FRIM TOWARDS REDUCING ITS CARBON FOOTPRINT 2013-10-10آ  FRIM TOWARDS REDUCING ITS CARBON FOOTPRINT Dr

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  • FRIM TOWARDS REDUCING ITS CARBON FOOTPRINT Dr Gan Kee Seng ganks@frim.gov.my & Azharizan Mohd Norizan

    ABOUT THE AUTHOR Dr Gan Kee Seng is currently the Head of the Green Technology Programme, Forest Products Division, Forest Research Institute Malaysia (FRIM).

    Processing of wood requires fuel energy that emits GHG

    Fire door testing is one of the services offerred that requires high

    fuel consumption

    Focus article

    Editorial Board FRIM in Focus (FIF) is distributed free of charge upon request. We welcome feedback on any of the FIF articles.

    Address comments and enquiries to:

    Cover photo: An aerial view of Forest Research Institute Malaysia (FRIM) campus. (Photo credit: Asmar Hassan)

    The Editor & Writer of FRIM In Focus Forest Research Institute Malaysia (FRIM) 52109 Kepong, Selangor DE, Malaysia

    Telephone : +603-6279 7501 | Facsimile : +603-6273 1076 E-mail : idasuraini@frim.gov.my | Website : www.frim.gov.my Design & Printing : Concept Press Sdn Bhd

    Advisors Dato’ Dr Abdul Latif Mohmod Dr Mohamed Nor Mohd Yusoff

    Technical Editor Mohamad Zaki Mohd Isa

    Editor & Writer Ida Suraini Abd Shukor

    ABOUT THE MAIN AUTHOR Dr Gan Kee Seng is currently the Head of the Green Technology Programme, Forest Products Division, Forest Research Institute Malaysia (FRIM).

    Climate change will dominate every aspect of human lives in many years to come as non-renewable resources are continuously being depleted. Activities that consume natural resources particularly fuel, emit greenhouse gases (GHG) that are the main cause of global warming. Various green initiatives are being undertaken by concerned global citizen to reduce emission with the hope of slowing down global warming.

    In order to effectively address GHG emission, it is essential to understand which activities produce GHG and the scale of emission for each activity. The GHG emissions to the atmosphere of an individual or group are referred to as the carbon footprint.

    Forest Research Institute Malaysia (FRIM), a R&D organisation with 900 staff members is working on various aspects of tropical rainforest research and services. FRIM aims to have as little negative impact as possible to the environment when carrying out its activities. As a R&D organisation, FRIM’s main contribution to GHG emissions is from energy use. This assumption allows FRIM

    to focus only on CO2 rather than other GHGs including CH4, N2O, SF4, NF5, perfluorocarbon and hydofluorocarbon.

    The first step to effectively reduce energy-related CO2 emission is to quantify how much FRIM emits through various activities. FRIM carbon footprint for years 2011 and 2012 were 5332 ton and 4701 ton carbon dioxide equivalents (CO2-e) respectively. There was an 11.8% reduction in the total carbon emission in year 2012 compared to 2011. The reduction was contributed significantly by less air travelling by researchers both internationally and locally. However, reduction in the total carbon emission from electricity usage was insignificant.

    FRIM will take proactive steps to reduce her carbon emission. Average carbon footprint for the last two years will be used as a baseline or reference emission for future initiatives to reduce emission. The various contributory factors will be re-evaluated in greater details and targeted for reduction through various strategies such as improved efficiency, prevention of leakages and reduction on avoidable travelling. Photos: Asmar Hassan

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  • Focus article

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    Urban dwellers often look for green spaces for recreational activities such as walking, jogging, cycling and picnicking. Some, however prefer nature for leisure and relaxation purposes. More than often visiting green areas such as parks and gardens help urbanites improve physical and mental health by reducing their stress problems. Urban green spaces also help promote social contact amongst people in the neighbourhood.

    One of the few established green spaces near Kuala Lumpur is the Forest Research Institute Malaysia (FRIM) which is a popular spot amongst local communities, foreigners and nature lovers. FRIM with its lush green surroundings is an ideal location for recreational and educational activities. As an ecotourism site, FRIM promotes important messages for conservation by allowing visitors to learn from its biodiversity resources.

