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Dewey: Father of Modern Libraries A Dewey Decimal PowerPoint Presentation by Has Slone For MEDT 6463 (Dr. Snipes) 23 November, 2011

Dewey: Father of Modern Libraries A Dewey Decimal PowerPoint Presentation by Has Slone For MEDT 6463 (Dr. Snipes) 23 November, 2011

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The Dewey Decimal System

Dewey: Father of Modern LibrariesA Dewey Decimal PowerPoint Presentation by Has Slone For MEDT 6463 (Dr. Snipes)23 November, 2011

Note: Pictures are clipart unless otherwise credited.Source: http://www.fotosearch.com/clip-art/library.html1Presentation OverviewThis PowerPoint is designed to provide an overview of the Dewey Decimal Classification System to students in the 6th, 7th and 8th grades.Also included with the presentation are pre-and post-tests, plus links for further exploring.

http://www.freefoto.com/index.jsp2Pre-Test: How much do you already know?

1) Who created the Dewey Decimal System?A) Robert E. LeeB) Melville DeweyC) Huey, Louie and DeweyD) John Henry

2) Where would you look for some World War II information?A) 133.5B) 636C) 940.6D) 001.93) Where would you find something about William Shakespeare?A) 940.5B) 421.5B) 822.3D) 616.9

4) The Dewey Decimal System is composed of how many main sections?A) 100C) 50B) 25D) 10

5) Where do we find the DDC call numbers on a book?A) on the front coverB) with the prefaceC) on the spine of a bookD) on the back cover

6 ) What does the Dewey Decimal Classification number look like?A) ABC.DEFB) 123.456C) all of the aboveD) none of the above

3

The Dewey Decimal Classification System

What Is It?1) A system that classifies or categorizes nonfiction books into ten main divisions.2) A book is assigned a Dewey number based on its subject matter. 3) The Dewey number and the first three letters of the author's last name become the book's call number. 4) Nonfiction books are arranged numerically on the shelves according to DDC, ranging from 001 to 999.

A brief overview of the Dewey Decimal System4 Who was Melville Dewey?

The American librarian and reformer (1851-1931) established the Dewey Decimal System of classifying books. 2) Dewey changed librarianship from a vocation to a modern profession. 3) Melville Louis Kossuth Dewey, the youngest of five children, was born on December 10, 1851 in a small town in Northern New York State. 4) He attended Amherst College, where he worked in the library to help pay for his education. Dismayed at the way books were arranged. Melvil worked towards improving library classification systems. Combining his talent for math and his orderliness, he invented the Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC) System when he was twenty-one.

