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Differentiated Instruction and Assessment By: Preview Kim Breon and Jenelle Hershey

Differentiated Instruction and Assessment

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Differentiated Instruction and Assessment. By: Preview Kim Breon and Jenelle Hershey. Introduction to Differentiated Instruction. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Page 1: Differentiated Instruction and Assessment

Differentiated Instruction and

Assessment By:

Preview Kim Breonand

Jenelle Hershey

Page 2: Differentiated Instruction and Assessment

On a simple level, differentiated instruction is teaching with student variance in mind. It means starting where the kids are rather than adopting a standardized approach to teaching that seems to presume that all learners of a given age or grade are essentially alike. Thus differentiated instruction is “responsive” teaching rather than “one-size-fits-all” teaching.

A better definition of differentiated instruction

is that a teacher proactively plans varied approaches to what students need to learn, how they will learn it, and/or how they can express what they have learned in order to increase the likelihood that each student will learn as much as he or she can as efficiently as possible. (Tomlinson, 2003, p. 151)

Introduction to Differentiated Instruction

Page 3: Differentiated Instruction and Assessment

In a differentiated classroom, unique student abilities are celebrated and praised versus a classroom with zero differentiation where similarities of student abilities are focused upon.

Differentiation means giving students options in their learning environment and it is up the students to take the next step.

What is Differentiated Instruction?

Page 4: Differentiated Instruction and Assessment

Differentiating the content or topic means… What the student needs to learn. The

instructional concepts should be broad based, and all students should be given access to the same core content. However, the content’s complexity should be adapted to students’ learner profiles. Teachers can vary the presentation of content,( i.e., textbooks, lecture, demonstrations, taped texts) to best meet students’ needs.

Source: CEC | Differentiated Instruction. (n.d.). CEC | Home. Retrieved April 22, 2011, from http://www.cec.sped.org/AM/Template.cfm?

Section=Differentiated_Instruction&Template=/TaggedPage/TaggedPageDisplay.cfm&TPLID=24&ContentID=4695

What does DI look like?

Page 5: Differentiated Instruction and Assessment

Differentiating the process and activities means…

Activities in which the student engages to make sense of or master the content. Examples of differentiating process activities include scaffolding, flexible grouping, interest centers, manipulatives, varying the length of time for a student to master content, and encouraging an advanced learner to pursue a topic in greater depth.

Source: CEC | Differentiated Instruction. (n.d.). CEC | Home. Retrieved April 22, 2011, from

http://www.cec.sped.org/AM/Template.cfm?Section=Differentiated_Instruction&Template=/TaggedPage/TaggedPageDisplay.cfm&TPLID=24&ContentID=4695

What does DI look like?

Page 6: Differentiated Instruction and Assessment

Differentiating the product means…

The culminating projects that ask students to apply and extend what they have learned. Products should provide students with different ways to demonstrate their knowledge as well as various levels of difficulty, group or individual work, and various means of scoring.

Source: CEC | Differentiated Instruction. (n.d.). CEC | Home. Retrieved April 22, 2011, from

http://www.cec.sped.org/AM/Template.cfm?Section=Differentiated_Instruction&Template=/TaggedPage/TaggedPageDisplay.cfm&TPLID=24&ContentID=4695

What does DI look like?

Page 7: Differentiated Instruction and Assessment

Differentiating by manipulating the environment or through accommodating individual learning styles means…

The way the classroom works and feels. The differentiated classroom should include areas in which students can work quietly as well as collaborate with others, materials that reflect diverse cultures, and routines that allow students to get help when the teacher isn’t available.

DI Teacher at Work Video ClipText Source: "CEC | Differentiated Instruction." CEC | Home. N.p., n.d. Web. 22 Apr. 2011. <http://www.cec.sped.org/AM/Template.cfm?

Section=Differentiated_Instruction&Template=/TaggedPage/TaggedPageDisplay.cfm&TPLID=24&ContentID=4695>.

