Eur cvd stats

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<ol><li> 1. European cardiovascular disease statistics 1 European cardiovascular disease statistics 2000 edition Compiled by: Mike Rayner and Sophie Petersen British Heart Foundation Health Promotion Research Group Department of Public Health University of Oxford Institute of Health Sciences Old Road Headington Oxford OX3 7LF www.dphpc.ox.ac.uk/bhfhprg </li><li> 2. European cardiovascular disease statistics 2 </li><li> 3. European cardiovascular disease statistics 3 Contents Page Foreword Summary Introduction 1. Mortality Table 1.1 Total numbers of deaths by cause and sex, latest available year Figure 1.1a Deaths by cause, men, latest available year, Europe Figure 1.1b Deaths by cause, women, latest available year, Europe Figure 1.1c Deaths by cause, men, latest available year, EU Figure 1.1d Deaths by cause, women, latest available year, EU Table 1.2 Deaths under 75 by cause and sex, latest available year Figure 1.2a Deaths under 75 by cause, men, latest available year, Europe Figure 1.2b Deaths under 75 by cause, women, latest available year, Europe Figure 1.2c Deaths under 75 by cause, men, latest available year, EU Figure 1.2d Deaths under 75 by cause, women, latest available year, EU Table 1.3 Deaths under 65 by cause and sex, latest available year Figure 1.3a Deaths under 65 by cause, men, latest available year, Europe Figure 1.3b Deaths under 65 by cause, women, latest available year, Europe Figure 1.3c Deaths under 65 by cause, men, latest available year, EU Figure 1.3d Deaths under 65 by cause, women, latest available year, EU Table 1.4 Age-standardised death rates from CHD, for adults aged 35-74, by sex, 1968-1997 Figure 1.4a Death rates from CHD, men aged 35-74, latest available year Figure 1.4b Death rates from CHD, women aged 35-74, latest available year Figure 1.4c Death rates from CHD, men aged 35-74, 1968-1997, selected countries Figure 1.4d Death rates from CHD, women aged 35-74, 1968-1997, selected countries Table 1.5 Age-standardised death rates from stroke, for adults aged 35-74, by sex, 1968-1997 Figure 1.5a Death rates from stroke, men aged 35-74, latest available year Figure 1.5b Death rates from stroke, women aged 35-74, latest available year Figure 1.5c Death rates from stroke, men aged 35-74, 1968-1997, selected countries Figure 1.5d Death rates from stroke, women aged 35-74, 1968-1997, selected countries Table 1.6 Years of life lost in early death by cause, 1990, EU and Europe 2. Morbidity Table 2.1 Coronary event rates, coronary case fatality, annual change in coronary event rates and annual change in coronary case fatality, adults aged 35-64, by sex, latest available year, MONICA Project populations Table 2.2 Years lived with disability and disability-adjusted life years lost, by cause, 1990, EU and Europe Figure 2.2 Disability-adjusted life years lost by cause, 1990, EU 6 7 8 10 14 16 16 17 17 18 20 20 21 21 22 24 24 25 25 26 28 28 29 29 30 32 32 33 33 34 35 37 38 39 </li><li> 4. European cardiovascular disease statistics 4 3. Treatment Table 3.1 Rates of hospital discharges for CVD, CHD and stroke, latest available year Figure 3.1 Rates of hospital discharges for CHD, crude and adjusted for standardised mortality rates from CHD in adults aged 35-74, latest available year Table 3.2 Age and sex-standardised rates of various procedures for treating CVD, around 1995 Figure 3.2 Rates of coronary artery bypass surgery, crude and adjusted for standardised mortality rates from CHD, in adults aged 35-74, around 1995 Table 3.3 Reported medication, hospital patients with established CHD, around 1995, EUROASPIRE Survey populations 4. Smoking Table 4.1 Total numbers of deaths and numbers of deaths due to smoking, adults aged 35 and over, by sex and cause, 1995 Table 4.2 Prevalence of smoking, adults aged 15 and over, by sex, latest available year Figure 4.2a Prevalence of smoking, men aged 15 and over, latest available year Figure 4.2b Prevalence of smoking, women aged 15 and over, latest available year Table 4.3 Prevalence of smoking, adults aged 35-64, by sex, latest available year, MONICA Project populations Table 4.4 Prevalence of smoking, 15 year olds, by sex, 1989/90 and 1993/94 Table 4.5 Prevalence of smoking, adults aged 15 and over, by sex, 1980-1997 Table 4.6 Prevalence of smoking, adults aged 15 and over, by sex, 1974-1994 Figure 4.6 Prevalence of smoking, adults aged 15 and over, by sex, 1974-1994 5. Diet Table 5.1 Fruit and vegetable consumption, adults, by sex, latest available year Table 5.2 Percentage of total energy from fruit and vegetables, 1972-1997 Figure 5.2a Percentage of total energy from fruit and vegetables, 1997 Figure 5.2b Percentage of total energy from fruit and vegetables, 1972-1997, selected countries Table 5.3 Percentage of total energy from fat, adults, by sex, latest available year Table 5.4 Percentage of total energy from fat, 1972-1997 Figure 5.4a Percentage of total energy from fat, 1997 Figure 5.4b Percentage of total energy from fat, 