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lifting appliances

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  • CODE FOR LIFTING APPLIANCESIN A MARINE ENVIRONMENT

    AUGUST 2009

  • A guide to the Rules

    Code for Lifting Appliances in a MarineEnvironment

    Introduction

    These Rules are published as a complete book.

    Numbering and Cross-References

    A decimal notation system has been adopted throughout. Fivesets of digits cover the divisions, i.e. Section, sub-Section andparagraph. The textual cross-referencing within the text is as follows, although the right hand digits may be added or omitteddepending on the degree of precision required: (a) In same Section, e.g. see 2.1.3 (i.e. down to paragraph).(b) In another book, e.g. see Pt 5, Ch 1,3 of the (name of

    book) (i.e. down to Section).

    The cross-referencing for Figures and Tables is as follows:(a) In same Section, e.g. as shown in Fig. 3.5 (i.e. Section and

    Figure Number).(b) In another book, e.g. see Table 2.7.1 in Pt 3, Ch 2 of the

    (name of book).

    Rules updating

    These Rules are published and changed through a system ofNotices. Subscribers are forwarded copies of such Noticeswhen the Rules change.

    Current changes to the Rules that appeared in Notices areshown with a black rule alongside the amended paragraph onthe left hand side. A solid black rule indicates amendments anda dotted black rule indicates corrigenda.

    August 2009

    Lloyds Register is an exempt charity under the UK Charities Act 1993

    Lloyd's Register, its affiliates and subsidiaries and their respective officers, employees or agents are, individually and collectively, referred to in this clauseas the Lloyd's Register Group. The Lloyd's Register Group assumes no responsibility and shall not be liable to any person for any loss, damage orexpense caused by reliance on the information or advice in this document or howsoever provided, unless that person has signed a contract with therelevant Lloyd's Register Group entity for the provision of this information or advice and in that case any responsibility or liability is exclusively on theterms and conditions set out in that contract.

  • Chapter ContentsCODE FOR LIFTING APPLIANCES IN A MARINE ENVIRONMENT, August 2009

    LLOYDS REGISTER 1

    CODE FOR LIFTING APPLIANCES IN A MARINE ENVIRONMENT

    General Regulations

    Chapter 1 General

    2 Derrick Systems

    3 Cranes and Submersible Lifting Appliances

    4 Mechanical Lift Docks

    5 Lifts and Ramps

    6 Fittings, Loose Gear and Ropes

    7 Machinery, Electrical Installations and Control Engineering Systems

    8 Materials

    9 Testing, Marking and Survey Requirements

    10 Documentation

    Lloyd's Register of Shipping, 2009. All rights reserved.

    Except as permitted under current legislation no part of this work may be photocopied, stored in a retrieval system, published, performed in public,adapted, broadcast, transmitted, recorded or reproduced in any form or by any means, without the prior permission of the copyright owner. Enquiriesshould be addressed to Lloyd's Register of Shipping, 71 Fenchurch Street, London, EC3M 4BS.

  • ContentsCODE FOR LIFTING APPLIANCES IN A MARINE ENVIRONMENT, August 2009

    LLOYDS REGISTER 3

    GENERAL REGULATIONS

    Sections 1 to 8

    CHAPTER 1 GENERAL

    Section 1 Introduction1.1 Application1.2 Certification1.3 Classification1.4 Equivalents1.5 Calculations

    Section 2 Definitions2.1 Safe Working Load (SWL) of a lifting appliance2.2 Safe Working Load (SWL) of a lifting component (loose gear)2.3 Service category2.4 Geometrical limit2.5 Factored load2.6 Duty factor2.7 Dynamic factor2.8 Live load2.9 Dead load

    2.10 Design stress

    Section 3 Plans and information to be submitted3.1 Derrick systems3.2 Crane systems3.3 Mechanical lift docks3.4 Lifts and ramps

    CHAPTER 2 DERRICK SYSTEMS

    Section 1 General1.1 Application1.2 Equivalents1.3 Additional calculations1.4 Information to be submitted1.5 Materials1.6 Symbols and definitions

    Section 2 Design criteria2.1 Operating range for derricks2.2 Inclination of the ship2.3 Weight of boom and tackle2.4 Friction allowance2.5 Factor of safety for ropes

    Section 3 Swinging derrick systems3.1 General3.2 Operating conditions3.3 Force diagrams and calculations

    Section 4 Union purchase arrangements4.1 General4.2 Working range of the rig4.3 Calculation of forces

  • ContentsCODE FOR LIFTING APPLIANCES IN A MARINE ENVIRONMENT, August 2009

    LLOYDS REGISTER4

    Section 5 Derrick cranes and derricks of special design5.1 General5.2 Twin span tackles5.3 Slewing guys5.4 Derrick booms

    Section 6 Derrick booms6.1 General6.2 Determination of forces6.3 Boom scantlings6.4 Construction details

    Section 7 Masts and derrick posts7.1 General7.2 Symbols7.3 Loading and allowable stresses7.4 Stress calculations Unstayed masts7.5 Stress calculations Stayed masts7.6 Construction details7.7 Stays

    Section 8 Fittings for masts and derrick booms8.1 General8.2 Goosenecks and derrick heel assemblies8.3 Cargo runner and span tackle8.4 Slewing and preventer guys8.5 Swivelling and fixed eyeplates8.6 Blocks8.7 Cargo hooks8.8 Miscellaneous fittings8.9 Deck eyeplates