Video Source:Murphey, J. (n.d.). YouTube - Teaching Methods: Differentiated Instruction . YouTube - Broadcast Yourself. . Retrieved April 22, 2011, from

http://youtu.be/40aEHZBUuBQ

What does DI look like?

Page 8: Differentiated Instruction and Assessment

Teachers DO Teachers DON’T• provide several learning options, or different paths to learning, which help students take in information and make sense of concepts and skills.

• develop a separate lesson plan for each student in a classroom.

• provide appropriate levels of challenge for all students, including those who lag behind, those who are advanced, and those right in the middle.

• "water down" the curriculum for some students.

What Differentiated Instruction Means for Teachers

Source: Willoughby, J. (n.d.). Differentiating Instruction: Meeting Students Where They Are, Teaching Today, Glencoe Online. Glencoe/McGraw-Hill. Retrieved April 22, 2011, from http://www.glencoe.com/sec/teachingtoday/subject/di_meeting.phtml

Page 9: Differentiated Instruction and Assessment

Teachers need to assess students. Create DI such as the use of timers for students who

have difficulties with time progression as you, the teacher, can cue them when to set their timer throughout the day.

For students who have trouble asking questions due to embarrassment or fear, teach them how to ask questions and have them do it often.

Finally, for students with reading difficulties, have them record lectures or have books on tape available. These simple adjustments of differentiated instructions can make a significant difference in the lives of your students.

Source:

Willoughby, J. (n.d.). Differentiating Instruction: Meeting Students Where They Are, Teaching Today, Glencoe Online.

Glencoe/McGraw-Hill. Retrieved April 22, 2011, from http://www.glencoe.com/sec/teachingtoday/subject/di_meeting.phtml

Why is DI beneficial for Learning Disabled Students?

Page 10: Differentiated Instruction and Assessment

Math Lesson Example Source: Hall, T., Strangman, N., & Meyer, A. (2009, November 2). Differentiated Lesson Example. National Center on Accessible

Instructional Materials. Retrieved April 22, 2011, from http://pdonline.ascd.org/pd_html/di2lessonexamp.html

Tiered Curriculum Project K-12 Source: Tiered Curriculum Project. (n.d.). Indiana Department of Education. Retrieved April 20, 2011, from

http://www.doe.in.gov/exceptional/gt/tiered_curriculum/welcome.html

Differentiated Instruction Lesson Plan Examples from Leon County

Source: Lessons Page. (n.d.). Leon County Schools Division of School Management and Curriculum Services. Retrieved April 20, 2011, from http://www.tandl.leon.k12.fl.us/lang/Ellessonspage.html

Example Lesson Plans for Differentiated Instruction

Page 11: Differentiated Instruction and Assessment

Differentiated assessment is an ongoing process in which educators collect data before, during, and after instruction through multiple sources to identify each students’ needs and strengths.

Students’ knowledge and skills are differentiated due to their environment and prior knowledge.◦ The ways and speeds in which the student

processes new information and connect it to their prior knowledge and understanding differs from student to student; as does the way they most effectively demonstrate their progress.

◦ Video

What is Differentiated Assessment?

Page 12: Differentiated Instruction and Assessment

Assessment climate Knowing your

students Assessing before

instruction Assessing during

instruction Assessing after

instruction

Parts of Differentiated Assessment

Page 13: Differentiated Instruction and Assessment

Teachers need to show assessment is a positive occasion rather than a stressful time.◦ Assessment is a celebration of knowledge◦ Assessment is a chance to show what they know◦ Assessment is not meant to stump students

It’s also important to have a successful environment.◦ The Teacher Assessment of the Classroom

Environment on page 16 of Differentiated Assessment Strategies: One Tool Doesn’t Fit All is a helpful checklist for the teacher and students to complete.

