February 2015 Black History Month

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  • H.O.P.E. PUBLICATION, FEBRUARY 2015 ISSUE

    H.O.P.E. Heartbeat of P.U.L.S.E. Embodied

    Black History Month

    WEEKLY MEETINGS TUESDAYS @ 8:00 PM UNIVERSITY UNION

    P.U.L.S.E. IS AN SA CHARTERED ORGANIZATION ON BINGHAMTON UNIVERSITYS CAMPUS THAT AIMS

    TO EDUCATE, ELEVATE, AND EMPOWER WOMEN OF COLOR, HOWEVER WE ARE NOT EXCLUSIVE. TO ACHIEVE THIS, WE PROVIDE A SAFE HAVEN TO

    OPENLY DISCUSS ISSUES THAT AFFECT US SUCH AS GENDER, SEX, AND SELF-ESTEEM AS WELL AS

    PROVIDE NETWORKING OPPORTUNITIES TO BUILD A COMMUNITY. FURTHERMORE, WE STRIVE TO WORK TOWARDS THE PROSPERITY OF WOMEN

    THROUGH VOLUNTEER EFFORTS IN THE BINGHAMTON COMMUNITY.

    PAGE 2

    PAGE 4

    PAGE 6

    PAGE 8

    MEET OUR INTERNS

    HOW I KNEW I WAS BLACK

    5TH ANNUAL BREAST CANCER WALK

    PAGE 11 HEART DISEASE AWARENESS

    DO YOU HAVE A DREAM?

  • H.O.P.E. PUBLICATION, FEBRUARY 2015 ISSUE

  • H.O.P.E. PUBLICATION, FEBRUARY 2015 ISSUE

    Ashley Mitchell President

    Lezlie Parker Vice President

    Brianna Infante Publications Coordinator

    Toni-Ann Black Co-Public Relations

    Hilary Hernandez Co-Public Relations

    Ariel Hunt Community Service Events Coordinator

    Claudia Wright Secretary

    Ashley Duran Fundraiser

    Cassandre Lolo Treasurer

    Rahilou Diallo Educational Coordinator

    Melinda Momplaisir Senior Advisor

  • H.O.P.E. PUBLICATION, FEBRUARY 2015 ISSUE

    I have a dream that there will be a world with no fatal diseases, violence and mental disabilities. I just want to live in a world full of peace, love, and

    happiness. -Claudia Wright

    I have a dream that one day our great and beautiful nation will come together as one and fix the mess that we have left behind in our tracks. It

    seems to me that everyone has forgotten what our great and beautiful nation is all about. Being free does not being violent and cruel to your

    environment, your peers, or your world. This all just goes back to the saying, You dont know what youve got until its gone.

    -Toni-Ann Black

    I have a dream that one day all races, genders, sexual preferences and economic levels will be equally respected. That one day my future sons will

    not fear police officers and officers will respect their black skin. That my daughters bodies will be as equally respected as my sons' and that their No

    will be enough. -Melinda Momplaisir

  • H.O.P.E. PUBLICATION, FEBRUARY 2015 ISSUE

    I have a dream to become a Pediatric Nurse and further my degree as a Nurse Practitioner. Working with kids is something that is close to my

    heart. I hope to bring a new aspect to nursing. -Ariel Hunt

    I have a dream that we will one day live in a nation were we are not surmised by our gender or color of our skin. I have a dream that one day I

    will not be judged because I am a woman but by the content of my character. I have a dream that one day there will be complete equality for all

    human beings. I had this dream yesterday. I have this dream today. Ill have this dream tomorrow.

    -Ashley Duran

    I have a dream that women will treat each other like women. Not degrade each other for little differences such as skin color or hair texture. Every

    woman is beautiful in their own way, no one should be singled out or put down for being different. Difference is beauty. It creates diversity.

    -Lezlie Parker

  • H.O.P.E. PUBLICATION, FEBRUARY 2015 ISSUE

    HISTORIAN/SA REPRESENTATIVE INTERN Year: Transfer Junior Major: Psychology Minor: History This semester, I am looking forward to accomplishing everything I set my heart into, despite any pitfalls to keep me from moving forward.

    ELISA RIOS

    MARIAM TRAOREFUNDRAISER INTERN

    Year: Freshman Major: Economics and Sociology This semester I look forward to

    earning a high GPA, going to banquets, and of course, attending great

    P.U.L.S.E. GBs.

  • H.O.P.E. PUBLICATION, FEBRUARY 2015 ISSUE

    FUNDRAISER INTERN Year: Sophomore Major: Chemistry This semester, I am looking forward to being accepted into SUNY Oswego's Costa Rica study abroad program. It has always been a dream for me to travel the world and I finally have the opportunity to do so over the summer.

    CHRISTINE MAGANA

    JASLYN ROJASPUBLICATIONS COORDINATOR INTERN Year: Sophomore Major: Psychology This semester I am looking forward to mastering new crafts.

