IF YOU CAN'T RND IT AT THE COMPLEAT 51 RJ'd'EGIST EDITOR'S NOTES ... The staff of The Courier was able to attend both Pacific Origins and GenCon ... tlefield that armour,

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  • IF YOU CAN'T RND IT AT THE COMPLEAT 51 RJ'd'EGIST

    YOU WON'T RND IT ANYWHERE!

    At THE COMPLEAT STRATEGIST you'll be able to find everything you'll ever need or want for your wargaming hobby, from books to brigands! We carry historical books, refer-ence books, boardgames, all the historical wargame magazines, at least 50 different historical wargame rules from ancients to modems. We have over 3,000 figures and a complete line of paints, brushes and accessories.

    You'll enjoy the friendly casual atmosphere at THE COMPLEAT STRATEGIST and our staff will be happy to answer any questions you may have and assist you with your

    THE ~--

    you can't wait to get home to start playing.* We are happy to announce the opening of

    another store that caters particularly to the historical wargamer, located at:

    320 West 57th Street New York, N~ Opening Date:

    On or about June 1, 1981 If you're unable to visit one of our

    locations, we also accept mail AND phone orders. Mail orders are accepted ONLY at our 33rd Street location; or by phone during business hours at (212) 685-3880-1 . Please

    use VISA or MASTERCHARGE for phone orders. Write to purchases. There are

    even game rooms located in our stores just in case OMPLFAT

    the store nearest you for a free Catalog.

    In New York: II E. 33rd St. NY.C.lOOI6 (212)685-3880-1 10:30-6:00

    JR4TEGIS-WE'VE GOT IT ALU No game room at the 57 th Street store.

    In New Jersey: 209 Glenridge Ave. Montclair, NJ. 07042 (201)744-6622 11 :00-7:00 Tues. to Sat. Thurs. till 9:00

    In Florida: 5406-8 Stirling Rd. Davie, Fla. 33314 (305)961-5660 11:00-7:00 Tues. to Sat. Thurs. till 9:00

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    NORTH AMERICA'S FOREMOST MINIATURE GAMING MAGAZINE

    FEATURE ARTICLES

    ARMIES & SOLDIERS OF THE PIKE AND SHOT PERIOD DON FEA THERSTONE starts off our Renaissance Theme Year ... ............ .. . . . .. . . . . . . . . 3

    NAVAL CAMPAIGNS SCENARIOS AND GAMES CLI FF SA YRE, JR . presents several campaign approaches ... . .. .. . . . . . .. . .. . . ........... . . 13

    WHEN YOU'RE WHIPPED SAM GILL another thought provoking insight into ourselves . . . ... . . . . .. . . . . 21

    THE WILDERNESS CAMPAIGN DA VID GLICK runs an interesting ACW campaign . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 27

    PAOLI'S CORSICAN FORCES, 1775-69 DAVID SWEET presents another little known army ........ . . . . . . . . . ...... . . . ......... . . . . .. . 33

    EYEWITNESS ACCOUNTS OF HISTORY J 1M ARNOLD the first in a series - The Sand Pit Near La Haye Sainte ....... . . . 35

    DAY BY DAY IN HISTORY P. HOLLINGER & E. RITCHIE Historical happenings in July and August . First of a series . 37

    DEPARTMENTS

    THE REVIEWING STAND with Jim Womer ............. . . . 24

    THE COURIER DISPATCH with Robert Maclean ... ....... . 39

    SAPPER'S REPORT Build the Tuck & Tankard with Otto Schmidt II . 41

    DISPATCHES FROM THE FIELD letters to the Editor ... . . . . . .................. . . 45

    VOLLEY FIRE Tell us what you like. . or don' t ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . .... ... . . . .. . 48

    .~- -ARMIES & SOLDIERS OF THE PIKE AND SHOT PERIOD 3 NAVAL CAMPAIGNS PG 13

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  • \!Cur

    tPltu~i~tt MANAGING EDITOR: Richard L. Bryant

    BUSINESS MANAGER: leo Cronin

    ART DIRECTOR: Joseph Miceli ADVERTISING MANAGER: G lor ia Mi ce li

    THEME EDITOR: THE RENAISSANCE Nick Nascati

    CONTRIBUTING EDITORS

    William Abrams; Byron Angel; Ken Bunger; Phil Barker; Robert Beattie; Rodman Burr; Steve Carpenter; Tom Desmond; Steve Haller; Peter Holl-inger; Ian Knight; Doug Johnson; Robert Mosca; Eric Ritchie; Bob Sarber; Cliff Sayre; Jim Womer; Ned Zuparko

    STAFF CARTOON 1ST: Jose N iera STAFF ILLUSTRATOR: Mike Gilbert

    STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER: Philip 0 Stearns EDITOR, SPECIAL PUBLICATIONS: Bruce Weeks

    THE COURIER DISPATCH: Robert Maclean

    THE COURIER PUBLISHING COMPANY, INC. Richard L. Bryant, President

    STAFF ILLUSTRATORS

    Alan Archambault Mike Gilbert

    DIRECTORS Richard Bryant, leo Cronin, Gloria Miceli

    THE COURIER is published approximately bi-monthly at 45 Willow Street, Brockton, MA 02401 USA. Back issues are available for $2.75 (foreign $3.00 surface, $4.50 airmail) six issue subscriptions are $10.50, USA ($12 .00 Canada & foreign surface rate; All foreign airmail , 3rd class - $25.00). All monies in US funds drawn on US banks or inter-national Postal Money Order. Subscriptions start with NEXT published issue after receipt of pay-ment.

