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  • English Language Learners (ELLs)

    Developed by the Connecticut RESC Alliance

    Sponsored by the Connecticut Department of Education

    p y

  • Who is an ELL?Who is an ELL?

    A student who: has a first language other thanhas a first language other than

    English. is in the process of learning English. needs additional support to acquireneeds additional support to acquire

    language and learn grade level contentcontent.

  • Name that AcronymName that AcronymELL English Language Learner (Term used in

    )Connecticut)

    LEP Limited English Proficient (Term used by LEP Limited English Proficient (Term used by federal government)

    ESLESL English as a Second Language (Term used to describe programs)

    ESOL English for Speakers of Other Languages (Term is synonymous with ESL)

  • Read this to yourself to experience y phow an ELL student may feel

    Despite often difficult smerds, the lower delta people have their flaps of schats. They enjoy market days and various takloops. Many of

    these celebrations have their toops in ancient collian traditions. One of the most popular p ptakloops is the Alacitas Fair. It is blod to honor Ekeko, the Alacitas god of blap

    fortune. Small strets of this tristy are sold infortune. Small strets of this tristy are sold in the thropheet. Each figure is wust sath tiny goods. They include nill the things that a

    lower delta may want or need a snupy nicklower delta may want or need a snupy nick of absop or wigar, a car, two whurds, a

    television set, house or cow.

  • Quick Facts about Connecticuts English Language Learners (ELLs) 2009 10:English Language Learners (ELLs), 2009-10:

    There were 29,993 ELL students in 162 public LEAs While there were 133 dominant languages among ELL

    students, Spanish accounted for 73 percent of ELLs 96 7 percent received English language services 96.7 percent received English language services Over half were in grades K-4 4,195 were also identified for Special Education , p In the 2008-09 school year, 97.3 percent of ELL students

    took the annual English language proficiency assessment (LAS Li k ) 81 2 t d f th i(LAS Links); 81.2 percent made progress from the prior year and 43.6 percent demonstrated English proficiency

    The four year graduation rate for ELL students in theThe four year graduation rate for ELL students in the class of 2009 was 53.4 percent

    CSDE ELL Data Bulletin 2009-2010

  • Table 3: Top 10 Dominant Languages of CT ELL Students 2009-10of CT ELL Students, 2009-10

    Spanishp Portuguese Chinese Creole-Haitian Polish Albanian Arabic Vietnamese Vietnamese Urdu RussianRussian

    CSDE ELL Bulletin 2009-2010

  • Languages in ELL at Wethersfield High Schoolg g g

    SpanishSpanish Bosnian

    U d Urdu Albanian/Greek Polish RussianRussian

  • Debunking the Myths g yMyth #1

    ELLs learn English easily and quickly simply by being exposed to and surrounded by native g p yEnglish speakers.

    F t L i d l t k tiFact: Learning a second language takes time and significant intellectual effort on the part of the learner Learning a second language is hardlearner. Learning a second language is hard work; even the youngest learners do not simply "pick up" the language.p p g g

    Source: Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages, Inc.

  • Myth #2Myth #2

    When ELLs are able to con erse comfortabl in EnglishWhen ELLs are able to converse comfortably in English, they have developed proficiency in the language.

    Fact: It can take 6-9 years for ELLs to achieve the same levels of proficiency in academic English as native speakers. Moreover, ELLs participating in thoughtfullyspeakers. Moreover, ELLs participating in thoughtfully designed programs of bilingual or sheltered content instruction remain in school longer and attain significantly higher rates of academic achievement in comparison tohigher rates of academic achievement in comparison to students without such advantages.

    Source: Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages, Inc.

  • Myth #3Myth #3

    In earlier times immigrant children learned English rapidly and assimilated easily into American life.

    Fact: Many immigrant students during the early part of this century did not learn English quickly or well. Many y g q y ydropped out of school to work in jobs that did not require the kinds of academic achievement and communication skills that substantive employment opportunities require todaytoday.

    Source: Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages, Inc.

  • Benefits of ELLs in our districtBenefits of ELLs in our district

    A multicultural environment helps students to grow, respect, and value each other.g p

    Students learn to appreciate differences. Students are better able to enter and Students are better able to enter and

    compete in a global society.St d t h k th Students who can speak more than one language have a higher earning potential.