    CHAPTER 3 CRANES AND SUBMERSIBLE LIFTING APPLIANCES

    Section 1 Introduction1.1 General1.2 Crane types1.3 Service category1.4 Alternative basis of approval

    Section 2 Shipboard cranes2.1 General2.2 Load considerations2.3 Duty factor2.4 Basic loads2.5 Dynamic forces2.6 Dynamic forces due to crane movements2.7 Slewing forces2.8 Centrifugal forces2.9 Transverse forces due to travel motions

    2.10 Buffer forces2.11 Forces due to ship motion2.12 Wind loading2.13 Snow and ice loads2.14 Temperature effects2.15 Platform and access way loading2.16 Load combinations2.17 Stability2.18 Allowable stress Elastic failure2.19 Allowable stress Compression and bending members2.20 Crane jibs Overall stability

  • ContentsCODE FOR LIFTING APPLIANCES IN A MARINE ENVIRONMENT, August 2009

    LLOYDS REGISTER 5

    2.21 Slenderness ratio2.22 Allowable stress Plate buckling failure

    ` 2.23 Allowable stress Buckling failure of thin walled cylinders2.24 Allowable stress Joints and connections2.25 Slewing ring and slewing ring bolting2.26 Materials2.27 Rope safety factors and sheave ratio

    Section 3 Offshore cranes3.1 General3.2 Service category and duty factor3.3 Dynamic forces3.4 Offlead angles3.5 Hoisting speed3.6 Slew rings3.7 Materials3.8 Rope safety factors3.9 Motion compensators

    Section 4 Submersible handling systems4.1 General4.2 Service category and duty factor4.3 Basic loads4.4 Dynamic forces4.5 Offlead angles4.6 Stowage arrangements4.7 Materials4.8 Rope safety factors

    Section 5 Pedestals and foundation5.1 General5.2 Design loads5.3 Allowable stresses5.4 Materials

    CHAPTER 4 MECHANICAL LIFT DOCKS

    Section 1 General1.1 Scope1.2 Procedure1.3 Lifting capacity1.4 Machinery, control and operational features

    Section 2 Structural design criteria2.1 Loading2.2 Allowable stresses2.3 Rope and chain factors of safety2.4 Materials

    Section 3 Testing3.1 General3.2 Load tests3.3 Operational test

    Section 4 Classification Regulations4.1 General4.2 Character of classification and class notation4.3 Initial Survey4.4 Periodical Survey4.5 Classification of installations not built under survey

  • ContentsCODE FOR LIFTING APPLIANCES IN A MARINE ENVIRONMENT, August 2009

    LLOYDS REGISTER6

    Section 5 Certification requirements5.1 General

    CHAPTER 5 LIFTS AND RAMPS

    Section 1 Introduction1.1 General

    Section 2 Cargo and vehicle lifts2.1 General2.2 Basic loads2.3 Dynamic forces due to hoisting2.4 Forces due to ship motion2.5 Design loads2.6 Load combinations2.7 Allowable stress Elastic failure2.8 Allowable stress Plate buckling failure2.9 Required deck plating thickness

    2.10 Deflection criteria2.11 Guide rails2.12 Stowage locks2.13 Hoisting arrangements2.14 Materials

    Section 3 Vehicle ramps3.1 General3.2 Basic loads3.3 Forces due to ship motion3.4 Design loads3.5 Load combinations3.6 Allowable stresses3.7 Deflection criteria3.8 Stowage locks3.9 Hoisting and slewing arrangements

    3.10 Materials

    Section 4 Passenger lifts4.1 General4.2 Basic loads4.3 Dynamic forces resulting from operation of safety device or car striking buffers4.4 Forces due to ship motion4.5 Load combination4.6 Allowable stresses4.7 Deflection criteria4.8 Guides4.9 Safety gear

    4.10 Overspeed governors4.11 Buffers4.12 Hoisting arrangements4.13 Lift trunk and motor room4.14 Lift car and counterweight4.15 Landing doors4.16 Emergency means of escape

    CHAPTER 6 FITTINGS, LOOSE GEAR AND ROPES

    Section 1 General1.1 Application1.2 Materials and construction1.3 Testing and certification

  • ContentsCODE FOR LIFTING APPLIANCES IN A MARINE ENVIRONMENT, August 2009

    LLOYDS REGISTER 7

    Section 2 Fittings2.1 Gooseneck and derrick heel assemblies2.2 Swivel bearing assemblies2.3 Fixed eyeplates2.4 Built-in sheaves

    Section 3 Blocks3.1 General3.2 Design loads and stresses3.3 Materials and construction3.4 Blocks for fibre ropes

    Section 4 Spreaders and lifting beams4.1 General4.2 Loading and allowable stress

    Section 5 Loose gear5.1 Shackles5.2 Hooks5.3 Swivels and lifting eyes5.4 Chains, links and rings5.5 Miscellaneous items

    Section 6 Steel wire ropes6.1 General6.2 Steel wire for ropes6.3 Construction and application6.4 Splicing and terminal connections

    Section 7 Fibre ropes7.1 General7.2 Application7.3 Slicing and terminal connections

    CHAPTER 7 MACHINERY, ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS AND CONTROL ENGINEERING SYSTEMS

    Section 1 Introduction1.1 General1.2 Design criteria for lifting appliance mechanisms1.3 Certification of lifting appliances1.4 Classification of lifting appliances

    Section 2 Mechanical aspects (classification requi