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GRASSHOPPER TUTORIAL 1 032612 · PDF file Grasshopper Logic Lists and Data Management __ Taken from the “Grasshopper Primer” – Andrew Payne : LIFT Architects. Main Menu Bar Similar

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  • ARCH 5550 – QuaDror: A structural support system with manifold possibilities: new, simple, strong and versatile.

    SP2012

    GRASSHOPPER TUTORIAL 1 032612

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    Grasshopper Interface Grasshopper Logic Lists and Data Management

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    Taken from the “Grasshopper Primer” – Andrew Payne : LIFT Architects.

    Main Menu Bar

    Similar to Windows menus, except for the file-brower control on the right. You can quickly switch between different loaded files by selecting them through this drop-down box.

    Component Panels

    This area exposes all component categories. All components belong to a certain category and all categories are available as unique toolbar panels. The height and width of the toolbars can be adjusted, allowing for more or fewer on-screen buttons per category. The toolbar panels themselves contain all the components that belong to that category.

    Since there are a potentially large number of these, it only shows the most recently used items. In order to see the entire collection, you have to click on the bar at the bottom of the Panel: This will pop up the category panel, which provides access to all objects. You can either click on the objects in the popup list, or you can drag directly from the list onto the canvas. Clicking on items in the category panel will place them on the toolbar for easy future reference. Clicking on buttons will not add them to the Canvas! You must drag them onto the Canvas in order to add them.

    You can also find components by name, by double-clicking anywhere on the canvas; launching a pop-up search box. Type in the name of the component you are looking for and you will see a list of parameters or components that match your request.

    The Window Title Bar

    The Editor Window title bar behaves different from most other dialogs in Microsoft Windows. Note that if you close the Editor, the Grasshopper geometry previews in the viewports will disappear, but the files won't actually be closed. The next time you run the _Grasshopper command, the window will come back in the same state with the same files loaded.

    The Canvas Toolbar

    The canvas toolbar provides quick access to a number of frequently used features. All the tools are available through the menu as well, and you can hide the toolbar if you like. (It can be re enabled from the View menu).

    The canvas toolbar exposes the following tools (from left to right):

  • ARCH 5550 – QuaDror: A structural support system with manifold possibilities: new, simple, strong and versatile.

    SP2012

    1. Open

    2. Save

    3. Zoom defaults

    4. Zoom Extents 6. Focus corners (these 4 buttons will focus on the 4 corners of the definition)

    5. Named views (exposes a menu to store and recall named views)

    6. Sketch tool

    7-11. Various Preview settings

    F: The Canvas

    This is the actual editor where you define and edit the history network. The Canvas hosts both the objects that make up the definition and some UI widgets. Objects on the canvas are usually color coded to provide feedback about their state:

    A) Parameters and components that are displayed as grey indicate that they contain no warnings or errors.

    B) Parameters and components that are displayed as red indicate that they contain an error. C) Parameter and components that are displayed as orange indicated that they contain warnings.

    The Status Bar

    The status bar provides feedback on the selection set and the major events that have occurred in the plug-in. Key information about whether or not you have any errors or warnings in your definition will be displayed here.

  • ARCH 5550 – QuaDror: A structural support system with manifold possibilities: new, simple, strong and versatile.

    SP2012

    Viewport Preview Feedback:

    A) Blue feedback geometry means you are currently picking it with the mouse.

    B) Green geometry in the viewport belongs to a component, which is currently selected.

    C) Red geometry in the viewport belongs to a component, which is currently unselected.

    D) Point geometry is drawn as a cross rather than a rectangle to distinguish it from Rhino point objects.

    Grasshopper Definition Objects

    A Grasshopper definition can consist of many different kinds of objects, but in order to get started you only need to familiarize yourself with two of them:

    • Parameters

    • Components

    Parameters contain data, meaning that they store stuff. Components contain actions, meaning that they

  • ARCH 5550 – QuaDror: A structural support system with manifold possibilities: new, simple, strong and versatile.

    SP2012

    do stuff. The following image shows some of the possible objects you are likely to encounter in a Grasshopper definition:

    A) A parameter that contains data. Since there is no wire coming out the left side of the object, it does not inherit its data from elsewhere. Parameters that do not contain errors or warnings are thin, black blocks with horizontal text.

    B) A parameter that contains no data. Any object that fails to collect data is considered suspect in an Explicit History Definition since it appears to be wasting everyone's time and money. Therefore, all parameters (when freshly added) are orange, to indicate they do not contain any data and have thus no functional effect on the outcome of the History Solution. Once a parameter inherits or defines data, it will become black.

    C) A selected component. All selected objects have a green sheen to them.

    D) A regular component.

    E) A component containing warnings. Since a component is likely to contain a number of input and output parameters, it is never clear which particular object generated the warning by just looking at the component. There may even be multiple sources of warnings. You'll have to use the context menu in order to track down the problems. Note that warnings do not necessarily have to be fixed. They may be completely legit.

    F) A component containing errors.

    G) A connection. Connections always appear between an output and an input parameter. There is no limit to how many connections any particular parameter may contain, but it is not allowed to create a setup with cyclical/recursive connections.

    Component Parts

    A component usually requires data in order to perform its actions, and it usually comes up with a result.

  • ARCH 5550 – QuaDror: A structural support system with manifold possibilities: new, simple, strong and versatile.

    SP2012

    That is why most components have a set of nested parameters, referred to as Input and Output parameters respectively. Input parameters are positioned along the left side, output parameters along the right side:

    A) The three input parameters of the Division component. By default, parameter names are always extremely short. You can rename each parameter as you please.

    B) The Division component area (usually contains the name of the component)

    C) The three output parameters of the Division component. When you hover your mouse over the individual parts of a Component object, you'll see different tooltips that indicate the particular type of the (sub)object currently under the mouse. Tooltips are quite informative since they tell you both the type and the data of individual parameters:

    Using Context Popup Menus

    All objects on the Canvas have their own context menus that expose most of the features for that particular component. Components are a bit trickier, since they also expose (in a cascading style) all the menus of the sub-objects they contain. For example, if a component turns orange it means that it, or

  • ARCH 5550 – QuaDror: A structural support system with manifold possibilities: new, simple, strong and versatile.

    SP2012

    some parameter affiliated with the component, generated a warning. If you want to find out what went wrong, you need to use the component context menu

    Here you see the main component menu, with the cascading menu for the "R" input parameter. The menu usually starts with an editable text field that lists the name of the object in question. You can change the name to something more descriptive, but by default all names are extremely short to minimize screen- real-estate usage.

    The second item in the menu (Preview flag) indicates whether or not the geometry produced /defined by this object will be visible in the Rhino viewports. Switching off preview for components that do not contain vital information will speed up both the Rhino viewport frame rate and the time taken for a History Solution (in case meshing is involved).

    If the preview for a parameter or a component is disabled, it will be drawn with a faint white hatch. Not all parameters/components can be drawn in viewports (numbers for example) and in these cases the Preview item is usually missing.

    The context menu for the "R" input parameter contains the orange warning icon, which in turn contains a list (just 1 warning in this case) of all the warnings that were generated by this parameter.

    Types of Data

    Parameters are only used to store information, but most parameters can store two different kinds; Volatile and Persistent data.

    Volatile data is inherited from one or more source parameters and is destroyed (i.e. recollected) whenever a new solution starts.

    Persistent data is data which has been specific

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