INSTITUTIONAL EQUITY RESEARCH Communications Ltd IN) INSTITUTIONAL EQUITY RESEARCH Ortel Communications

  • View
    0

  • Download
    0

Embed Size (px)

Text of INSTITUTIONAL EQUITY RESEARCH Communications Ltd IN) INSTITUTIONAL EQUITY RESEARCH Ortel...

  • INSTITUTIONAL EQUITY RESEARCH   

    Ortel Communications Ltd (ORTEL IN)  Owning its growth; B2C company at B2B valuations   

    Page | 1 | PHILLIPCAPITAL INDIA RESEARCH 

    INDIA | MEDIA | Initiating Coverage 

     

       

    26 May 2016 

    Ortel  is  a  regional  cable  TV  and  broadband  provider  focused  on  the  states  of Odisha,  Chhattisgarh, MP,  AP, WB,  and  Telengana.  Its  combination  of  last‐mile  ownership  and  superior broadband distribution infrastructure makes it the best distribution model in the  industry  (proven  in  developed  markets),  positioning  it  for  long‐term  success.  Its  investments  in  its network and platform put  it  in a strong position to benefit from rising  demand  for high‐bandwidth broadband  services. Given  its  strategic  strengths,  it  is well‐ placed to clock impressive revenue/EBITDA CAGRs of 36%/46% over FY16‐18. We believe  its  assets  and  its management’s  continued  execution warrant  a  premium multiple. We  initiate  coverage  on  Ortel  Communications  with  a  BUY  rating  and  value  it  using  DCF  methodology, arriving at a one‐year forward target price of Rs 300.     Differentiated last‐mile model commands highest operating margins among peers: Unlike  most national MSOs, which follow a B2B model, Ortel has differentiated itself by focusing on  ownership and control of the last mile (currently owns 90% of its subscribers). At ~0.65mn,  its primary subscribers are at a similar scale or even higher than some national MSOs. Direct  collections  from  subscribers help  in:  (1) controlling  trade  receivables  (43 days vs. 100‐130  days for other MSOs), (2) reducing revenue leakage to LCOs (ARPU is 30% higher than other  MSOs), and  (3)  in commanding the highest operating margins among peers  (34% vs. 

  •    

    ORTEL COMMUNICATIONS INITIATING COVERAGE 

    Business model superior to existing MSOs  The  business  dynamics  of  India’s  pay‐TV  market  is  changing  significantly,  with  government‐mandated  digitisation  acting  as  a  catalyst.  Government  of  India  has  mandated digitisation in India in four phases. Phases 1 and 2 are already over (top 38  cities  in  India).  Phase‐3’s  deadline was  December  2015  and  phase‐4’s  deadline  is  December  2016.  In  the  entire  analog  cable  value  chain,  organized MSOs  capture  limited value; it is currently dominated by unorganized LCOs.     Here are key issues plaguing the cable model:  • Greater bargaining power rests with the LCOs: MSOs and LCOs have a mutually 

    dependent relationship; LCOs control the last‐mile operations and MSOs control  the  scale  functions.  Since  the  last mile  is  handled  by  the  LCOs,  the  flow  of  subscription revenue (which is collected by LCO) to MSOs remains below par. In  order  to  usher  in  a  digital‐cable  regime,  TRAI  has  issued  a  directive  in  2012  specifying 55:45  revenue  sharing  for MSO:LCO  for  FTA  channels  and 65:35  for  pay‐TV channels. Despite TRAI’s order, the revenue share is not even close to the  baseline number. 

    Dependence on LCOs for last‐mile  connectivity is hindering the  implementation of packaging and  tiering 

    • Cutthroat competition among MSOs to grab higher subscriber market share: In  the analog cable regime, it was very easy for an LCO to switch to a new MSO. An  LCO that switched would not only  impact MSO’s subscription revenue, but also  impact carriage revenue. While MSOs have agreed in‐principle to stop poaching  LCOs from each other, they still need to implement this strictly.  

