Learning environments as a third teacher - World ?· Learning environments as a third teacher. ... Indonesia.…

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  • Making education everybodys business

    Andreas SchleicherAlmaty, 11 March 2016

    Learning environments as a third teacher

  • The kind of things that are easy to teach are

    now easy to automate, digitize or outsource

  • Robotics

  • >1m km,

    one minor accident,

    occasional human intervention

  • Augmented Reality

  • The Race between Technology and Education

    Inspired by The race between technology and education Pr. Goldin & Katz (Harvard)

    Industrial revolution

    Digital revolution

    Social pain

    Universal public schooling

    Technology

    Education

    Prosperity

    Social pain

    Prosperity

  • Leverage the potential of all learners

    Better anticipate the evolution of the demand for 21st century skills and better integrate the world of

    work and learning

    Find more innovative solutions to what we learn, how we learn, when

    we learn and where we learn

    Advance from an industrial towards a professional work organisation

    build learning systems that

    Citizens expect that we8

  • Education in the past

  • Education now

  • Knowledge

    Systems

    thinking

    Design

    thinking

    Information

    literacy

    Digital

    literacy

    Global

    literacy

    11

  • Creativity Critical Thinking Problem Solving

    Innovation Collaboration Data Gathering

    Communication

    Some examples of skills12

  • Can we make the differentiator of yesterdays elite schools the key for success in every school?

    Empathy Resilience Mindfulness

    Inclusion Curiosity Ethics

    Courage Leadership

    13

  • Metacognition

    Self-

    awarenessSelf-

    regulation

    Self-

    reflection

    Self-

    adaptation

    Lifelong

    Learning

    Learning

    Strategies

    14

  • United States

    Poland

    Hong Kong-China

    Brazil

    New Zealand

    Greece

    Uruguay

    United Kingdom

    EstoniaFinland

    Albania

    Croatia

    Latvia

    Slovak RepublicLuxembourg

    Germany

    Lithuania

    Austria

    Czech Republic

    Chinese Taipei

    FranceThailand

    Japan

    Turkey SwedenHungary Australia

    Canada

    IrelandBulgaria

    Jordan

    Chile

    Macao-China

    U.A.E.

    BelgiumNetherlands

    Spain

    Argentina

    Indonesia

    Denmark

    Kazakhstan

    Peru

    Costa Rica

    Switzerland

    Montenegro

    Tunisia

    Iceland

    Slovenia

    Qatar

    Singapore

    Portugal

    Norway

    Colombia

    Malaysia

    Mexico

    Liechtenstein

    Korea

    Serbia

    Russian Fed.

    Romania

    Viet Nam

    Italy

    Shanghai-China

    R = 0.36

    300

    350

    400

    450

    500

    550

    600

    650

    -0.60 -0.40 -0.20 0.00 0.20 0.40 0.60 0.80 1.00 1.20

    Mea

    n m

    athe

    mat

    ics

    perf

    orm

    ance

    Mean index of mathematics self-efficacy

    OEC

    D

    aver

    age

    Countries where students have stronger beliefsin their abilities perform better in mathematics Fig III.4.515

  • A continuum of support16

    Make learning central, encourage

    engagement and responsibility

    Be acutely sensitive to individual

    differences

    Provide continual assessment with

    formative feedback

    Be demanding for every student with a

    high level of cognitive activation

    Ensure that students feel valued and

    included and learning is collaborative16

  • OECD EMPLOYER BRANDPlaybook

    1717

    Learning environments

  • Spending per student and learning outcomes

    Slovak Republic

    Czech RepublicEstonia

    Israel

    Poland

    Korea

    PortugalNew Zealand

    CanadaGermany

    Spain

    France

    Italy

    Singapore

    FinlandJapan

    Slovenia IrelandIceland

    Netherlands

    Sweden

    Belgium

    UKAustralia

    Denmark

    United States

    Austria

    Norway

    Switzerland

    Luxembourg

    Viet Nam

    Jordan

    Peru

    ThailandMalaysia

    Uruguay

    Turkey

    ColombiaTunisia

    MexicoMontenegro

    Brazil

    BulgariaChile

    CroatiaLithuania

    Latvia

    Hungary

    Shanghai-China

    300

    350

    400

    450

    500

    550

    600

    650

    0 20 000 40 000 60 000 80 000 100 000 120 000 140 000 160 000 180 000 200 000

    Average spending per student from the age of 6 to 15 (USD, PPPs)