Photo source: http://www.encyclopedia.com/topic/Melvil_Dewey.aspx

A brief biography of Melvil Dewey: How one library pioneer profoundly influenced modern librarianshipMelville Louis Kossuth Dewey was born on December 10, 1851 to a poor family who lived in a small town in upper New York State. Keenly interested in simplified spelling, he shortened his first name to Melvil as a young adult, dropped his middle names and, for a short time, even spelled his last name as Dui. Dewey invented the Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC) system when he was 21 and working as a student assistant in the library of Amherst College. His work created a revolution in library science and set in motion a new era of librarianship. Melvil Dewey well deserves the title of Father of Modern Librarianship. Dewey changed librarianship from a vocation to a modern profession. He helped establish the American Library Association (ALA) in 1876; he was its secretary from 1876-1890 and its president for the 1890/1891 and 1892/1893 terms. He also co-founded and edited Library Journal. In addition, Dewey promoted library standards and formed a company to sell library supplies, which eventually became the Library Bureau company of today. A pioneer in library education, Dewey became the librarian of Columbia College (now Columbia University) in New York City in 1883, and founded the worlds first library school there in 1887. In 1889, he became director of the New York State Library in Albany, a position he held until 1906. Deweys range of knowledge and work was wide and varied. He pioneered the creation of career opportunities for women. He and his first wife, Annie Dewey, developed the Lake Placid Club, a resort for social, cultural and spiritual enrichment in the Adirondack Mountains. As an aforementioned spelling reformer, Dewey presented some of the early editions of the DDC in simplified spelling; his original introduction in simplified spelling was reprinted in subsequent editions of the DDC through publication of Edition 18 in 1971. Melvil Dewey died after suffering a stroke on December 26, 1931 at age 80. Seven decades after his death, he is still primarily known for the Dewey Decimal Classification, the most widely used library classification scheme in the world.Source: http://www.oclc.org/dewey/resources/biography/5The Dewey Decimal System is divided into 10 main classes:And each of those classes is also divided into 10 divisions (for a total of 100 divisions) And each division is divided into 10 sections (for a total of 1000 sections). Flaws: bias towards Protestant/American aspects prevalent in both the history and religion disciplines.constantly undergoing revisions. some classes like Technology, in the 600s which the call numbers are very crowded, and others that are very sparse.not easily expandable .Dewey had a profound effect on the library movement in America. He originated the DDC in 1873 and had it published and patented in 1876. There has been some speculation that Dewey synthesized ideas from a number of sources and coordinated them into a unified system. There is some evidence to suggest that Dewey may have been introduced to the idea of a decimal classification by a pamphlet written by Nathaniel Shurtlaff in 1856. 3 The DDC may also have been partly adapted from a scheme that William Lorrey Harris had formed from a structure expressed by Sir Francis Bacon, and refined by the German philosopher G. W. F. Hegel. 4 Regardless of where the scheme emerged from, however, Dewey was the first person to properly expand on and define his ideas concerning a classification that placed books into a relative order based on disciplines rather than an alphabetical order, or one that simply identifies a shelf space for a specific book.

Flaws1. There is a bias towards Protestant/American aspects prevalent in both the history and religion disciplines. These problems are being addressed in each new revision and edition.2. There is the potential for very large classification call numbers as a result of number building, and the need for extreme accuracy by some libraries.3. The DDC does not work as well as other classification systems for large academic institutions; although attempts have been made at some.4. The DDC is not as easily expandable as classification systems like the Library of Congress Classification system when new subjects or technologies emerge.5. Sections of library catalogues can require significant revisions when new editions come out, and catalogue divisions in many libraries may need to undertake a great deal of additional work to move from one edition of the DDC to the next.6. The DDC is constantly undergoing revisions. (Note, this can also be considered a merit.)7. Within the DDC there are some disciplines that are closely related, yet quite separate numerically like literature 800-899 and languages 400-499.8. Within the DDC there are also some classes like Technology, in the 600s which the call numbers are very crowded, and others that are very sparse.http://www.slais.ubc.ca/courses/libr517/02-03-wt2/projects/dewey/P1Section3.htm

6 Classifications 000s Generalities100s Philosophy and Psychology200s Religion300s Social Sciences400s Language500s Natural Sciences and Mathematics600s Technology, Applied Science 700s The Arts800s Literature900s History, geography and Biographies

7All of the books in your library fit into these 10 classifications. These are the ten divisions of the Dewey Decimal System. Each number beginning with 000 was given a subject. Therefore, books on the same subject are shelved together. This makes them easier to find. There is a book for every kind of reader in the library and they can find them using the Dewey Decimal system. The DDC works by organizing knowledge by discipline rather than by subject. There are ten different disciplines or main classes that contain subjects within them. The disciplines, or main classes, are: 000-099 Generalities100-199 Philosophy, paranormal phenomena, psychology200-299 Religion300-399 Social sciences400-499 Language500-599 Natural sciences and mathematics600-699 Technology (Applied sciences)700-799 The Arts: Fine and decorative arts800-899 Literature (Belles letters) and rhetoric900-999 Geography, history, and auxiliary disciplines 1 Within Each main class there are ten divisions: For example, the discipline of Social sciences 300-399: 300-309 Social sciences310-319 Collections of general statistics320-329 Political science330-339 Economics340-349 Law350-359 Public administration & military science360-369 Social problems & services: association370-379 Education380-389 Commerce, communications, transportations390-399 Customs, etiquette, folklore 2 And, within each division there are ten sections: For example, the division of 330-339: 330 Economics331 Labor economics332 Financial economics333 Economics of land & energy334 Cooperatives335 Socialism & related systems336 Public finance337 International economics338 Production339 Macroeconomics & related topics 3

