Gender Pay Gap Reporting Measuring Our Gender Pay Gap How we measure and results Combined Gender Pay

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  • Gender Pay Gap Reporting

  • Creating Opportunity to Reach Potential

    A Culture of Inclusion

    At PageGroup our Purpose is to ‘change lives for people through creating opportunity to reach potential’. As an inclusive, global organisation we are determined to be as diverse as the markets in which we work and the customers we serve. Gender equality and a focus on the gender pay gap are key to that inclusion.

    We have worked hard over recent years to drive improvements in diversity across the Group. Our people tell us they like working at PageGroup because, as well as clear career paths and progression, we’re passionate about the things they care about. We’re proud that diversity and inclusion is an area where we see the most positive sentiment in our employee survey. In 2019 it was the third highest scoring category (82% favourable) and responses to the question ‘At PageGroup all employees, regardless of their differences, are treated fairly’ showed a 5% point increase over 2017.

    Like many companies while we have a gender pay gap driven by having more men than women in senior positions across our business, we do not consider this to be a result of any equal pay issues. The gender pay gap measures the difference between the average earnings of men and women regardless of their roles, whereas equal pay relates to ensuring women and men are paid equally for equal work. We are fully committed to equal pay in PageGroup and have a gender-neutral approach to pay across all levels.

    We are pleased with the progress we’ve made in gender diversity over recent years, but know we still have work to do in closing the gender pay gap. The organic nature of our business, with senior employees almost always being promoted from within, means this will take time but our efforts are focused on accelerating the change.

    We pride ourselves on leading our industry in promoting an inclusive culture and providing a working environment where all our employees feel valued and heard.

    Diversity and inclusion, including gender equality, is embedded across PageGroup, from attracting employees and on-boarding through career progression, succession planning, recognition and reward, performance management and employee communication and engagement. In 2019, for the first time, all our Managing Directors globally had gender diversity targets as part of their bonus objectives.

    Our commitment to inclusion within PageGroup is supported through a wide variety of initiatives, networks and activities. Outside our business, we are proud to lead the way with public recognition through awards and the commitments we have made.

    We know we have more to do to improve our gender pay gap and we are confident we will continue to see positive results as we embed and improve the broad range of activities and actions we have in place to further that ambition.

    Gary James Group HR Director

    Sarah Kirk Global Diversity & Inclusion Director

  • 2018 Change

    Measuring Our Gender Pay Gap

    How we measure and results

    Combined Gender Pay Gap Results (includes PageGroup employees and temporary workers at client companies)

    This is the third year we have reported on the Gender Pay Gap and it reflects:

    Ū The mean and median Gender Pay Gap as at 5 April 2019

    Ū The mean and median Gender Bonus Gap based on the 12 months prior to the point of

    analysis on 5 April 2019

    We are required to report on results which include our own employees in the UK as well as

    temporary workers for whom we manage payroll.

    We have full responsibility for the pay levels of our own employees but not for the pay rates of

    temporary workers, which are set by our clients.

    Gender Pay Gap

    Bonus Gender Pay Gap

    Proportion receiving a bonus payment

    2019

    19%

    50%

    30%

    Mean

    Mean

    Female

    14%

    31%

    43%

    Median

    Median

    Male

    21%

    51%

    36%

    Mean

    Mean

    Female

    16%

    36%

    47%

    Median

    Median

    Male

    -2%

    -1%

    -6%

    -2%

    -5%

    -4% Female Male

    Mean

    Mean

    Median

    Median

    Mean figure = the difference between the average of men’s and women’s pay Median figure = the difference between the midpoints in the ranges of men’s and women’s pay

  • 2018 Change

    PageGroup Gender Pay Gap Results (only PageGroup Employees)

    We also choose to publish results which relate solely to our own people. This group does not

    include the temporary workers whose pay is set by our clients, so it gives us a true picture of our

    internal gender balance. It helps us track and measure the outcomes of our focus and gives an

    internal benchmark that we can fully influence.

    Gender Pay Gap

    Bonus Gender Pay Gap

    Proportion receiving a bonus payment

    2019

    18%

    51%

    70%

    Mean

    Mean

    Female

    16%

    31%

    80%

    Median

    Median

    Male

    23%

    53%

    72%

    Mean

    Mean

    Female

    23%

    33%

    80%

    Median

    Median

    Male

    -5%

    -2%

    -2%

    -7%

    -2%

    0% Female Male

    Mean

    Mean

    Median

    Median

    Mean figure = the difference between the average of men’s and women’s pay Median figure = the difference between the midpoints in the ranges of men’s and women’s pay

  • Understanding the Gap

    Combined Results: PageGroup Results:

    We have seen encouraging, positive

    movement in nearly all the required

    reporting metrics. The Mean Gender

    Pay Gap has reduced to 19% from

    21% and the Median Gender Pay Gap to

    14% from 16%.

    There has been an increase in the

    proportion of females across all quartiles.

    The upper quartile band represents the

    top 25% of people when ranked by pay.

    Females represent 45% of this quartile,

    up 3% from 2018. The upper middle

    quartile also shows an increase, up 3% to

    60% female. The lower and lower middle

    quartiles are both 63% female.

    Bonus payments show positive movement

    with a Mean Bonus Gender Pay Gap of

    50%, down from 54% last year, and a

    median bonus pay gap of 31%, down from

    36% in 2018.

    The one metric which has not improved

    is the proportion of females receiving

    a bonus, down to 30% from 36%.

    However, there was also a fall in the

    proportion of males receiving

    a bonus (to 43% from 47%)

    demonstrating that fewer

    people overall received a

    bonus payment in 2019.

    These combined results

    include a large population

    (more than 55%) of

    contractors who are outside

    the control and influence of our

    approach to our own people at

    PageGroup.

    We have seen improvements in the Gender Pay Gap for

    both pay and bonus. For pay, the Mean Gender Pay Gap

    has reduced by 5% to 18%. The Median Gender Pay Gap

    is down 7% to 16%.

    This is a reflection of the work we have done to support

    women within our inclusive culture, and to actively improve

    the proportion of females in senior leadership positions

    within our business. Given the organic nature of promotions

    at PageGroup, this focus is key and while there is clearly

    more to be done, this is a solid improvement within

    one year.

    The bonus pay gap has improved by 2% but is still

    significant at 51% for the Mean Bonus Gender Pay Gap.

    This figure is impacted by the number of male Executive

    Board members and functional leads on the UK payroll.

    The Median Bonus Gender Pay Gap is far lower at 31% for

    2019, also a 2% improvement on 2018.

    The gender split of our own people is now 52% female

    and 48% male. This ratio is fairly consistent across the

    pay quartiles although we still have a larger proportion of

    females in the lower and lower middle quartiles. The upper

    quartile is 40% female so needs improvement compared to

    the 52% in the total population. Compared to 2018,

    that figure has improved from 37%.

    The one measure we have seen fall is

    the proportion of women receiving

    a bonus, with a drop from 72%

    to 70% compared to the figure

    for men staying at 80%.

    There are several factors to

    consider for this performance-

    related measure, including the

    proportionately higher number

    of new starters who are female

    and therefore not yet qualifying for

    a bonus.

  • Closing the Gap

    We recognise that we have a Gender Pay Gap at PageGroup and it exists for a couple of reasons.

    The organisation is headquartered in the UK, several Executive Board members are on the UK payroll and are therefore included in the UK figures. This

    Executive Board, coupled with the lower proportion of women holding the Group’s most senior leadership

    roles means we have fewer females in the upper quartile. We also have a higher proportion of females

    in the lower two quartiles of pay.

    We operate an organ