1972-1997, selected countries Table 5.5 Percentage of total energy from cereals, 1972-1997 Figure 5.5 Percentage of total energy from cereals, 1972-1997, selected countries 6. Physical activity Table 6.1 Participation in various physical activities in a typical week, adults aged 15 and over, 1997, EU countries Table 6.2 Number of hours spent participating in various physical activities in a typical week, adults aged 15 and over, 1997, EU countries Figure 6.2 Percentage of adults aged 15 and over who do no physical activity in a typical week, 1997 7. Alcohol Table 7.1 Alcohol consumption, 1970-1997 Figure 7.1 Alcohol consumption, 1997 40 41 41 42 42 43 44 46 47 48 48 49 49 50 51 52 53 55 56 57 57 58 59 60 60 61 62 63 64 65 65 66 67 68 </li><li> 5. European cardiovascular disease statistics 5 8. Blood pressure Table 8.1 Systolic blood pressure levels, adults aged 35-64, by sex, latest available year, MONICA Project populations Figure 8.1 Percentage of adults aged 35-64 with systolic blood pressure levels &gt;160 mmHg, latest available year 9. Blood cholesterol Table 9.1 Blood cholesterol levels, adults aged 35-64, by sex, latest available year, MONICA Project populations Figure 9.1 Percentage of adults aged 35-64 with blood cholesterol levels &gt; 7.8 mmol/l, latest available year 10. Overweight and obesity Table 10.1 Prevalence of overweight and obesity, adults aged 15 and over, 1997, EU countries Table 10.2 Prevalence of overweight and obesity, adults aged 35-64, by sex, latest available year, MONICA Project populations Table 10.3 Prevalence of obesity, adults, by sex, 1978-1997 Figure 10.3 Prevalence of obesity, adults, by sex 1978-1997 11. Diabetes Table 11.1 Prevalence of diabetes, 1980-1997 Appendix Acknowledgements 69 70 70 71 72 72 73 74 74 75 75 76 77 78 80 </li><li> 6. European cardiovascular disease statistics 6 Foreword Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the main cause of death in Europe. It is responsible for hundreds of thousands of early deaths and for much suffering. CVD is not only a major threat to individuals' lives and their quality of life, it is also a major economic burden to all European countries. This publication - European cardiovascular disease statistics - sponsored by the British Heart Foundation is the first we know of which brings together all the currently available sources of information about how much death and illness is caused by CVD across Europe, and also about levels of underlying risk factors for the disease. Accurate and comprehensive data on CVD and its risk factors are essential to the development of a coherent European strategy for the prevention and treatment of CVD. European cardiovascular disease statistics shows that there is a considerable amount of relevant data collected. This data indicate how and where efforts to prevent and treat CVD should be targeted. However the data vary considerably in quality and in particular there is an urgent need to improve their comparability. The problem of data comparability was raised in 1993, at the Third International Conference on Preventive Cardiology, and again in 1994 at a conference organised by the European Heart Network and sponsored by the Netherlands Heart Foundation and the European Commission - the Eurodata Conference1 . This conference examined various ways of increasing the comparability of health data. The European Heart Network considers that there is an urgent need for the European Union (EU) to create structures which facilitate the collection of accurate, comprehensive and comparable data in relation to CVD. In the meantime we hope this publication will be a valuable tool for policy makers, health professionals, researchers and all those working to improve the length and quality of life of Europeans. Susanne Lgstrup Director European Heart Network 1. European Heart Network (1994) European Heart Network's Eurodata Conference. Measuring the burden of cardiovascular disease in Europe: Steps towards establishing comparable data. Netherlands Heart Foundation: Den Haag. </li><li> 7. European cardiovascular disease statistics 7 Summary Cardiovascular disease (CVD) causes 4 million deaths each year in Europe and over 1.5 million deaths each year in the European Union (EU). CVD causes nearly half of all deaths in Europe (48%) and in the EU (41%). CVD is the main cause of death in women in all countries of Europe and is the main cause of death in men in all countries except France. CVD is the main cause of years of life lost in early death in Europe and the EU. Nearly 30% of years of life lost in Europe are due to CVD (over 30% in the EU). CVD mortality, incidence and case fatality are falling in most Northern, Southern and Western European Countries but rising in Central and Eastern European countries. Each year smoking kills about 1.2 million people in Europe (430,000 from CVD) and about 500,000 people in the EU (130,000 from CVD). Smoking has been declining in many European countries but the rate of decline is now slowing. Women are now smoking nearly as much as