    FRIM is also a significant research centre that provides knowledge and technology to scientists, as well as information to the general public. During the year 1926, the campus was established as a site for plantation trials, at the time where most of its grounds were in the form of degraded forests, vegetable farms and abandoned mining pools. Nevertheless, the 80 year-old green area is now a renowned natural site for ecotourism with its own living museum of tropical forest species. FRIM forest, thematic arboreta and gardens such as the Bambusetum, the Dipterocarp Arboretum, the Non- Dipterocarp Arboretum, the Ethnobotanical Garden and the newly developed Kepong Botanical Garden form the vegetated area measuring 502 ha from the total 544 ha of FRIM land area.

    In 2012, FRIM received more than 680,000 visitors and the figure is expected to increase in 2013. With the formation of ‘Friends of FRIM’, the nearby communities especially, are encouraged to join FRIM in its efforts to safeguard and protect the forest and green areas.

    The successful establishment of FRIM forests spreads the message that people are capable of nurturing the environment. Enjoying nature at FRIM motivates communities to continue conserving the lush greeneries so that they can reap the advantages of conservation for the benefit of future generations.

    FRIM is an attraction to both the young and old

    Delivering conservation messages to students

    ABOUT THE MAIN AUTHOR Ahmad Azaruddin Mohd Noor is a Research Officer at the Ecotourism and Urban Forestry Programme, Forestry and Environment Division, FRIM.

    Ahmad Azaruddin Mohd Noor azarudin@frim.gov.my & Dr Noor Azlin Yahya

    A GREEN LEGACY FOR FUTURE GENERATION

    A Quarterly of the Forest Research Institute Malaysia September 2013 FRIM in FOCUS2 A Quarterly of the Forest Research Institute Malaysia

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  • Focus article

    A study was carried out recently to quantify the aboveground carbon stock for the forested area of Forest Research Institute Malaysia (FRIM) campus. Data for this study was obtained using satellite images called Phased Array L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) from the Japanese Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) and a set of ground measurement data. The study covered the entire 544 ha of FRIM area, out of which 502 ha is covered with forest.

    The estimated aboveground carbon stock within the forested area was between 12.95±5.45 and 284.65±5.45 t C/ha with the mean of 96.80 t C/ha. Total carbon stock for the entire forested area of

    FOREST CARBON MAPPING AT FRIM Hamdan Omar hamdanomar@frim.gov.my

    ABOUT THE AUTHOR Hamdan Omar is a Research Officer at the Geoinformation Programme, Forestry and Environment Division, FRIM. He is currently active in a number of research projects relating to the carbon stock assessments in Malaysia's forest ecosystems by using spatial technologies, in addition to forests roles in combating climate change. He is also pursuing his PhD in the field of forest engineering and operations at Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM). His work is mostly concentrated on the use of remotely sensed data in assessing forests biomass and carbon stock.

    Low carbon Medium carbon High carbon

    Distribution of carbon stock at FRIM

    502 ha on the other hand was estimated at 56,874.9 t C, which is equal to 208,541.3 t CO2.

    This study is useful for carbon accounting and carbon credit, especially when dealing with climate change related issues. The value of carbon stock will be the baseline information for implementing the Reducing Emission from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD) projects. The carbon stock value is also useful for conservation and management of FRIM campus and its surrounding areas.

    It is also possible to replicate the approach introduced by this study at the national level for forest carbon mapping purposes in addition to monitoring the changes caused by deforestation and forest degradation. The advancements on remote sensing and spatial technologies are expected to benefit the government and the community as a whole.

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  • ABOUT THE AUTHOR Dr Rushdan Ibrahim is a Senior Research Officer at the Pulp and Paper Programme, FRIM. He obtained his PhD in Paper Science from University of Manchester, UK; MSc in Wood Industrial Technology from Universiti Putra Malaysia and BSc in Forestry from University of Montana, USA. His specialisation is on pulp and paper. He has published and presented 130 technical papers, conducted 25 consultancy works, won 24 innovation awards and has three patent pendings.

    Food container, industrial packaging and medical utensil in Malaysia are generally made from plastics, eithe