    JOYCE SOTOHISTORIAN/SA REPRESENTATIVE INTERN Year: Junior Major: Integrative Neuroscience

  • H.O.P.E. PUBLICATION, FEBRUARY 2015 ISSUE

    A Personal AnecdoteWritten by: Onyx Ramirez

    Part 1: DenialMy mom tells me that my first solid food ever was tostones dipped in Catch, (so that confirms my dominican-ness). But my blackness? My blackness was swept under the rug and hidden behind phrases such as trigea, morenita, jab, and high yellow. Terms like these were too often used to disguise my

    African roots, (although the roots that grow out of my head, the ones that I grew up hating shout my origins loud and proud). My family (maybe yours too)

    put other Dominicans down; the ones that have the bad hair and the ones whose parents didnt marry up. These customs arent exclusive to

    Dominicans, however. They are found all throughout the diaspora and their origins stem from survival. Nevertheless, if you had asked me 5, 4, 3 years ago

    if I was black, I would say No. Im Dominican, even though I now know that those things are not mutually exclusive.

    Part 2: Anger What do you mean Im black? That doesnt make sense, Im Hispanic. Sure,

    the first Africans of the slave trade were brought to Hispaniola but that doesnt mean anything. Those people all kind of just disappeared magically. They have nothing to do with me and I have nothing to do with them. Yeah Im brown but Im not dark enough to be black, right? My hair is curly and my nose is

    wide and I know for sure Im not white, but I cant be black. Spanish was my first language after all. Yeah were all fighting that good fight and ~equality~ but

    at the end of the day, were dierent. Sure I dont have much in common, culturally, with Central and South Americans but were all one peoples and I have pigeonholed myself and I have a box and that box is labeled LATINA

    and I like that box. Its comfy and I heard that Im supposed to be a good dancer, which is nice.

  • H.O.P.E. PUBLICATION, FEBRUARY 2015 ISSUE

    Part 3: BargainingYes, in retrospect, I guess I do have African roots and thats nice and dandy.

    But Im not black.

    Part 4: Depression Wow okay, I guess Im black.

    My mom (who is much darker than me) was shunned by my dads side of the family (who are much lighter than me) because she was dark but what am I supposed to do about that? Yes, it hurts when my aunts make some passive aggressive comments about me looking ghetto when I leave my hair curly.

    Yes, my family is super racist but does that mean Im supposed to fault them? These ideals and practices arent my family jewels. I dont cherish them. They

    havent been passed down generation to generation like your aunt Gwenevieres antique china (that was acquired under some pretty sketchy circumstances) because Dominicans love being racist. These are survival

    instincts! If we try hard enough, if we pray hard enough, if we lighten the race enough maybe well be able to blend in with white folk! Then maybe one day, someone will claim us. Thats the thing about the Diaspora. Were not one and were not the other and nobody wants you. Were not a group that

    stands at a united front against racism and that was done on purpose. Colonization did much more behind the scenes work than we give it credit for, and we have to give credit where credit is due! Along with the physical

    enslavement of 12 MILLION people came the mental enslavement. One very basic example of this is the house slave situation. If you were lighter you got

    to be a house slave, if you were darker you were a field slave. This life is survival of the fittest, and when being black in the Dominican Republic could literally get you murdered in the 30s (look up the Parsley massacre), I see why

    my family tells me to straighten my hair on Sundays. When I look at my grandparents (some darker than me and some lighter than me) I feel bad for them because they have so far distanced themselves from reality and its not

    their fault. At least, not really. This is not to say that I agree with or am justifying their I no black, papi attitude theyre wrong and I get that.

  • H.O.P.E. PUBLICATION, FEBRUARY 2015 ISSUE

    YEAR: SophomoreMAJORS: Political Science,

    Sociology, LACAS (triple major.)

    I am currently an Intern for LASU, I am on the Student

    Conduct Board, and I am the VP of Public Aairs for Smith

    Hall of the Hinman Community.

    Part 5: Acceptance However, I can (on an intellectual level) understand why everything went down the way it did. There are systems in play that perpetuate

    this kind of thinking and if I could detail every one right here I would. But I can say a few things for certain. Being black doesnt mean I cant be a Latina. At this point Im no more one than the other, and being

    Latino means something dierent for every Latin American country. To me, that means dropping some s here and there and eating plantains. I am SIMULTANEOUSLY Latina and Black, which is mind blowing to a lot of people because apparently Im only allowed to be one thing and I

    have to choose because my complexities (and yours!) make others uncomfortable. For a minute, seriously look at me, though. Theres no denying this. Too often am I confused for African American for this to

    be a casual mistake. This conversation isnt over but if youre unsatisfied with anything I said, I love talking about this.

  • H.O.P.E. PUBLICATION, FEBRUARY 2015 ISSUE

  • H.O.P.E. PUBLICATION, FEBRUARY 2015 ISSUE

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