men in many European countries and girls often smoke more than boys. Diets are generally improving in Northern and Western European countries but deteriorating in Southern, Central and Eastern European countries. Dietary patterns across Europe - once very different - are now converging. Levels of obesity are increasing across Europe. The prevalence of diabetes is increasing across Europe. </li><li> 8. European cardiovascular disease statistics 8 Introduction The aim of the publication European cardiovascular disease statistics is designed for policy makers, health professionals, medical researchers and anyone else with an interest in cardiovascular disease (CVD). It provides the most recent European statistics related to the incidence, prevalence, causes and effects of the disease. The aim of European cardiovascular disease statistics is to show: (i) the extent to which CVD is the major health problem in Europe; (ii) where, in Europe, this problem is greatest; (iii) the variability in efforts to treat and prevent CVD across Europe as shown by differences in levels of treatment and in levels of risk factors for the disease; (iv) trends in CVD and its treatment, prevention and risk factors over time. European cardiovascular disease statistics is divided into 11 sections. The first two sections on mortality and morbidity deal with the burden of CVD in Europe. Next there is a section on treatment. Then there are four sections on the main aspects of lifestyle which affect the risk of the disease: smoking, diet, physical activity and alcohol consumption. Finally there are four sections on the main physiological risk factors for the disease: raised blood pressure, raised blood cholesterol, overweight/obesity and diabetes. Each section contains a set of tables and graphs and a brief description of the data presented. In European cardiovascular disease statistics we aim only to describe and not to explain. So although there may be relationships between the various geographical and temporal patterns observed we have made no attempt to draw any conclusions about the strength of these relationships or about causality. Sources and scope of the data In compiling European cardiovascular disease statistics we have only consulted international sources: that is the World Health Organization (WHO), the WHO MONICA (monitoring trends and determinants in cardiovascular disease) Project, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the European Union (EU), the European Society of Cardiology, etc. We have not sought data from national sources though we may do so in future editions. The data presented are extremely variable in quality. The original sources need to be consulted for information about data quality. The statistics in European cardiovascular disease statistics are only a selection of the data available. The original sources should be consulted for further data. We also investigated several sources of data from which we have not extracted statistics: either because the data provided were similar, but less comprehensive or less recent, than the data we have included, or were not directly relevant to the focus of the publication. </li><li> 9. European cardiovascular disease statistics 9 There are many different definitions of 'Europe'. We have chosen to use the member states of the World Health Organization's European Region as our definition of 'Europe'. (An Appendix lists the member states of the World Health Organization's European Region and of the EU and has a map.) The number of European countries covered in the tables and graphs varies considerably. We have, where possible, given an overall figure for Europe and also for the EU. One omission from the statistics deserves special mention. We do not have a section on the economic costs of CVD. We know that for some individual countries estimates have been made of the cost of CVD to the economy1 , but we could find no adequate analysis for Europe (or the EU) as a whole. This is a deficiency we propose to rectify in future editions. Previous publications There have been several previous attempts to characterise the burden of CVD in Europe and to examine geographical and temporal patterns in the disease and its prevention and treatment. Notable in this regard is a report of a Task Force of the European Society of Cardiology on Cardiovascular Mortality and Morbidity Statistics in Europe2 and a report, recently published by the European Society of Cardiology entitled Cardiovascular diseases in Europe from which we draw data on rates of procedures in Europe3 . European cardiovascular disease statistics, complements these publications. It is less detailed but more up-to-date than the European Society of Cardiology Task Force report, and, in contrast to both previous publications includes data on the prevalence of risk factors for CVD. European cardiovascular disease statistics is also designed to complement the work of the European Commission on monitoring healt...</li></ol>

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