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  • ED 094 236

    TITLE

    INSTITUTION

    PUB DATENOTE

    EDRS PRICEDESCRIPTORS

    DOCUMENT RESUME

    CB 001 767

    Learning Center Ideas in Action. A How-to Handbookfor Starting an Individualized Adult Learning Center.Revised Edition 1973.Los Angeles City Schools, Calif. Div. of Career andContinuing Education.73119p.

    MF-$0.75 HC-$5.40 PLUS POSTAGE*Adult Education; *Adult Education Programs;Classroom Arrangement; *Continuing Education Centers;Course Content; Course Organization; *IndividualizedInstruction; Program Content; Program Costs; ProgrAmDevelopment; *Programed Instruction; ProgramEvaluation; Recordkeeping; Student Placement; TeacherRole; Testing

    ABSTRACTThis handbook provides guidelines for administrators

    and teachers for establi/shing classes that emphasize individualizedprogramed learning. The suggestions are primarily for use incommunity adult school classrooms of standard size. Some of the',flows!' of setting ap the program arc- (1) the utilization of theclassroom (space, size, and furniture); (2) organizing a goodrecordkeeping system (student folders, course materials, tests andanswer keys, and supplemental materials); (3) putting together thelearning materials (course outlines and course segments) ; (4)providing student enrollment and placement; (5) how to spend yourdollars; (6) the cha7nging role of the teacher (as a counselor, testadministrator,tutor, supervisor and bookkeeper, and curriculumspecialist; and (3) how to evaluate your program (through checklistsand flow charts). Appendixes provide further detailed help ondistrict approved courses in programed instruction, courses notlisted, adult schools with individualized learning centers, lists ofpublishers and vendors of instructional materials and equipment,samples of diagnostic placement tests, reading surveys, testpublishers, budget priorities for learning centers, professionalreferences, and a sample program to introduce programed instructionto new students. (BP)

  • U S OEPARTMENTOF HEALTHEDUCATION I WELFARENATIONAL INSTITUTE OF

    EDUCATIONTHIS DOCUMENT HAS PEEN REPRO01/CEO EXACTLY AS RECEIVED ; ROM.HE PERSON OR ORGANIZATION OR lorNATING IT POINTS OF VIEW OR OPINIONSSTATED DO NOT ,vECESSAP.LY RE PRESENT OFFICIAL NATIONAL oi I' 0;EOJCATiON POSITION OR PO,. IC v

    4;

    PERMISSION 10 RE PROOLX E THIS COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL ..44, [ADM GRANTED Br

    Abram FriedmanLosAngeles USD

    To CHIC AND ORGANIZATIONS OPERATINGUNDER AGREEMENT:, JYITH THE 'NATIONAL INST,TUTE OF EDurAriON EtIRIHER REPRODU, TinN OUIS.D[ THE FRIr Sys/EM PE

    PIRMyx,E4 0; THE roPvRIGurCANNER

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    result of this handbook isto encourage you to try some

    learning center ideas-in action

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    LEARNINGCENTERIDEAIN ACTIONThis handbook is designed for thoseworking in the Community AdultSchool. Its basic structure. however.can be used in secondary schools.

    COPYRIGHT 01972

    LOS ANGELES UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT

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    IT1DIVIDLIFILIZED LEPRI1M6 Ism ANOTHER DIMETI5IOT1

    THAT CAN BE USED TO ADVANTAGE IN THE COMMUNITY

    ADULT SCHOOL PROGRAMili

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    FOREWORD

    Requests from teachers and administrators have indicated a need for a procedural handbook on howto organize a multimedia individualized learning center. Characteristics of individualized instructionare its flexibility and adaptability. It permits open enrollment, progress of each student at his ownlearning rate and comprehension level, absence of time pressures, and a wide choice of materials.The Study Skills Centers that currently function in many community adult schools are built aroundindividualized learning programs and materials.

    This handbook provides some guidelines for administrators and teachers in establishing classes thatemphasize individualized programed learning. Minimum requirements for getting started are listed aswell as suggestions for expansion as the curriculum develops and the budget permits.