    No responsibility is assumed for statements of f act or opinion made by the authors. No responsibility is assumed for unsoli cited manusc ripts, but all sub-missions are welcome, no query necessa ry. All submissions should contain a self-addressed STAMPED envelope large enough to return the submission. This magazine and other publications of The Courier Publishin g Company are sold with the un-derstanding that every reasonable attempt is made to deliver them safely through the mails. The Courier Publishing Comapny is not responsible for items lost in the mails. Replacements will be pro-vided at their usual cost.

    All DEALER INQUIRIES, ADVERTISING COPY AND INQUIRIES, SUBSCRIPTIONS AND AR-TICLES to THE COURIER, Box 1878, Brockton, MA

    02403 .

    Entire Contents Copyright 1981 by The Cou rier Publishing Company, Inc.

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    THE VANGUARD

    EDITOR'S NOTES

    Volume III , No. 1!!! We begin our third year a little late due to too much conventioneering on the part of The Courier Staff, but also on a positive note . For the second year in a row, THE COURIER has won the H. G. WELLS award as BEST PROFESSIONAL MAGAZINE COVERING MINIATURES! It is especially satisfying this year as our competition included such great magazines as Military Modelling, Campaigns, Wargamer's Digest, The Dragon, and Gryphon. Many thanks to the staff, the editors, and all the authors without whom it could not have happened.

    With this issue, we start our theme year of the RENAISSANCE. This in ties nicely with the fact that the WRG RENAISSANCE RULES (distributed by The Courier Publishing Co.) also won the H . G. WELLS AS BEST ALL TIME PRE-NAPOLEONIC GUNPOWDER MINIATURE RULES!

    By now most of you will realize The Courier has always tried to find ways to save a buck for its subscribers - e.g. The Supply Depot. I don' t want to sound patronizing, but we think of our subscribers as members of the same wargame club we belong to - we try to do the same for subscribers as we would for the guys we game with personally. In this regard we have been able to arrange a special price on a series of great books of special interest to historical gamers. A new selection will be available each issue. Indexes to Volumes I & II are at last available due entirely to the untireing efforts of Tom Desmond of our staff. Finally we have been able to put together a special price on all the back issues of Volume I for those of you who don't have them (and for new subscribers) - see the various ads elsewhere in this issue for more details.

    The staff of The Courier was able to attend both Pacific Origins and GenCon East. While both had many events for Historical Miniature gamers, they were obvious by their absence. Perhaps they felt that they would be out numbered by gamers from other areas of the hobby - of course this is a self-fulfilling prophecy! Ardent historical gaming buffs put in a lot of time to provide literally hundreds of historical gaming slots yet the historical gamer does not show up. It is no wonder that the figure manufacturer brings fewer and fewer historical items to these conventions! Considering that the manufacturer uses the sales history at these conventions, in part, as a guide to what he should produce and what he should drop - is it any wonder that historical figure lines are going by the board? If the historical figure gamer does not support the hobby by attending conventions; demonstrating historical gaming; buying from the dealers who CATER to the historical hob-by; by ferreting out and boycotting pirates; by supporting the hobby's magazines (make your buddy buy one rather than read yours) and by in-creasing the hobby size by nurturing new historical gamers (no matter what area of the hobby they come from) then there is no one else to blame if the hobby dies from a lack of supply. 0

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  • ARMIES & SOLDI F:tlS OF THE PIKE-AND-SHOT PERIOD

    BY DON FEATHERSTONE

    The " Pike-and-Shot" era ran roughly for about 250 years from 1450 to 1700. It em braced many positive forward steps in the art of warfare that must necessari ly be con-sidered if the battles are to be authentically re-constructed . As the period got under way, artillery and the hand-held firearm were beginning to remorselessly supersede the bow and edged weapons; it ended with the first g limpses of the " modern" so ldier in Cromwell's New Model Army, just before the invention of the bayonet rend ered the pikeman obsolete and the universal infan-tryman marched onto the battlefields of the world .

    In the 16th century, gunpowder so dominated the bat-tlefield that armour, except for the helmet and breastplate worn by heavy cavalry and pikemen, was discarded . The medieval formation of three dense " bat-tles" - blocks of mounted men and infantry - per-sisted, despite being extremely vulnerable to gunpowder weapons. This outdated system of dividing an army into " vaward"; " main-battle" and " rea rward" gradually died out as time went on and the names became meaningless; the term " wing" came into use instead of " vaward" and " rearward" although t