Click here to load reader

INFANTRY FIELD MANUAL - 6th Corps Combat 7-35...AMMUNITION. General ... able avenues for tank approach, or are grouped with infantry ... * INFANTRY FIELD MANUAL

  • View
    220

  • Download
    0

Embed Size (px)

Text of INFANTRY FIELD MANUAL - 6th Corps Combat 7-35...AMMUNITION. General ... able avenues for tank...

  • MlHI FM 7-3..Copy 3 1

    WAR DEPARTMENT

    INFANTRY FIELDMANUAL

    ANTITANK COMPANY, RIFLEREGIMENTMay 23, 1941

  • FM 7-35

    INFANTRY FIELD MANUAL

    ANTITANK COMPANY, RIFLEREGIMENT

    Prepared under direction of theChief of Infantry

    UNITED STATES

    GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE

    WASHINGTON: 1941

    Forsale by the Superintendent of Doenments. Washington. D. C --Pr'*ce ID cents

  • WAR DEPARTMENT,WASHINGTON, May 23, 1941.

    FM 7-35, Infantry Field Manual, Antitank Company, RifleRegiment, is published for the information and guidance ofall concerned.

    [A. G. 062.11 (4-18-41).]

    BY ORDER OF THE SECRETARY OF WAR:G. C. MARSHALL,

    Chief of Staff.OFFICIAL:

    E. S. ADAMS,Major General,

    The Adjutant General.DISTRIBUTION:

    D 2, 7, 17 (5); B 2, 6, 7, 17 (5); R 2, 6 (10), 7, 17 (20);IBn 7 (30); IC 2, 7, 17 (20).

    II

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS

    SECTION I. DOCTRINE. Paragraph PageGeneral methods of antitank ac-

    tion_ _......_..__ I 1Training- .--------------------- 2 2Combat information and orders__ 3 3Local security and warning serv-

    ice ---------...-... ..... _.. .. 4 4II. CHARACTrISTICS or 37-MM GUN AND

    UiN POSITIONS.Technical characteristics .------- 5 5Tactical llmitatlons ---------- - f6 5Position ------------------------ 7 5

    III. ANTITANK GUN SQUAD.Reference- .------------------ 8 7Composition -_-_-__......__..___ 9 7Equipment and transportation_-_ 10 7Duties _______--___----------- 11 7Movement ------.----- ___-___-_ 12 8Occupation of firing position ---- 13 8Fire control- .------------ ----- 14 10Displacement -. _-._.. ........... 15 11

    IV. RIFmE SQUA.References ------------------- - 16 11Composition .-.........._______ 17 11Equipment and transportatlon__- 18 11Mission _____-_- _-...____... .. _ 19 11Enployment __-....____________ 20 12

    V. ANTITANK GUN SECTION.Composition -_-___----___-__---- 21 12Equipment and transportation-__ 22 12Duties ....-..-......----------- 23 13Fire mission- .---------___-____ 24 13Route march- - ___-_.. 25 14Regimental approach march__ _- 26 14Reconnaissance and occupation of

    firing position ---.... ____.__._ 27 14Fire direction and control .-- _--- 28 15Displacement __.---------------- 29 15

    VI. ANTITANK Gom PLATOON.Composition .--------_______---- 30 17Command group- ----.---------- 31 17Distrlbution of personnel for

    movement -___....____ ____.. 32 18Regimental approach march ---- 33 19Support of attacking echelon -. 34 20Defense _ - -------------------- 35 21

    VII. ANTITANK GUN COMPANT.Composition --___.__----_____-__ 36 21Equipment and transportation__ _ 37 21Company headquarters .--------- 38 21Duties of command group .------ 39 21Administration and supply group_ 40 22Transportation- ----. -____...._. . 41 23

    In

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS

    SECTION VII. ANTITANK GUN COMPANY-Continued. Paragraph Page

    Signal communication ---.- _--__ 42 23MissLon- --------- __-_-_--__-__- 43 23Regimental route march _-_----- 44 23Regimental approach march ----- 45 24Regimental assembly for action... 46 25Attack- .---------------------- 47 25Displacement .------------------ 48 26Pursuit- .-. . .................. 49 27Regimental defense -.--------- O 50 27Withdrawal- .-.. _.______ 51 28

    VIII. AMMUNITION.General --------- --- ----------- 52 28Replenishment- .--------------- 53 28Distribution ...-................ 54 29

    APPENDIX I. PERSONNEM, ARMAMENT, EQUIPMENT, ANDTRANSPORTATION, ANTITANK UNITS.

