FASH 15 textiles yarn processing. most apparel & interior fabrics produced from yarns yarn: continuous strand of textile fibers, filaments or materials.

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    17-Dec-2015

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<ul><li> Slide 1 </li> <li> FASH 15 textiles yarn processing </li> <li> Slide 2 </li> <li> most apparel &amp; interior fabrics produced from yarns yarn: continuous strand of textile fibers, filaments or materials in a form suitable for knitting or weaving or otherwise intertwining to form a textile fabric </li> <li> Slide 3 </li> <li> filament yarns made from manufactured fibersexcept tiny percentage of filament silk grouping of filaments with the addition of twist creates filament yarn </li> <li> Slide 4 </li> <li> yarn name: outdoor UV resistant thread yarn type: multi-filament twist direction: Z amount of twist: high yarn appearance: standard filament fiber content: 100% polyester end uses: filament yarn #1 </li> <li> Slide 5 </li> <li> yarn name: elastic sewing thread yarn type: corespun filament twist direction: none amount of twist: none yarn appearance: braided fiber content: 42% polyester 58% rubber end uses: filament yarn #2 </li> <li> Slide 6 </li> <li> filament yarnssmooth-filament yarns uniform as they come from the spinneret more luster than spun yarndepending upon delusterant &amp; amount of twist no protruding ends do not lint resist pilling shed soil strength depends upon: strength of individual fibers number of filaments in yarn </li> <li> Slide 7 </li> <li> yarn name: thread yarn type: filament twist direction: Z amount of twist: high yarn appearance: Standard filament fiber content: 100% polyester end uses: smooth-filament yarn #3 </li> <li> Slide 8 </li> <li> filament yarnsmonofilament yarns primarily for technical useslow cost, high durability consist of single coarse-filament fiber end uses: sewing thread fishing line fruit &amp; vegetable bags nets metallic fibers used as monofilament yarnssparkle, minimize static electricity, clean-room apparel &amp; technical applications </li> <li> Slide 9 </li> <li> yarn name: quilters invisible nylon thread yarn type: filament twist direction: none amount of twist: none yarn appearance: standard filament fiber content: 100% nylon end uses: monofilament yarn #4 </li> <li> Slide 10 </li> <li> yarn name: metallic yarn type: corespun filament twist direction: none amount of twist: none yarn appearance: standard filament fiber content: 60% nylon 40% polyester end uses: monofilament yarn #5 </li> <li> Slide 11 </li> <li> filament yarnstape and network yarns tape inexpensive yarns produced by extruded polymer films coarse and usually used in carpet backing, rope, cord, fishnets, bagging and interiors support fabrics network made of fibers connected in a network arrangement bulkier &amp; less dense than tape yarns used in technical products in which bulk &amp; low density more important than high strength </li> <li> Slide 12 </li> <li> yarn name: tape yarn yarn type: extruded polymer film twist direction: none amount of twist: none yarn appearance: flat, lustrous fiber content: 100% polyester end uses: tape yarn #6 </li> <li> Slide 13 </li> <li> filament yarnsbulk yarns processed to have greater covering power or apparent volume than that of conventional yarn sometimes referred to as bulk-continuous-filament (BCF) yarns bulking gives filaments aesthetic properties of spun yarns </li> <li> Slide 14 </li> <li> filament yarnsbulk yarns methods of adding texture/bulk: false-twist process draw-texturing stuffer box air-jet knit-deknit </li> <li> Slide 15 </li> <li> yarn name: cording yarn type: spun twist direction: none amount of twist: none yarn appearance: braided fiber content: 100% polyolefin end uses: bulk yarn #7 </li> <li> Slide 16 </li> <li> yarn name: boucle yarn type: spun twist direction: S amount of twist: low yarn appearance: texturized fiber content: 100% acrylic end uses: bulk yarn #8 </li> <li> Slide 17 </li> <li> filament yarnsspun yarns continuous strands of staple fibers held together in some waytwist generally used characteristics: fuzzy surface greater amount of twist than filament yarns short fibers that pull apart more comfortable on skin than smooth-filament low-twisttrap air/insulate high-twistair permeability reduced/wind resistant </li> <li> Slide 18 </li> <li> participation activity: spun yarns pick up a spinner tool &amp; some fiber watch the instructor as she demonstrates