He chose the classifications by asking himself questions.How did Dewey decide which subjects to include?

http://www.clipartguide.com/_search_terms/questions.html8How did Dewey decide which topics or subjects to include? He thought about what people are interested in and how they shared the information. He asked himself questions. You can ask yourself these same questions when looking for a specific book. http://www.clipartguide.com/_search_terms/questions.html

The First thing he asked himself was:How should we organize information?000-099General works

http://www.fotosearch.com/illustration/librarian.html9The first thing he asked himself was How do we organize information? 000-099 General WorksComputer Science, Information and General Works. This is where you will find Dictionaries, Encyclopedias and Bibliographies.

ELA6/7/8LSV2 The student listens to and views various forms of text and media in order to gather and share information..

025.04 ROTPhoto source: Has Slone from Langford library..November 2011digital photo000s -General Works Dictionaries/Encyclopedias/Computer science and Newspapers/Magazines- Computer science and programming books are here also, as well as books about newspapers and journalism, publishing, magazines and rare books. Reference books organize information and are placed in the 000s Generalities. The 000s are also used for expansion to add new topics in the future. Dewey knew he wouldnt be able to think of every topic or subject so he made sure that there was room for them. Other topics found in the 000s include computer guides and instruction and unexplained curiosities such as UFOs, ghosts, and Big Foot.The book presented is, Dangers on the Internet: Staying safe online, by Kevin F. Rothman. Grade 7 Up-Students will find plenty of sound advice and helpful guidelines in this easy-to-read book on wise use of the Internet. Organized into six chapters, this informative yet uncomplicated text includes important guidelines pertaining to general Web safety; the ins and outs of sending and receiving e-mail; commonsense advice on surfing; how to use chat rooms, newsgroups, and mailing lists; proper netiquette; and publishing on the Web. Without sounding preachy, Rothman succeeds at informing inexperienced users, reminds the experienced what to be cautious of while using the Internet, and tells readers to be constantly aware while on-line. A page of common acronyms used in chat rooms and a page of emoticons will be helpful to new users. An enlightening and practical book.10Who am I? 100-199Philosophy, Psychology

http://www.clipartguide.com/_search_terms/questions.html11Next, Dewey asked himself, Who am I? http://www.clipartguide.com/_search_terms/questions.html

100-199 Philosophy, Psychology Who am I?

The Mind and thinking classification!

Below is a website for a review of this book .

http://books.google.com/books/about/Chicken_soup_for_the_teenage_soul.html?id=6eQVoEBbp4oC

158.1 CHIPhoto source: Has Slone from Langford library..November 2011digital photo100s Philosophy and Psychology: talks about the mind- Philosophy, Psychology, Ethics behavioral sciences-This classification includes books on philosophy and psychology and includes books about logic, ethics, and Ancient Philosophers like Aristotle and Socrates. He was thinking about himself. You can find books about psychology, philosophy, ethics, and feelings in the 100s psychology and philosophy. This is also the classification where you would look for books on death and dying, superstitions, optical illusions and making friends. These are all books that can help you understand yourself. Some people call this classification the mind and thinking classification.The book presented is, Chicken Soup for the Teenage Soul by Jack Canfield, Mark Victor Hansen, and Kimberly Kirberger. This batch of CHICKEN SOUP contains important lessons on the nature of friendship & love, the importance of belief in the future, the value of respect for oneself & others, & much more. An inspirational collection of writings, about one-third by teenagers, that discuss the problems of growing up & how others have faced them. Stories of compassion and heroism celebrate those who are making a difference. Most American heroes aren't in our history books, nor do they have monuments erected in their honor. Their names aren't in the headline news or memorialized in song. The true hero is simply someone who makes a difference-large or small-in the lives of others. They battle disease, crime, poverty and human rights violations. They clean up environments, mentor neglected children and truly care about others. Most importantly, anyone can be a hero in the eyes of another.