Source:

Chapman, C., & King, R. (2005). Differentiated assessment strategies: one tool doesn't fit all. Thousand Oaks, Calif.: Corwin Press.

Assessment Climate

Page 14: Differentiated Instruction and Assessment

Know your students learning styles◦ This assessment would be beneficial for students with

special needs who are non verbal. Learning Styles through Toys

Strengths & Weaknesses◦ This assessment is worded will for young students. High

functioning students could take the test themselves or for low functioning students the teacher or parents could do for them. Multiple Intelligences

Interests◦ This interview sheet would be beneficial for students with

special needs who are readers and writers. Student Interview

Prior Knowledge Backgrounds

Knowing Your Students

Page 15: Differentiated Instruction and Assessment

Assessment Before Instruction

“Administer a pretest 2 or 3 weeks before the information is to be taught.  The test needs vary in types of questions (Bloom's taxonomy) for an accurate assessment.”

Assessing ahead “gives the teacher time to plan for the novice to the expert and those along the way.” The teacher can then also teach the gaps before the main topic.

“By administering the test early, the seeds of excitement have been planted about all the interesting things the students will be learning.”

Source:administering. (n.d.). Pre- Assessment. Assessment Strategies for

Differentiated Instruction. Retrieved April 22, 2011, from http://boe.ming.k12.wv.http://boe.ming.k12.wv.us/teachers/di/di_rubrics/pre-assessment.htm

Pre-Assessment. (n.d.). STEMResources.com - Tennessee. Retrieved April 22, 2011, from http:/?www.stemresources.com/index.pnp/option

=com_ content&view=article

Page 16: Differentiated Instruction and Assessment

Assessment Before Instruction

Page 17: Differentiated Instruction and Assessment

Ways to Assess Before Instruction

Click on the underlined examples to view more information of how they work.◦ Square off◦ Boxing◦ Yes/ No Cards◦ Graffiti Facts◦ KWL Charts◦ Response Cards

Source: administering. (n.d.). Pre- Assessment. Assessment Strategies for

Differentiated Instruction. Retrieved April 22, 2011, from http://boe.ming.k12.wv.http://boe.ming.k12.wv.us/teachers/di/di_rubrics/pre-assessment.htm

Chapman, C., & King, R. (2005). Differentiated assessment strategies: one tool doesn't fit all. Thousand Oaks, Calif.: Corwin Press.

Page 18: Differentiated Instruction and Assessment

Assessing During Instruction

Assessing during instructing students is important for the teacher to know students are understanding the information being taught.

The teacher can then assess the speed of instruction and/ or trouble areas in the topic.

Page 19: Differentiated Instruction and Assessment

Ways of Assessing During Instruction

Click on the underlined examples to view more information of how they work.◦ Thumb It◦ Fist of Five◦ Face the Fact◦ Reaching for the Top◦ Rating Responses◦ Classroom Assessment Techni

ques

Sources:Assessment during learning. (n.d.). Assessment Strategies for

Differentiated Instruction. Retrieved April 22, 2011, from http://boe.ming.k12.wv.us/teachers/di/di_rubrics/asssessment%20during%20learning.htm

Classroom Assessment Techniques. (n.d.). The National Teaching & Learning Forum. Retrieved April 22, 2011, from http://www.ntlf.com/html/lib/bib/assess.htm

Chapman, C., & King, R. (2005). Differentiated assessment strategies: one tool doesn't fit all. Thousand Oaks, Calif.:

Corwin Press.

Page 20: Differentiated Instruction and Assessment

Determine the skills the student’s should be mastering from the instruction. Use these to focus the assessment.

The post assessment should show the students’ knowledge of the topic.

Teachers can also use the students’ post assessment as a evaluation of their teaching.◦ If majority of the students missed the same

concept the teacher should re-teach that information to the whole class rather than in a small group situation.