the spinning method that we will be using try your hand at spinning your fiber at the conclusion of the lecture, answer the following questions: how easy was this method of spinning? what would have made it easier? (fiber type &amp; length, fiber processing, tools, practice, etc) is your yarn uniform? how could you have made it more uniform? what did this process teach you? </li> <li> Slide 19 </li> <li> filament yarnsprocessing staple fibers opening loosens: fibers from compacted bales cleans: removes short fibers, soil, plant debris, &amp; other foreign matter blends: from several bales, achieves more uniform quality carding partially aligns fibers &amp; forms them into a soft, very weak rope of fibers called a carded sliver carding machinerevolving cylinder with short wire teeth that remove trash &amp; naps http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HfXXAMu35FI </li> <li> Slide 20 </li> <li> filament yarnsprocessing staple fibers drawing increases parallelism of fibers &amp; combines several carded or combed slivers into a drawn sliver combing aligns long-staple fibers in a parallel arrangement removes short fiberscombed sliver more uniform in length roving reduces the drawn sliver, increases parallel alignment &amp; inserts a small amount of twist http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=97qEHNS6UEU </li> <li> Slide 21 </li> <li> filament yarnsprocessing staple fibers spinning one of oldest manufacturing arts advances in engineering &amp; technology have increased speed &amp; quantity http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7gXTWgMeMgI </li> <li> Slide 22 </li> <li> yarn name: thread yarn type: spun twist direction: Z amount of twist: high yarn appearance: silk finishmercerized fiber content: 100% cotton end uses: spun yarn #9 </li> <li> Slide 23 </li> <li> yarn name: spun single yarn type: spun twist direction: S amount of twist: medium yarn appearance: carded wool fiber content: 100% Peruvian wool end uses: spun yarn #10 </li> <li> Slide 24 </li> <li> fiber blends blend an intimate mixture of fibers of different generic type, composition, length, diameter, or color spun togetherfibers cannot be separated mixture refers to yarns of different types within a fabric; one type possibly used as warp while one used as weft can be separated combination ply yarns are usedat least one strand of a ply yarn is of different generic fiber type from the other strands </li> <li> Slide 25 </li> <li> why fiber blends? 1.to produce fabrics with better combination of performance characteristics 2.to improve spinning, weaving &amp; finishing efficiency 3.to obtain better texture, hand or fabric appearance 4.to minimize fabric cost 5.to obtain cross-dyed or unique color effects </li> <li> Slide 26 </li> <li> yarn name: 4-ply yarn type: spun twist direction: S amount of twist: medium yarn appearance: carded woolen fiber content: 86% acrylic 10% wool 4% rayon end uses: blended yarn #11 </li> <li> Slide 27 </li> <li> yarn name: textured yarn type: combination twist direction: Z amount of twist: medium yarn appearance: texturized fiber content: 52% acrylic 48% nylon end uses: blended yarn #12 </li> <li> Slide 28 </li> <li> yarn name: hand quilting thread yarn type: spun &amp; filament twist direction: Z amount of twist: high yarn appearance: combed fiber content: 68% polyester (core) 32% cotton end uses: combination yarn #13 </li> <li> Slide 29 </li> <li> yarn name: 4 ply with metallic yarn type: spun &amp; monofilament twist direction: Z amount of twist: medium yarn appearance: combed fiber content: 97% mercerized cotton 3% metallic filament end uses: combination yarn #14 </li> <li> Slide 30 </li> <li> environmental concerns and sustainability hearing protection needed for workers of rotors used in false-twist texturing process opening generates large quantities of dust breathing issues for workers opening, carding &amp; combing produce significant waste now sold to specialists who produce yarns &amp; other fibers products plant debris &amp; soil sold to gardeners for compost </li> <li> Slide 31 </li> <li> participation activity: spun yarns at the conclusion of the lecture, answer the following questions: how easy was this method of spinning? what would have made it easier? (fiber type &amp; length, fiber processing, tools, practice, etc) is your yarn uniform? how could you have made it more uniform? what did this process teach you? </li> </ul>

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