12How did we get here? Who made me and why?200-299 Religion and Myths

http://www.clipartguide.com/_search_terms/questions.html13Dewey then asked Who made me? and How did we get here? Some people say this is man thinking about God.

200-299 Religion and Myths

Who made me? and How did we get here?

http://books.google.com/books/about/Religions_of_the_World.html?id=IdOfHAAACAAJ

291 BREPhoto source: Has Slone from Langford library..November 2011digital photo200s Religion and Myths: most of the classifications refer to the Christian faith and its main denominations, history and beliefs. The last section (290) includes Judaism, Islam and other world religions-and includes Greek & Roman mythology. The book presented is, Religions of the world:the illustrated guide to origins, beliefs, traditions and festivals, by Elizabeth Breuilly, Joanne O'Brien, Martin Palmer . Grade 8 UpThis book, originally published in 1997, has been revisedessentially, according to the authors, because of the rapidly changing role, status and place of religion. However, the alterations are so minor that they are virtually unnoticeable. Only the final page, Faith in the Future, has been entirely rewrittenbut the earlier material is still perfectly valid. And, unfortunately, the new edition is inconsistent in updating statistics. The membership of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is still given as about five million worldwide when it is well over 12 million. Figures in the sections on Hinduism and Jainism contradict other areas of the book; Sikhism quotes numbers from 1993, and Islam uses a 1996 calendar. Such sloppiness detracts from the books usefulness and questions its necessity. Religions is a valuable resource, covering the beliefs and practices of 10 major religions and lavishly illustrated with color photos, maps, diagrams, and charts; but libraries owning the earlier edition need not replace it.14http://www.clipartguide.com/_search_terms/questions.htmlWho are those people ? Why are they different? 300-399Social Sciences

Who and Why?15Dewey also thought about other people, not just himself. He wanted to know about his neighbors and the people in the world.

300-399Social Sciences Who are those people? Why are they different?

This section includes issues that affect our society like politics and laws and government, Economics, Law, Public administration, Social services (welfare and social issues), Education and Commerce.

For a review of the text shown at right:http://www.powells.com/biblio/1-0618504362-0

361.92 FRAPhoto source: Has Slone from Langford library..November 2011digital photo300 s Social sciences and Customs (fairytales). This section includes issues that affect our society like politics and laws and government, Economics, Law, Public administration, Social services (welfare and social issues), Education and Commerce. Also in this section would be etiquette (manners) and Fairytales/folktales. If you would want to read about how the United States votes for our president you would find the book in the 300s Social Sciences. You will also find the topics of customs, politics, and folklore in the 300s. The 300s are books about how we live and the things we do.

The book presented is,Jane Addams: Champion of Democracy by Judith Bloom Fraden and Dennis Brindell Fraden. Most people know Jane Addams (1860-1935) as the force behind Hull House, one of the first settlement houses in the United States. She was also an ardent suffragist and civil rights activist, co-founding the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and the American Civil Liberties Union. But it was her work as a pacifist that put her in the international spotlight. Although many people labeled her unpatriotic for her pacifist activities, she was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1931 and, at the time of her death, Jane Addams was one of the most respected and admired women in the world. In this well-researched and inspiring account, acclaimed husband-and-wife team, Dennis Brindell Fradin and Judith Bloom Fradin, draw upon hundreds of historical documents and archival photographs to create a revealing portrait of the woman whose very way of life made her an American icon.

16 http://www.clipartguide.com/_search_terms/questions.htmlHow can I communicate with others? 400-499 Language

17Dewey knew the communication with other people was important so he created a classification for languages.