  • All ELLs in schools today are not alike

    How ELL students differ: Length of residencyg y Levels of literacy in first language and in

    EnglishEnglish Different primary languages and cultures

    L l d lit f i h li Levels and quality of previous schooling Literacy and socioeconomic status of the

    family

  • Conversational Language d i vs. Academic Language

    There are two types of English language skills that must be mastered by students:

    1) Conversational Language Skills 1-31) Conversational Language Skills 1 3 years to master

    2) Academic Language Skills at least 52) Academic Language Skills at least 5 years or more to master

    Source: Jim Cummins, University of Toronto

  • Identify ELLSIdentify ELLS

    All incoming ELLs must be assessed within one month of entrance at the t t f th h l ithi t k if t d t t l t i th

    Home Language Survey Response other than

    start of the school year or within two weeks if students enter later in the school year.

    pEnglish to registration language questions

    Interview of student and parentPrevious tests/recordsELL Proficiency testingELL Proficiency testing

    Identification on state PSIS report and receive

    servicing

  • Provide Quality Instruction

    Content language and classroom

    Provide Quality Instruction

    Content, language and classroom assessments should be adapted to students individual language levelsstudents individual language levels.

    Vocabulary needs to be explicitly taught with many opportunities for interactionwith many opportunities for interaction.

    Students first language and cultural i h ld b lid t dexperiences should be validated,

    respected, and shared.

    Source: Echevarria, Vogt, & Short. (2007). Making Content Comprehensible for English Learners: The SIOP Modell. Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon

  • Annual AssessmentAnnual Assessment

    LAS Links Proficiency Test - All ELLs must be assessed annually in English language proficiency The results are reported to theproficiency . The results are reported to the state.

    Reading, Writing, Math, and ScienceReading, Writing, Math, and Science Assessments (CMT,CAPT).

    Students meet exit criteria when they are proficient on LAS Links and meet the state standards on the CMT/CAPT.

    Once students have exited and are no longer Once students have exited and are no longer receiving services, they may not be re-identified.

  • Exit CriteriaExit Criteria

    LAS Links Score of 4 or 5 (proficient andLAS Links Score of 4 or 5 (proficient and above proficient)

    CMT level 3 (Proficient) in Reading and CMT level 3 (Proficient) in Reading and Mathl l 2 (B i ) i W itilevel 2 (Basic) in Writing

    CAPT level 2 (Basic) in Reading, Math and Writing

  • CAPTCAPT

    New to the US ELL students are required toNew to the US ELL students are required to take the Math and Science CAPT regardless of when they arriveregardless of when they arrive.

    New ELL students are exempt from the Reading and Writing only if they have beenReading and Writing only if they have been in a US school less than 12 calendar monthsmonths.

    After 12 months, they are required to take ll ti f th CAPT Th ll dall portions of the CAPT. They are allowed

    some accommodations.

  • Exiting Criteriag

  • English Proficiency ScoresEnglish Proficiency Scores

    LAS Links Scores range 1-5LAS Links Scores range 1 5 1 Beginner

    2 E l I t di t 2 Early Intermediate 3 Intermediate 4 Proficient 5 Above Proficient5 Above Proficient

    These are the levels described on the student modification sheetsstudent modification sheets.

  • Stages of Language AcquisitionStages of Language AcquisitionStage 1 Stage 2 Stage 3 Stage 4 Stage 5

    Pre-productionBeginner

    Early ProductionBeginner

    Speech EmergenceIntermediate

    Early FluencyAdvanced

    FluencyAdvanced

    Li l Li i d NLittle or noComprehension

    Survival English

    Limited comprehension

    One/two word

    Understandsconversational English, not academic English

    Fluent in conversation

    Difficulty with

    Near native language skills

    Silent period

    Learning basicti

    responses

    Simple vocab

    U d t d

    Writes simple and complex sentences

    academic English

    Reading and

    Difficulty with some content

    conversation

    Needs time to adjust

    Understands more than can express

    Difficulty with content area vocabulary

    Very challenged by

    writing skills below a native speaker

    area English

    Difficulty ith idigrade level reading with idioms