Assessing After Instruction

Page 21: Differentiated Instruction and Assessment

Ways to Assess After Instruction

Click on the underlined examples to view more information of how they work.◦ Wraparounds◦ Conversation Circles◦ Donut◦ Rotation Reflection◦ Rubrics◦ Open ended questions◦ ELOs:

Evening Learning Opportunities Taking content home to

find items out of school

Source:Assessment After the Learning. (n.d.). Assessment Strategies for

Differentiated Instruction. Retrieved April 22, 2011, from http://boe.ming.k12.wv.us/teachers/di/di_rubrics/Assessment%20after%20the%20learning.htm

Differentiated Assessments. (n.d.). Educate Interactive: Connecting the Educational Community. Retrieved April 22, 2011, from http://www.educateinteractive.org

Chapman, C., & King, R. (2005). Differentiated assessment strategies: one tool doesn't fit all. Thousand Oaks, Calif.: Corwin Press.

◦ Maps◦ Journals◦ Timelines◦ Portfolios◦ Student- Created Rubrics◦ Multimedia Presentations

(Power Points, Videos, etc.)◦ Brochures/ Pamphlets◦ Songs/ Musical Scores◦ Self and Peer evaluations◦ Here are many other option

s

Page 22: Differentiated Instruction and Assessment

Examples of ELOs

Source: Chapman, C., & King, R. (2005). Differentiated assessment strategies: one tool doesn't fit all. Thousand Oaks, Calif.: Corwin Press.

Page 23: Differentiated Instruction and Assessment

Remember students should have choices in how they are assessed and how they show their knowledge of the topic.

Try to choose assessment options which are geared towards each learning style.

Video of Learning the Choices Video of Choice Responding

Examples of Choices

Page 24: Differentiated Instruction and Assessment

1. Differentiation does not take place over night.2. The methods you use should be based on the student's needs.3. Learn everything possible about your students for data purposes.4. Before starting a new unit of study, pre-assess students’ knowledge

to find out what the students know and do not know about the content in your lesson (misconceptions, instructional modifications).

5. Begin small, Creating a classroom where individual needs are met can start with one activity such as allowing students choice.

6. Gradually add more difficult things such as one differentiated lesson per nine weeks or semester, literature circles, or alternative assessments.

7. Set expectations for yourself and your students. 8. Stay up to date on best practices.

Source:

Williams, K. (n.d.). 8 Lessons Learned on Differentiating Instruction | Scholastic.com. Teaching Resources, Children's Book Recommendations, and Student Activities | Scholastic.com. Retrieved April 22, 2011, from http://www2.scholastic.com/browse/article.jsp?id=3747932

Eight Key Points in Closing

Page 25: Differentiated Instruction and Assessment

Administering. (n.d.). Pre- Assessment. Assessment Strategies for Differentiated Instruction. Retrieved April 22, 2011, from http://boe.ming.k12.wv.http://boe.ming.k12.wv.us/teachers/di/di_rubrics/pre-assessment.htm

 

Assessment After the Learning. (n.d.). Assessment Strategies for Differentiated Instruction. Retrieved April 22, 2011, from http://boe.ming.k12.wv.us/teachers/di/di_rubrics/Assessment%20after%20the%20learning.htm

 

Assessment during learning. (n.d.). Assessment Strategies for Differentiated Instruction. Retrieved April 22, 2011, from http://boe.ming.k12.wv.us/teachers/di/di_rubrics/asssessment%20during%20learning.htm

 

CAST: Center for Applied Special Technology. (n.d.). CAST: Center for Applied Special Technology. Retrieved April 22, 2011, from http://www.cast.org/

 

CEC | Differentiated Instruction. (n.d.). CEC | Home. Retrieved April 22, 2011, from http://www.cec.sped.org/AM/Template.cfm?Section=Differentiated_Instruction&Template=/TaggedPage/TaggedPageDisplay.cfm&TPLID=24&ContentID=4695

 

Classroom Assessment Techniques. (n.d.). The National Teaching & Learning Forum. Retrieved April 22, 2011, from http://www.ntlf.com/html/lib/bib/assess.htm

 

Chapman, C., & King, R. (2005). Differentiated assessment strategies: one tool doesn't fit all. Thousand Oaks, Calif.: Corwin Press.