    Individualized instruction is not a panacea for the slow learner nor a catch-all to solve every academicrequirement. Rather, it is another dimension of instruction that can be used to advantage.

    Although the suggestions in this handbook are primarily for use in community adult school classroomsof standc.rd size, they can be adapted to meet the needs of the Work Incentive Program, Adult BasicEducation, Regional Occupational Centers, and other programs and levels of the school system.

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    ABRAM FRIEDMANAssistant SuperintendentDivision of Career and

    Continuing Education

    -...thbrantee

    if

  • is urgentfor the adult student

    The adult student's time is valuable. His studies must meet his needs now. Widely varying

    educctional backgrounds of adult learners necessitate a wide range of study materials to

    permit individua;ized learning.

    THE MEANS JUSTIFIES THE._

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  • BEGINNING!

    If you have an available roam, locked storage

    facilities, a filing cabinet, a minimum of

    instructional material, and a willingness to

    get involved in new, exciting learning media,

    then YOU are READY to BEGIN!

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  • LEARNINGCENTER

    L

    11IN ACTION

    CONT ENTS

    Solve Room Ridd!es Page 2

    Here's Where It's At Page 11

    Get It Together Page 14

    Present & Accounted For Page 19

    How To Spend Your FirstDollars ?age 21

    Here's Looking At You Page 22

    Instant Replay Page 24

    APPENDICESA District-Authorized P.I. CoursesB P.I. Courses Not Listed in Catalog of Authorized SubjectsC Individualized Adult Learning CentersD Lists of Publishers and Vendors of Instructional

    Materials and EquipmentE Samples of Diagnostic Placement TestsF Reading Surveys and Test PublishersG Budget Priorities for Learning CentersH Professional Reference.;I Introduction to Programni

    1

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    Mg11111BY DAY: A CLASSROOM BY NIGHT???

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    in room layouts 1 and 2, it is assumed

    that the evening teacher is sharing aroom with a day richer and thataccess has been .-rided to a closet

    and or storage cabinet. Each eveningteacher must place learning kits,

    audio-visual equipment, and materials

    on available counter space for the

    convenience of students. These

    materials must then be scored after

    each class session, and furniture

    must be moved back to its day positions.

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    ROOM 0111.1.111.01. I

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    to accommodate a maximum of 25 students with standard school furniture.

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    STUDY11111011_CARREL

    STUDYCARREL

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    TABLE TABLE

    TABLE TABLE

    TABLE TABLE11.10ar

    TABLE TABLE

    DESKBOOKCASES

    This layout shows a classroom of standard size, equipped with tables, 10 study carrels, shelves abovecarrels for storage of materials, a teacher's desk, filing cabinets, bookcases.

    6

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    Study Labs and Learning Centers accent theflexibility vital to individualized programedinstruction.

    The class of standard size is equipped with tables, 10 to 20 study carrels,';'orage shelves, a teacher's desk, filing cabinets, and bookcases.

    7

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    S kIDEASIN ACTION .

    The scale of the graph opposite is 3,8 inch to one foot, andthe cut-outs for typical pieces of furniture shown below arescaied the some way. Paste this page to a sheet of lightcardboard before cutting out the pieces, and move yourfurniture around the easy way!

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    Courtesy of EDL McGraw-Hill Coast VY suol Education Co.

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    Ready, Camera, Action!

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  • HERE'SWHERE

    IT'S

    Get a four drawer filing cabinet with a key and...USE IT:

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    Files and records are of vital importance to a learning lab.

    Organization comes from your filing cahmet, end the records

    kept there supply current information regarding the progress

    of 'Le fah on a rt5 stwit ItS. A i._;;Doc, filIng system

    at ,4 a c ik.:Lot 1,, 1. t_t p a of tar ion arr orntolde

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    TAKE 1HE TIME TO ORGANIZE YOURPROGRAM BEFORE YOU OPEN YOURDOORS

    Student Folders

    Course Materials

    Tests & Answer Keys

    Supplemental Materials11

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    .> A"Senvik time skeet kuh urntilittedresponses. Could be used :,in a clip-board or posted (ni a bulletin board I. -

    ADULT LEARNING CENTERSTUDENT RECORD CARD