Lecture 2 - Rigid-Body Physics - Utrecht 2 -  ·  · 2016-05-03Lecture II: Rigid-Body Physics 3 Rigid-Body

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  • Lecture II: Rigid-Body Physics

  • 2Lecture II: Rigid-Body Physics

    Rigid-Body Motion

    Previously: Point dimensionless objects moving through a trajectory.

    Today: Objects with dimensions, moving as one piece.

  • 3Lecture II: Rigid-Body Physics

    Rigid-Body Kinematics Objects as sets of points. Relative distances between all points are

    invariant to rigid movement. Free body movement: around the center of mass

    (COM). Movement has two components:

    Linear trajectory of a central point. Relative rotation around the point.

  • 4Lecture II: Rigid-Body Physics

    Mass The measure of the amount of matter in the

    volume of an object:

    = #

    (

    : the density of each point the object volume . : the volume element.

    Equivalently: a measure of resistance to motion or change in motion.

  • 5Lecture II: Rigid-Body Physics

    Mass For a 3D object, mass is the integral over its

    volume:

    = ###(, , )

    For uniform density ( constant):

    =

  • 6Lecture II: Rigid-Body Physics

    Center of Mass The center of mass (COM) is the average point

    of the object, weighted by density:

    =1# 4

    ( : point coordinates.

    Point of balance for the object. Uniform density: COM centroid.

    COM

  • 7Lecture II: Rigid-Body Physics

    Center of Mass of System Sets of bodies have a mutual center of mass:

    =17

    88

    9

    8:; 8: mass of each body. 8: location of individual COM. = 898:; .

    Example: two spheres in 1D

    =>? =;; +AA; +A

    COM

  • 8Lecture II: Rigid-Body Physics

    Center of Mass

    Quite easy to determine for primitive shapes

    What about complex surface based models?

  • 9Lecture II: Rigid-Body Physics

    Rotational Motion a point on to the object. is the center of rotation. Distance vector = .

    = : the distance. Object rotates

    travels along a circular path. Unit-length axis of rotation: .

    Here, = (out from the screen). Rotation: counterclockwise.

    right-hand rule.

  • 10Lecture II: Rigid-Body Physics

    Angular Displacement Point covers linear distance .

    is the angular displacement of the object:

    = /

    : arc length.

    Unit is radian ()

    1 radian = angle for arc length 1 at a distance 1.

  • 11Lecture II: Rigid-Body Physics

    Angular Velocity Angular speed: the rate of change of the angular

    displacement:

    =

    unit is UVW XYZ .

    The angular velocity vector is collinear with the rotation axis:

    =

  • 12Lecture II: Rigid-Body Physics

    Angular Acceleration Angular acceleration: the rate of change of the

    angular velocity:

    =

    Paralleling definition of linear acceleration.

    Unit is /A

  • 13Lecture II: Rigid-Body Physics

    Tangential and Angular Velocities Every point moves with the same angular velocity.

    Direction of vector: .

    Tangential velocity vector:

    = Or:

    =A

    = ^_ U (abs. values) due to = 4 .

    Only the tangential part matters!

    ()

    (+ )

    ()

    ()

  • 14Lecture II: Rigid-Body Physics

    Dynamics The centripetal force creates curved

    motion.

    In the direction of (negative) Object is in orbit.

    Constant force circular rotation with constant tangential velocity. Why?

  • 15Lecture II: Rigid-Body Physics

    Tangential & Centripetal Accelerations Tangential acceleration holds:

    =

    cf. velocity equation = .

    The centripetal acceleration drives the rotational movement:

    9 =^b

    U = A.

    What is the centrifugal force?

  • 16Lecture II: Rigid-Body Physics

    Angular Momentum Linear motion linear momentum: = . Rotational motion angular momentum about

    any fixed relative point (to which is measured):

    = # (

    unit is 4 4 = (mass element)

    Angular momentum is conserved! Just like the linear momentum.

    Caveat: conserved w.r.t. the same point.

  • 17Lecture II: Rigid-Body Physics

    Angular Momentum Plugging in angular velocity:

    = =

    Integrating, we get:

    = #

    (

    Note: The angular momentum and the angular velocity are not generally collinear!

  • 18Lecture II: Rigid-Body Physics

    Moment of Inertia Define: =

    and =fgh

    .

    For a single rotating body: the angular velocity is constant. We get:

    = #

    (= #

    A + A f g hf + A + A g hf g + (A + A)h

    =

    ff fg fhgf gg ghhf hg hh

    fgh

    .

    Note: replacing integral with a (constant) matrix operating on a vector!