 

Differentiated Assessments. (n.d.). Educate Interactive: Connecting the Educational Community. Retrieved April 22, 2011, from http://www.educateinteractive.org/best_practices/differentiated_assessments.html

 

Discovery Toys: Perfect Toy Finder|Learning Styles & Pathways|Special Needs|Autism. (n.d.). Discovery Toys: Educational Products|Special Needs Autism|Lifetime Guarantee Toys. Retrieved April 22, 2011, from http://toysdiscovery.com/finder.html

 

Hall, T., Strangman, N., & Meyer, A. (2009, November 2). Differentiated Lesson Example. National Center on Accessible Instructional Materials. Retrieved April 22, 2011, from http://pdonline.ascd.org/pd_html/di2lessonexamp.html

 

Index of Learning Styles Questionnaire . (n.d.). College of Engineering, NC State University. Retrieved April 22, 2011, from http://www.engr.ncsu.edu/learningstyles/ilsweb.html

References

Page 26: Differentiated Instruction and Assessment

Lessons Page. (n.d.). Leon County Schools Division of School Management and Curriculum Services. Retrieved April 20, 2011, from http://www.tandl.leon.k12.fl.us/lang/Ellessonspage.html

 

Mook, B. (n.d.). YouTube- Keeping It Relevant and "Authentic" . YouTube - Broadcast Yourself. . Retrieved April 22, 2011, from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XLXV4-peB-8&feature=youtu.be

 

Murphey, J. (n.d.). YouTube - Teaching Methods: Differentiated Instruction . YouTube - Broadcast Yourself. . Retrieved April 22, 2011, from http://youtu.be/40aEHZBUuBQ

 

Ned Productions - Multiple Intelligence Test. (n.d.). Ned Productions. Retrieved April 22, 2011, from http://www.nedprod.com/Niall_stuff/intelligence_test.html

 

Pre-Assessment. (n.d.). STEMResources.com - Tennessee. Retrieved April 22, 2011, from http://www.stemresources.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=51&Itemid=69

 

Special Education - Teaching Students with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: A Resource Guide for Teachers - BC Ministry of Education. (n.d.). BCIS Redirector . Retrieved April 22, 2011, from http://www.bced.gov.bc.ca/specialed/adhd/app4.htm

 

Steinhouse Publishers. (n.d.). Differentiated Cross-Grade Assessment - Eduss Learning. YouTube - Broadcast Yourself. . Retrieved April 22, 2011, from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=15BzySMbWP8&feature=related

 

Tiered Curriculum Project. (n.d.). Indiana Department of Education. Retrieved April 20, 2011, from http://www.doe.in.gov/exceptional/gt/tiered_curriculum/welcome.html

 

Tomlinson, C. A. (2001). How to differentiate instruction in mixed-ability classrooms (2nd ed.). Alexandria, Va.: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

 

Williams, K. (n.d.). 8 Lessons Learned on Differentiating Instruction | Scholastic.com. Teaching Resources, Children's Book Recommendations, and Student Activities | Scholastic.com. Retrieved April 22, 2011, from http://www2.scholastic.com/browse/article.jsp?id=3747932

 

Willoughby, J. (n.d.). Differentiating Instruction: Meeting Students Where They Are, Teaching Today, Glencoe Online. Glencoe/McGraw-Hill. Retrieved April 22, 2011, from http://www.glencoe.com/sec/teachingtoday/subject/di_meeting.phtml

YouTube - Differentiated Instruction (Presentation Ice Breaker) . (n.d.). YouTube - Broadcast Yourself. . Retrieved April 20, 2011, from http://youtu.be/NkYJItgcLn0

References Continued