LESSON 16: COMPOUND SENTENCES - Amazon S3 Diagramming Compound Sentences You¢â‚¬â„¢re going to love how

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    LESSON 16: COMPOUND SENTENCES Relevant Review

    • Coordinating Conjunctions = for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so • Do you remember how to diagram compound prepositions, verb phrases,

    adjectives, adverbs, subjects, verbs, and direct objects? (If not, review lessons 13-15.)

    Lesson

    Now it's time to diagram compound sentences.

    That means you’ll be diagramming two or more independent clauses* joined by a coordinating conjunction.

    * A clause is a group of words that contains a subject and a verb. There are two main types of clauses: independent and dependent. Independent clauses express complete thoughts and can stand all alone as complete ideas. They are basically sentences, which is what we have been studying all along. We’ll learn more about clauses starting in lesson 26.

    Here are some examples of compound sentences. I’ll give you one example for each coordinating conjunction.

    Coordinating Conjunction

    Compound Sentence

    for I felt sleepy, for I had not slept in days.

    and I ate chicken for dinner, and Joe ate pizza.

    nor I did not want to sleep, nor did I want to rest.

    but I want to play at the park, but my brother wants to play at home.

    or Dad can pick you up, or you can take the bus.

    yet I was tired, yet I was happy.

    so It was dinner time, so I cooked a fabulous meal.

    Did you notice that each example is just one sentence, but each sentence contains two independent clauses? There is an independent clause on either side of each coordinating conjunction.

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    Diagramming Compound Sentences

    You’re going to love how easy it is to diagram compound sentences.

    Diagram one independent clause on top of the other and place the conjunction on a dotted vertical line connecting the two diagrams on the left side.

    I ate chicken for dinner, and Joe ate pizza.

    Notice that the first independent clause is I ate chicken for dinner. Start by diagramming that first clause.

    The next clause is Joe ate pizza. Again, this is an independent clause that can stand all alone as a complete idea.

    Diagram it below the first clause.

    Finally, connect the two diagrams with a dotted vertical line. Place the coordinating conjunction on that line.

    If the conjunction joins more than two independent clauses, stack all of the clauses on top of each other and connect them with the coordinating conjunction.

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    Lesson 16 Sentence Diagramming Exercises

    1. Kristy cleaned the garage, and Ben raked the leaves.

    Key

    Kristy cleaned the garage, and Ben raked the leaves.

    compound sentence – statement

    Kristy cleaned the garage, Ben raked the leaves

    independent clauses

    and coordinating conjunction

    Kristy subject (noun)

    cleaned verb (transitive active)

    garage direct object (noun)

    the adjective

    Ben subject (noun)

    raked verb (transitive active)

    leaves direct object (noun)

    the adjective

     

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    2. I wanted a green candle, but I only found this red one.

    Key

    I wanted a green candle, but I only found this red one.

    compound sentence - statement

    I wanted a green candle, I only found this red one

    independent clauses

    but coordinating conjunction

    I subject (pronoun)

    wanted verb (transitive active)

    candle direct object (noun)

    a, green adjectives

    I subject (pronoun)

    found verb (transitive active)

    only adverb

    one direct object (pronoun)

    this, red adjectives

     

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    3. Did you already rent a cabin, or shall we rent a hotel room?

    Key

    Did you already rent a cabin, or shall we rent a hotel room?

    compound sentence – question

    You did already rent a cabin, or we shall rent a hotel room.

    compound sentence – statement (Yeah. This question sounds really strange as a statement!)

    Did you already rent a cabin, shall we rent a hotel room

    independent clauses

    or coordinating conjunction

    you subject (pronoun)

    Did rent verb phrase

    Did helping verb

    rent main verb (transitive active)

    cabin direct object (noun)

    a adjective

    already adverb

    we subject (pronoun)

    shall rent verb phrase

    shall helping verb

    rent main verb (transitive active)

    room direct object (noun)

    a, hotel adjectives

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    4. He doesn’t usually ski, but he does snowboard.

    Key

    He doesn’t usually ski, but he does snowboard.

    compound sentence - statement

    He doesn’t usually ski, he does snowboard independent clauses

    but coordinating conjunction

    He subject (pronoun)

    does ski verb phrase

    does helping verb

    ski main verb (intransitive complete)

    n’t, usually adverbs

    he subject (pronoun)

    does snowboard verb phrase

    does helping verb

    snowboard main verb (intransitive complete)

     

     

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    5. I made a coffee cake and muffins for breakfast, and Mom made a spicy omelet.

    Key

    I made a coffee cake and muffins for breakfast, and Mom made a spicy omelet.

    compound sentence - statement

    I made a coffee cake and muffins for breakfast, Mom made a spicy omelet

    independent clauses

    and coordinating conjunction

    I subject (pronoun)

    made verb (transitive active)

    cake, muffins compound direct objects (nouns)

    a, coffee adjective

    and coordinating conjunction

    for breakfast prepositional phrase (adverb)

    for preposition

    breakfast object of the preposition (noun)

    Mom subject (noun)

    made verb (transitive active)

    omelet direct object (noun)

    a, spicy adjectives

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    Can You Diagram This Challenge Sentence?

    David and Allen will eat pizza or chicken and drink milk or soda, but Lori will eat hot and creamy pasta.