Sensitivities of Storm Dynamics Tim Baker Supervisors: Peter Knippertz & Alan Blyth
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  • Background Graduated from University of Leeds 2010 with BSc in Environmental Science. Dissertation: Modelling air flow over partially forested hillsides. Summer 2010: Working for Ian Brooks doing data analysis and quality control.
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  • Part of the DIAMET (DIAbatic influence on Mesoscale structures in ExTratropical storms) project. Consortium of Universities of Leeds, Manchester, Reading, East Anglia with NCAS and NCEO along with the Met Office as project partners. Aims: Increase understanding and predictability of mesoscale features within extratropical cyclones DIAMET
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  • Extratropical storms cause large scale disruption and damage to people and property. Can forecast well on the synoptic scale but precise locations and timings of mesoscale structures are far less certain. Improve microphysical parameterisation schemes for NWP models. Why study this?
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  • Use case studies which exhibit mesoscale features where microphysics may be important in their formation. Collect data using the FAAM BAe-146 aircraft including dropsondes, winds, turbulence and microphysics. WRF modelling with different microphysics schemes and compare to UM results. Plan Flight path images courtesy of Dr Jeff Chagnon, Uni. of Reading.
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  • Thanks Any Questions?