      MSOs have very few direct subscribers and therefore, are heavily dependent on LCOs  for last‐mile connectivity. This, coupled with the loose arrangement between an MSO  and an LCO makes the MSO vulnerable to any entry by a player with deep pockets.     Digitisation was supposed to change the entire equation   The  government’s  DAS mandate  was  the  big  hope  –  with  encrypted  signals  and  deployment of STBs at customers’ premises, 100%  subscriber addressability was  to  be ensured,  resulting  in  improved  share of ARPUs  for MSOs. While  the  seeding of  STBs  was  done  on  time,  it  has  only  been  a  ‘technical  digitisation’  and  not  true  digitisation; the process of collecting consumer‐level data and the implementation of  packaging/tiering has been painfully slow. The old practice of customers paying  for  the base pack and receiving all channels is still continuing at many places, with LCOs  reluctant to roll‐out channel packages. MSO’s share of consumer ARPUs remains sub‐ par  and  disputes with  LCOs  and  broadcasters  lead  to  churn‐out  of  subscribers  (to  DTH) even in phase‐1/2 markets.     Last mile connectivity is the key differentiator for Ortel   Unlike most national MSOs, which follow a B2B model, Ortel has differentiated itself  by focusing on ownership and control of the last mile (it owns 90% of its subscribers).  Due  to  this, Ortel ensures  legally approved  rights of way, superior service, minimal  leakages, and that the quality of its network is uniformly maintained. Direct access to  subscribers also limits large‐scale churn (essentially LCO churn). Direct collections for  subscribers help in controlling trade receivables and reduce revenue leakage to LCOs. 

    Ortel owns 90% of its subscribers, which  ensures that quality of network is  uniformly maintained along with  superior customer support service 

         

    Page | 2 | PHILLIPCAPITAL INDIA RESEARCH 

  •    

    ORTEL COMMUNICATIONS INITIATING COVERAGE 

    ARPU comparison – Ortel vs. other MSOs 

     

    40

    60

    80

    100

    120

    140

    160

    180

    200

    Q1FY15 Q2FY15 Q3FY15 Q4FY15 Q1FY16 Q2FY16 Q3FY16

    Hathway* ‐ Phase I ARPU Hathway* ‐ Phase II ARPU Ortel ‐ Analog ARPU Ortel ‐ Digital ARPU

    Ortel ARPU is 30% higher  than that of Hathway

    *‐ARPU of other MSOs are also in similar territory 

    Source: Hathway company presentation, PhillipCapital India Research      Comparison of receivable days – Ortel stands out  Receivable days  FY13 FY14 FY15 Ortel  38.2 42.1 42.4 Hathway  94.9 100.1 108.3 Siti Cable  67.8 76.5 105.5 Den Networks  123.7 119.3 129.6

    Source: PhillipCapital India Research      Highest operating margins  among peers: Ortel’s  last‐mile  connectivity  allows  it  to  command  the highest operating margins amongst  its peers, as  there  is no  revenue  sharing with  the LCO. Last mile also ensures  that  the company addresses customer  grievances  on  a  real‐time  basis.  Over  the  last  five  years,  its  EBITDA  growth  has  outgrown  revenue;  its margins have expanded  to 34%  in  FY15  (33%  in  FY16)  from  29% in FY13.      EBITDA margin comparison across all MSOs  EBITDAM (%)  FY13 FY14 FY15 Ortel  28.8% 28.6% 34.1% Hathway  24.2% 19.0% 14.2% Siti Cable  15.5% 16.2% 15.2% Den Networks  22.0% 24.8% 6.8%

    Source: PhillipCapital India Research       

    Page | 3 | PHILLIPCAPITAL INDIA RESEARCH 

  •    

    ORTEL COMMUNICATIONS INITIATING COVERAGE 

    Ortel’s differentiated business model explained   

       

    Business Model

    B2B model operated  through 

    franhchises/LCOs; 60‐ 70% of subscription 

    revenue is shared with  the LCOs

    B2C model focused on  primary points enables  Ortel to capture entire  subscription revenues

    Carriae and Placement  (C&P) Revenue

    Continue to depend  highly on C&P, which  accounts over 1/3rd of  operating revenues

    Low dependence on  C&P holds Ortel in  good stead as 

    digitalization would  gradually abolish 

    carriage

    Cross‐selling

    Dont have the ability  to provide broadband  and other services as  the network is owned 

    by LCOs

    Easier to offer a full  range of services,  leading to better 

    margins

    Working Capital

    A longer collection  cycle, with receivable  days ranging between 

    100‐130 days

    Direct collections  enable better cash 

    flow management and  a healthier working 

    capital cycle

    National MSOs 

    Ortel  Communications

      Ortel’s primary subscriber base is one of the highest in the industry 

     

    0.0

    0.1

    0.2

    0.3

    0.4

    0.5

    0.6

    0.7

    0.8

    Hathway Siti Cable Den Networks In digital Digicable Ortel Cable Ortel Cable*

    FY15

    *‐FY16 primary subscriber numbers 

    Source: Phil