    Low spending High spending

    PIS

    A M

    ath P

    erfo

    rman

    ce

  • Making change happen

    Innovation

    inspired by

    science (15/1)

    Innovation

    inspired by

    practitioners

    Innovation

    inspired by

    users

    Entrepreneurial

    development of

    new products

    and services

    19

  • %

    Yes

    No

    If I am more innovative in my teaching I will be rewarded (country average)

  • Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.32

    121

    Most teachers value 21st century pedagogies

    Percentage of lower secondary teachers who "agree" or "strongly agree" that:

    0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100

    Students learn best by finding solutions toproblems on their own

    Thinking and reasoning processes are moreimportant than specific curriculum content

    Students should be allowed to think of solutionsto practical problems themselves before the

    teacher shows them how they are solved

    My role as a teacher is to facilitate students'own inquiry

    Average

  • 0 20 40 60 80 100

    Students work on projects that require atleast one week to complete

    Students use ICT for projects or class work

    Give different work to the students who havedifficulties learning and/or to those who

    Students work in small groups to come upwith a joint solution to a problem or task

    Let students practice similar tasks untilteacher knows that every student has

    Refer to a problem from everyday life or workto demonstrate why new knowledge is useful

    Check students' exercise books orhomework

    Present a summary of recently learnedcontent

    Average

    Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.32

    2but teaching practices do not always reflect that

    Percentage of lower secondary teachers who report using the following teaching practices "frequently" or "in all or nearly all lessons"

    22

  • Innovative learning environments

    Four

    dimensions

    Regrouping

    educators

    Regrouping

    learners

    Rescheduling

    learning

    Widening

    pedagogic

    repertoires

    To gain the benefits of collaborative planning, work, and shared professional development strategies

    To open up pedagogical options To give extra attention to groups

    of learners To give learners a sense of belonging & engagement

    To mix students of different ages To mix different abilities and

    strengths To widen pedagogical options,

    including peer teaching To allow for deeper learning To create flexibility for more

    individual choices To accelerate learning To use out-of-school learning

    in effective & innovative ways

    Inquiry, authentic learning, collaboration, and formative assessment

    A prominent place for student voice & agency

    23

  • External forces

    exerting pressure and

    influence inward on

    an occupation

    Internal motivation and

    efforts of the members

    of the profession itself

    Professionalism

    Professionalism is the level of autonomy and internal regulation exercised by members of an

    occupation in providing services to society

    24

  • Policy levers to teacher professionalism

    Knowledge base for teaching (initial education and incentives for professional development)

    Autonomy: Teachers decision-making power over their work (teaching content, course offerings, discipline practices)

    Peer networks: Opportunities for exchange and support needed to maintain high standards of teaching (participation in induction, mentoring, networks, feedback from direct observations)

    Teacherprofessionalism

  • Teacher professionalism

    Knowledge base for teaching (initial education and incentives for professional development)

    Autonomy: Teachers decision-making power over their work (teaching content, course offerings, discipline practices)

    Peer networks: Opportunities for exchange and support needed to maintain high standards of teaching (participation in induction, mentoring, networks, feedback from direct observations)

  • High Peer Networks/Low Autonomy High Autonomy Knowledge Emphasis

    Balanced Domains/High Professionalism

    Balanced Domains/Low Professionalism

    Teacher professionalism

  • 0

    1

    2

    3

    4

    5

    6

    7

    8

    9

    10Sp

    ain

    Japa

    n

    Fran

    ce

    Braz

    il

    Finl

    and

    Flan

    ders

    Nor

    way

    Albe

    rta (C

    anad

    a)

    Aust

    ralia

    Den

    mar

    k

    Isra

    el

    Kore

    a

    Uni

    ted

    Stat

    es

    Cze

    ch R

    epub

    lic

    Shan

    ghai

    (Chi

    na)