  • 19Lecture II: Rigid-Body Physics

    Momentum and Inertia The inertia tensor only depends on the geometry

    of the object and the relative fixed point (often, COM):

    fg = gf = #

    fh = hf = #

    gh = hg = #

    ff = # A + A

    gg = # A + A

    hh = # A + A

    =

  • 20Lecture II: Rigid-Body Physics

    The Inertia Tensor Compact form:

    =

    # A + A # #

    # # A + A #

    # # # A + A

    The diagonal elements are called the (principal) moment of inertia.

    The off-diagonal elements are called products of inertia.

  • 21Lecture II: Rigid-Body Physics

    The Inertia Tensor Equivalently, we separate mass elements to

    density and volume elements:

    = # , , A + A A + A A + A

    (

    The diagonal elements: distances to the respective principal axes.

    The non-diagonal elements: products of the perpendicular distances to the respective planes.

  • 22Lecture II: Rigid-Body Physics

    Moment of Inertia The moment of inertia j, with respect to a

    rotation axis , measures how much the mass spreads out:

    j = # j A(

    j: perpendicular distance to axis. Through the central rotation origin point.

    Measures ability to resist change in rotational motion. The angular equivalent to mass!

  • 23Lecture II: Rigid-Body Physics

    Moment and Tensor We have: j A = A = k() for any point . (Remember: is distance to origin).

    Thus:j = k()

    ? =

    k

    The scalar angular momentum around the axis is then j = j.

    Reducible to a planar problem (axis as axis).

  • 24Lecture II: Rigid-Body Physics

    Moment of Inertia For a mass point:

    = 4 jA

    For a collection of mass points: = 88A8

    For a continuous mass distribution on the plane: = jA?

    ;;

    A Ao o

  • 25Lecture II: Rigid-Body Physics

    Inertia of Primitive Shapes

    For primitive shapes, the inertia can be expressed with the parameters of the shape

    Illustration on a solid sphere Calculating inertia by integration of

    thin discs along one axis (e.g. ). Surface equation: A + A + A = A

  • 26Lecture II: Rigid-Body Physics

    Inertia of Primitive Shapes Distance to axis of rotation is the radius of the disc at the

    cross section along : A = A + A = A A.

    Summing moments of inertia of small cylinders of inertia q= U

    brA

    along the z-axis:

    q =12A =

    12A =

    12AA

    We get:

    q =;A uvwv =

    ;A A A Avwv =

    ;A[u 2A o 3

    + z 5 ]wvv = 1 2 3 + 1 5 z.

    As = 4 3 o, we finally obtain: q =AzA.

  • 27Lecture II: Rigid-Body Physics

    Inertia of Primitive Shapes Solid sphere, radius and mass :

    Hollow sphere, radius and mass :

    =

    25

    A 0 0

    025

    A 0

    0 025

    A

    =

    23

    A 0 0

    023

    A 0

    0 023

    A

    xz

    y

  • 28Lecture II: Rigid-Body Physics

    Inertia of Primitive Shapes Solid ellipsoid, semi-axes , , and mass :

    Solid box, width , height , depth and mass :

    =

    15(

    A+A) 0 0

    015(

    A+A) 0

    0 015(

    A+A)

    =

    112(A+A) 0 0

    0112(A+A) 0

    0 0112(A+A)

    xz

    y

    wd

    h

  • 29Lecture II: Rigid-Body Physics

    Inertia of Primitive Shapes Solid cylinder, radius , height and mass :

    Hollow cylinder, radius , height and mass :

    =

    112(3

    A+A) 0 0

    0112(3

    A+A) 0

    0 012

    A

    =

    112(6

    A+A) 0 0

    0112(6

    A+A) 0

    0 0 A

    h

    h

  • 30Lecture II: Rigid-Body Physics

    Parallel-Axis Theorem The object does not necessarily rotate around the

    center of mass. Some point can be fixed!

    parallel axis theorem:

    = =>? +A

    ^: inertia around axis . =>? inertia about a parallel axis through the COM. is the distance between the axes.

  • 31Lecture II: Rigid-Body Physics

    Parallel-Axis Theorem More generally, for point displacements:

    f, g, h

    ff = # A + A + fA

    gg = # A + A +gA

    hh = # A + A +hA

    fg = # + fg

    fh = # +fh

    gh = # +gh

  • 32Lecture II: Rigid-Body Physics

    Perpendicular-Axis Theorem For a planar 2D object, the moment of inertia

    about an axis perpendicular to the plane is the sum of the moments of inertia of two perpendicular axes through the same point in the plane:

    h = f + gfor any planar object

    h = 2f = 2gfor symmetrical objects

  • 33Lecture II: Rigid-Body Physics

    Reference Frame The representation of the inertia tensor is coordinate

    dependent.

    The physical effect should be invariant to coordinates!

    If transformation changes bases from body to world coordinate, the inertia tensor in world space is:

    UW = 4 Wg 4 k

    The moment of inertia is invariant! Why?

  • 34Lect