LANGUAGE Sentences Subjects - Predicates Punctuation

  • View
    214

  • Download
    1

Embed Size (px)

Transcript

  • Slide 1
  • LANGUAGE Sentences Subjects - Predicates Punctuation
  • Slide 2
  • SENTENCES When you read this, you are reading a sentence. Now you are reading another sentence. What is a sentence?
  • Slide 3
  • A sentence is a group of words that tells a complete thought. A sentence is a group of words that make sense.
  • Slide 4
  • Look at these groups of words. Are they sentences? 1. Jennifer walks to the beach. 2. She takes her dog with her. 3. in the water
  • Slide 5
  • Number 1 is a complete thought. Jennifer walks to the beach. Every sentence must start with a capital letter and ends with a punctuation mark. A sentence tells a complete thought.
  • Slide 6
  • Number 2 is also a sentence. It tells you a complete thought. She takes her dog with her. It also starts with a capital letter and ends with a period.
  • Slide 7
  • Number 3 is not a sentence. It does not tell you a complete thought. It leaves you with questions. in the water What is in the water?
  • Slide 8
  • Number 3 is a phrase. We can add words to make it a complete sentence. Change, in the water, to a complete sentence.
  • Slide 9
  • SUBJECTS Every sentence must have a subject. The subject is the who or what the sentence is about.
  • Slide 10
  • Jennifer walks her dog. To find the subject ask: who or what. Who walks the dog? Jennifer walks the dog. Jennifer is the subject.
  • Slide 11
  • PREDICATE After you find the subject it is easy to find the predicate. The predicate is just about all of the other words in the sentence.
  • Slide 12
  • Jennifer walks her dog. Jennifer is the subject. walks her dog, is the predicate. The predicate is the verb and the words after the verb.
  • Slide 13
  • Can you find the subject and the predicate in the sentence below? Remember: the subject tells you who or what. The predicate is the verb and the words after the verb.
  • Slide 14
  • STOP Lauren swims in the water. Circle the subject. Underline the predicate.
  • Slide 15
  • STOP Emmaly rode her blue bike in the street. Circle the subject. Underline the predicate.
  • Slide 16
  • Sometimes a subject has more than one word. See if you can find the subject in the next sentence.
  • Slide 17
  • Our new teacher has long brown hair. Remember to ask: who or what? Who has long brown hair?
  • Slide 18
  • If you guessed, our new teacher, you are right! Sometimes extra words are used to describe the subject.
  • Slide 19
  • STOP Find the subject. My little grandbaby Madison has blue eyes.
  • Slide 20
  • Can you find the subject and the predicate of the next sentence? Subject: who or what Predicate: verb and words after the verb
  • Slide 21
  • STOP Circle the complete subject. Underline the complete predicate. The alien spaceship landed at our school.
  • Slide 22
  • Rules for Writing Sentences Rule 1. Every sentence must begin with a capital letter. Rule 2. Every sentence must end with a punctuation mark. Use different marks for different kinds of sentences.
  • Slide 23
  • . ? ! You use a period to end sentences that tell something. Sentences that ask questions end with question marks. Sentences that show excitement end with an exclamation mark!
  • Slide 24
  • Now it is your turn. See if you can pick the correct punctuation for the next sentences.
  • Slide 25
  • We won __ Whats for lunch__ I got an A on the test__ My dog ate the plant__ Can you come over__
  • Slide 26
  • Bonus: Find some complete sentences in books and magazines. Write down the sentences. Circle the complete subject and underline the complete predicate.

Recommended

View more >