    Latv

    ia

    Net

    herla

    nds

    Pola

    nd

    Engl

    and

    New

    Zea

    land

    Sing

    apor

    e

    Esto

    nia

    Networks Autonomy Knowledge

    Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.32828 TALIS Teacher professionalism index

  • 0

    10

    20

    30

    40

    50

    60

    70

    80

    90

    100

    Discu

    ss ind

    ivid

    ual

    stud

    ents

    Shar

    e re

    sour

    ces

    Team

    conf

    eren

    ces

    Colla

    bora

    te for

    com

    mon

    stan

    dar

    ds

    Team

    tea

    chin

    g

    Colla

    bora

    tive

    PD

    Join

    t ac

    tiviti

    es

    Cla

    ssro

    om

    obse

    rvat

    ions

    Perc

    enta

    ge

    of

    teac

    her

    s

    Average

    Professional collaboration

    Percentage of lower secondary teachers who report doing the following activities at least once per month

    Teacher co-operation29

    Exchange and co-ordination

  • Teachers Self-Efficacy and Professional Collaboration

    11.40

    11.60

    11.80

    12.00

    12.20

    12.40

    12.60

    12.80

    13.00

    13.20

    13.40

    Nev

    er

    Once

    a y

    ear

    or

    less

    2-4

    tim

    es a

    yea

    r

    5-10

    tim

    es a

    yea

    r

    1-3

    tim

    es a

    month

    Once

    a w

    eek

    or

    more

    Teac

    her

    sel

    f-ef

    fica

    cy (le

    vel)

    Teach jointly as a team in the same class

    Observe other teachers classes and provide feedback

    Engage in joint activities across different classes

    Take part in collaborative professional learning

    Less frequently

    Morefrequently

  • 0

    10

    20

    30

    40

    50

    60

    70

    Low professionalism

    High professionalism

    Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.33131 Teacher professionalism index and teacher outcomes

    Perceptions of teachers status

    Satisfaction with the profession

    Satisfaction with the work environment

    Teachers self-efficacy

    Predicted percentile

  • Making educational reform happen

    32

  • Clear and consistent priorities (across governments and across time), ambition and urgency, and the capacity to learn rapidly.

    Shared vision

    Appropriate targets, real-time data, monitoring, incentives aligned to targets, accountability, and the capacity to intervene where necessary.

    Performance

    management

    Building professional capabilities, sharing best practice and innovation, flexible management, and frontline ethos aligned with system objectives.

    Frontline capacity

    Strong leadership at every level, including teacher leadership, adequate process design and consistency of focus across agencies.

    Delivery architecture

    Successful reform delivery33

  • The old bureaucratic system The modern enabling system

    Some students learn at high levels All students learn at high levels

    Uniformity Embracing diversity

    Curriculum-centred Learner-centred

    Learning a place Learning an activity

    Prescription Informed profession

    Delivered wisdom User-generated wisdom

    Provision Outcomes

    Bureaucratic look-up Devolved look outwards

    Administrative control and accountability Professional forms of work organisation

    Conformity Ingenious

    Standardise distribution of resources Attract the most talented teachers to the most challenging classrooms Management Leadership

    Public vs private Public with private

    Idiosyncratic reforms Alignment of policies, coherence over time, fidelity of implementation

  • 35 Thank you

    Find out more about our work at www.oecd.org All publications The complete micro-level database

    Email: Andreas.Schleicher@OECD.orgTwitter: SchleicherEDU

    and remember:Without data, you are just another person with an opinion 35

    Slide Number 1Slide Number 2RoboticsSlide Number 5Augmented RealityThe Race between Technology and EducationCitizens expect that weSlide Number 9Slide Number 10Slide Number 11Some examples of skillsCan we make the differentiator of yesterdays elite schools the key for success in every school?Metacognition Countries where students have stronger beliefsin their abilities perform better in mathematicsA continuum of supportSlide Number 17Spending per student and learning outcomesMaking change happenSlide Number 20Slide Number 21Slide Number 22Innovative learning environmentsProfessionalismSlide Number 25Slide Number 26Slide Number 27Slide Number 28Slide Number 29Slide Number 30Slide Number 31Slide Number 32Successful reform deliverySlide Number 34Slide Number 35

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