Mighty Peace Teachers’ Convention 2014 Vocabulary Acquisition

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  • Mighty Peace Teachers Convention 2014 Vocabulary Acquisition
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  • For further conversation about any of these topics: Rick Wormeli rwormeli@cox.net 703-620-2447 Herndon, Virginia, USA (Eastern Standard Time Zone) Twitter: @RickWormeli
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  • Why English is Hard to Learn (Author Unknown) The bandage was wound around the wound. The farm was used to produce produce. The dump was so full that it had to refuse more refuse. We must polish the Polish furniture. He could lead if he would get the lead out. The soldier decided to desert his dessert in the desert. Since there is no time like the present, he thought it was time to present the present. A bass was painted on the head of the bass drum. I did not object to the object. The insurance was invalid for the invalid. They were too close to the door to close it. The buck does funny things when the does are present. A seamstress and a sewer fell down into a sewer line. To help with planting, the farmer taught his sow to sow. The wind was too strong to wind the sail. After a number of injections my jaw got number. Upon seeing the tear in the painting I shed a tear. I had to subject the subject to a series of tests. The Native American took a bow after tying a bow in the string of his bow.
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  • q c d p Which letter does not belong, and why?
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  • long-cultivated dislikes and resentments, combined with a general expectation of coming apocalypse. He talked about these topics in a manner that managed to be tight-lipped and loquacious at the same time. Ian Frazier, New Yorker, 22 & 29 Dec. 2003 (as quoted in Merriam Webster On-Line Dictionary)
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  • Loquacious Synonyms talkative, voluble, communicative, expansive, garrulous, unreserved, chatty, gossipy, gossiping, blabby, chatty, conversational, gabby, garrulous, talkative, motormouthed, mouthy, talky, demonstrative, effusive, gushing; free- spoken, outspoken, articulate, fluent, glib, well-spoken, long-winded, verbose, windy, wordy So, what does it mean? Tending to talk a great deal; talkative.
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  • The single best way to boost students vocabulary: Increase their time spent reading. Make reading inviting, compelling, transformative.
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  • For great ideas on how to make reading motivating to students: Check out the work of: Kelly Gallagher, Donalyn Miller, Ruth Culhum, Cris Tovani, Steven Layne, Kylene Beers For research behind this idea, check out the work of Steve Krashen
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  • Its the same with writing, too: Increased time spent writing means increased vocabulary acquisition. Great new book on students writing conversations: The Best-Kept Teaching Secret by Daniels and Daniels (2013)
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  • To a person uninstructed in natural history, his country or seaside stroll is a walk through a gallery filled with wonderful works of art, nine-tenths of which have their faces turned to the wall. -- Thomas Huxley, 1854
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  • Expertise aids metaphor genesis and understanding. Chance favors the prepared mind. -- Pasteur Put another way:
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  • Chess masters can store over 100,000 different patterns of pieces in long term memory. Chess players get good by playing thousands of games! Experts think in relationships, patterns, chunks, novices keep things individual pieces. Physics experiment in categorization Solid learning comes from when students make the connections, not when we tell them about those connections.
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  • The Brains Dilemna: What Input to Keep, and What Input to Discard? Survival Familiarity/Context Priming Intensity Emotional Content Movement Novelty -- Summarized from Pat Wolfes Brain Matters, 2001
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  • Priming means we show students: 1)What they will get out of the experience (the objectives) 2)What they will encounter as they go through the experience (itinerary, structure) Prime the brain prior to asking students to do any learning experience.