    Antitank gun squad- .---------- ____ 30Rifle squad- --------------------- 30Antitank gun section- - ____.._.. -_ 31Antitank gun platoon- .-------- ____ 31Antitank gun company- .------ __ _ 32Transportatlon .-... . .......... ____ 32

    IT. LIST OF REFERENCES -.-------------.- ---- 34

    IV

  • FM 7-35

    INFANTRY FIELD MANUALANTITANK COMPANY, RIFLE REGIMENT

    SECTION I

    DOCTRINE

    * . GENERAL METHODS OF ANTITANK ACTION.-a. The ac-tion of antitank units must be included with the actionof other combat elements, both in attack and in defense.In approach march and attack, the movements and positionsof antitank units must be coordinated to insure protection ofthe attacking troops and their reserves against counterattack.In defense they cover the main line of resistance and favor-able avenues for tank approach, or are grouped with infantryreserves and armored units for the support of counterattacks.The employment of antitank units as independent defensiveelements and their distribution with a view to covering everypossible avenue of tank approach or to affording immediateprotection to all echelons of the forces lead to uncoordinatedaction and a dispersion of the means of antitank defense withconsequent loss of effectiveness. The employment of antitankunits must be included in the general plan of action of theentire force.

    b. Within the limitations fixed by the location and missionof the troops, the terrain dictates the distribution of antitankgun units.

    c. The defense of a position against an enemy force, includ-ing armored units, comprises two main elements:

    (1) Tactical localities organized in depth and garrisonedfor the defense of the main line of resistance and includingthe antitank units (reinforced when necessary) of the frontline regiments and passive antitank means such as mines andobstacles.

    (2) Reserves of large units held out for counterattack andincluding foot infantry, armored units, and antitank units.

    d. Where the organized localities, including active and pas-sive antitank means, do not succeed in stopping the attack,they disrupt, retard, and canalize the attacking armored units

    1

  • 1-2 INFANTRY FIELD MANUAL

    and thus create conditions favorable for counterattack by theintact defensive reserves. The reserve antitank units occupypositions in such manner as to afford protection against hostiletanks, and to disrupt further and canalize the tanks intozones where they may be effectively dealt with by the counter-attacking forces and other planned active and passive meas-ures. The location of antitank mines and obstacles must beknown to counterattack forces, especially friendly mechan-ized elements. Whenever practicable the location of minefields and obstacles should be coordinated in advance withcounterattack plans.

    2. TRANING.--a. Members of the antitank company aretrained as individual soldiers and as operators of crew-oper-ated weapons in accordance with FM 7-5. All members ofthe company are trained to operate motor vehicles and theautomatic rifle against air or ground emergency targets.

    b. Antitank units are trained with tank units, both asfriendly and hostile forces. They are trained to recognizethe strong and the vulnerable features of tanks, their dis-tinguishing characteristics, and combat methods. Com-manders impress on their men that the tank crew's limitedfield of vision increases the value of cover and concealment;that flight before armored vehicles invites certain destruc-tion; and that a tenacious spirit and accurate delivery offire give gun crews every chance of success. They are taughtthat premature opening of fire may disclose the gun posi-tions and result in neutralization before the gun crew canaccomplish its mission, and that the fight between themand the armored foe lasts only a few minutes and will bedecided principally by their skill and moral stamina. Theyare trained to estimate the practicability of terrain for tankmovement and the relative effectiveness of antitank obsta-cles.

    c. Training in driving over varied ground is conducted toteach chauffeurs to estimate the clearance of the vehicle andpiece and the degree of angular turn, and to facilitate hastyoccupation of positions and rapid displacements. Care mustbe emphasized in operating over rough terrain to precludeinjury to the vehicle and piece.

    d. When moving in the combat area the prime movers (orweapon carriers) follow their leader with 50 yards to 100 yards

    2

  • ANTITANK COMPANY, RIFLE REGIMENT 2-3

    distance. If the vehicle ahead halts, others halt, keepingtheir distances unless signalled to close up. As vehicles haltthey draw off the road or trail and stop under a tree, againsta bush, or behind any nearby cover. If possible they stop ina shadow. If the leader directs or signals "take cover," thetrucks endeavor to get behind walls, buildings, banks, or intodepressions which give better cover from fire and view. Afew branches are habitually carried to break the outline ofthe vehicles and guns if they are forced to halt in the open.Guns and vehicles are parked or concealed so that they mayreadily resume the march.

    e. Over rough ground or hard going the men dismount andfollow their vehicles, helping if necessary. One man leadsto pick a route. At night he carries a dimmed light for thedriver to follow.

    I. Covered routes are sought. Edges of woods, scatteredbuildings, or trees contribute to concealment. Open crestsare avoided. When forced to cross a crest, a place is soughtwhere the outline is broken by trees, houses, etc.

    g. In unfamiliar terrain the leader should proceed (witha connecting file and on foot, if necessary) to select a route.

    h. When moving to positions not fully protected by othertroops, vehicles advance by bounds, each bound being recon-noitered by a single vehicle or man on foot or motorcycle be-fore the others are signalled forward.

    U 3. COMBAT INFORMATION AND ORDERS.-Each antitank unitcommander passes on promptly to his subordinates the fol-lowing:

    a. Enemy information.-Emphasize the latest identificationand reports concerning the movements of tanks and othermotorized forces.

    b. Information of our own and supporting troops.-Loca-tion, identification, and proposed employment of friendlytroops, especially of mechanized and oth