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  • .which one is more loquacious? Hmm. I wonder
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  • Journalistic vs. Encyclopedic Writing The breathing of Benbows pit is deafening, like up-close jet engines mixed with a cosmic belch. Each new breath from the volcano heaves the air so violently my ears pop in the changing pressure then the temperature momentarily soars. Somewhere not too far below, red-hot, pumpkin size globs of ejected lava are flying through the air. -- National Geographic, November 2000, p. 54
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  • A volcano is a vent in the Earth from which molten rock (magma) and gas erupt. The molten rock that erupts from the volcano (lava) forms a hill or mountain around the vent. Lava may flowout as viscous liquid, or it may explode from the vent as solid or liquid particles -- Global Encyclopedia, Vol. 19 T-U-V, p. 627
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  • With hocked gems financing him, Our hero bravely defied all scornful laughter That tried to prevent his scheme. Your eyes deceive, he had said; An egg, not a table Correctly typifies this unexplored planet. Now three sturdy sisters sought proof, Forging along sometimes through calm vastness Yet more often over turbulent peaks and valleys. Days became weeks, As many doubters spread Fearful rumors about the edge. At last from nowhere Welcome winged creatures appeared Signifying momentous success. -- Dooling and Lachman (1971) pp. 216-222
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  • Creating Background Where There is None Tell the story of the Code of Hammurabi before discussing the Magna Charta. Before studying the detailed rules of baseball, play baseball. Before reading about how microscopes work, play with micros copes. Before reading the Gettysburg Address, inform students that Lincoln was dedicating a cemetery.
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  • Creating Background Where There is None Before reading a book about a military campaign or a murder mystery with references to chess, play Chess with a student in front of the class, or teach them the basic rules, get enough boards, and ask the class to play. In math, we might remind students of previous patterns as they learn new ones. Before teaching students factorization, we ask them to review what they know about prime numbers. In English class, ask students, How is this storys protagonist moving in a different direction than the last storys protagonist? In science, ask students, Weve seen how photosynthesis reduces carbon dioxide to sugars and oxidizes water into oxygen, so what do you think the reverse of this process called, respiration, does?
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  • Important for all ages when moving content into long-term memory: Students have to do both, Access Sense-Making Process Meaning-Making
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  • Word Morphology: Teach Prefixes, Roots, and Suffixes! Mal badly, poor Meta beyond, after, change Mis incorrect, bad Mono one Multi many Neo new Non not Ob, of, op, oc toward, against Oct eight Paleo ancient Para beside, almost Penta five Per throughout, completely Peri around Poly many Post after Pre before Pseudo false
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  • Proficient Readers Aoccdrnig to rseerach at an Elingsh uinervtisy, it deosnt mttaer in what order the ltteers in a word are, the olny iprmoetnt tihnh is that the frist and lsat ltteer is in the rghit pclae. The rset can be a total mses and you can still raed it outhit a porbelm. This is bcuseae we do not raed ervey letetr by itslef, but the word as a wlohe. -- Sousa, p. 62
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  • Some Great Silver Bullets from Janet Allen: Vocabulary development is directly proportional to time spent reading. Three avenues to effective vocabulary instruction: integration, repetition, and meaningful use. (Nagy et al., 1988) Teach no more than 8 to 10 new words outside of reading per week. Dont ask students to write sentences with the vocabulary terms until theyve studied them in depth.
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  • Use words over and over in natural flow of conversation model, model, model normalize their use. Have students practice saying the words even choral recitation just to visualize themselves saying it. Definition approach is ineffective by itself. (Baumann and Kameenui, 1991) Relying solely on context clues is often ineffective, but knowing the definition with context clues can be very effective. (Baumann and Kameenui, 1991)
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  • Concept Ladder (J.W. Gillet, C. Temple, 1986, as described in Inside Words, Janet Allen) Concept: Causes of: Effects of: Language associated with: Words that mean the same as: Historical examples: Contemporary examples: Evidence of: Literature connections made:
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  • Dr. Janet Allen High School Superlative: Most Likely to Be Loquacious with Vocabulary Ideas
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  • Word Link 1.Each student gets a word. 2.In partners, students share the link(s) between their individual words. 3.Partner team joins another partner team, forming a word cluster. 4.All four students identify the links among their words and share those links with the class. -- Yopp, Ruth Helen. Word Links: A Strategy for Developing Word Knowledge, Voices in the Middle, Vol. 15, Number 1, September 2007, National Council Teachers of English
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  • Great Vocabulary Acquisition Ideas Shape spellings Restaurant Menu W