400-499Language (Dictionaries, Grammar)

How can I communicate with others?ELA6RC3 The student acquires new vocabulary in each content area and uses it correctly. The student a. Demonstrates an understanding of contextual vocabulary in various subjects. c. Explores understanding of new words found in subject area texts. Below is a website to read about this book. http://www.eslteachersboard.com/cgi-bin/books/index.pl?read=1

428.2 JOHPhoto source: Has Slone from Langford library..November 2011digital photo400s - Languages. How can I communicate with others? Many of the sections are dedicated to specific languages (French, German, Spanish, Italian). This is where you find dictionaries (English/Spanish), and books on the language itself (including grammar). The 490s are used for other languages and also include native languages (like Asian and African dialects).The book presented is, The Handbook of Good English by Edward D. Johnson. The book is highly informative, practical, easily readable and understandable, and quite comprehensive. The author covers all potential combinations and problems in grammar and usage. Even though allowing exceptions to archaic rules and being much more tolerant than uptight grammarians, the author points out to good solid rules. In addition to these rules, he shows the way to a more expressive style and persuasive form of writing.The author must have gained an in-depth understanding of the problems of a struggling writer or a copy editor. In the beginning of the 'Grammar' section, he explains why he added the glossary/index. "It is often difficult for those who do not know the name of the error they may be committing to find the discussion of that error in a reference book. I have done my best to reduce this difficulty by careful listings in the Glossary/Index, but the reader may have to do some skimming of the rules and their discussions. To help the skimming eye, I have subdivided the longer discussions, and when possible I have begun paragraphs with examples of specific constructions that may match the reader's problem."

18How can I understand the world around me?500-599 Sciencehttp://www.acclaimimages.com/photos-images/question.html

19Dewey wanted to know how we could understand the nature and the world around us . 500-599 Science (Math, Chemistry, Plants, Animals, Astronomy)

How can I understand the world around me?

S6E2. Students will understand the effects of the relative positions of the earth, moon and sun.

S6E5. Students will investigate the scientific view of how the earths surface is formed.

A website for the Review of this book is below. http://www.galateaodyssey.org/files/EarthFromSpace.Guide.pdf

525 GREPhoto source: Has Slone from Langford library..November 2011digital photo500s Science, (Math, Chemistry, Plants, Animals, Astronomy). How can I understand the world around me? In this section you will find math, Astronomy (Space), physics, chemistry, earth sciences (Rocks and weather), Paleontology (dinosaurs!), Life sciences (Biology), Plants and Zoology (science of Animals)The book presented is, Space Guides: Exploring the Earth by Peter Grego.20How can I use science and math?600-699 Applied Science and Technologyhttp://www.acclaimimages.com/photos-images/question.html

21He then asked how could we use science and math in our world.600-699Applied Science and Technology

How can I use science and math?

This classification covers the technology fields and includes medicine, engineering, agriculture, home economics, general management, manufacturing and buildings and construction. The books in the 600s are books that are more technical in nature..

612.8 SIMPhoto source: Has Slone from Langford library..November 2011digital photo600s Applied Science and Technology: (How can I use Science and Math?). This class covers the technology fields and includes medicine, engineering, agriculture, home economics, general management, manufacturing and buildings and construction. Here you can find books about the human body (including the 5 senses and the different parts of the body). The books in the 600s are books that are more technical in nature.The book presented is Out of Sight: Pictures of hidden worlds by Seymour Simon. From deep within the human body to distant nebulae in outer space, there are worlds all around us that are smaller, faster, and farther than the unaided eye can see. In these thirty-six amazing images, you can see the invisible: from a white blood cell attacking E. coli bacteria, to the delicate splash from a falling drop of water captured by a high-speed strobe. With pictures that astound and fascinating explanations of how each image was captured, award-winning author Seymour Simon takes readers on a fantastic voyage that's truly out of sight.

22www.hikercentral.com What can I do with my free time? 700-799Fine Arts (Recreation)

www.clipartheaven.com 23Dewey was a serious person but he knew that people liked to relax and have fun. 700-799 Fine Arts (Painting, Music, Photography, Dance, Sports)

What can I do with my free time?

The 700 section includes books on the arts , architecture, sports and hobbies.

Below is a website to see reviews of this book.

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/good-walk-spoiled-john-feinstein/1001861363#EditorialReviews

796.3 FEI Photo source: Has Slone from Langford library..November 2011digital photo700s Fine arts- this section includes the arts including landscaping and architecture in addition to drawing and painting. It also covers hobbies, sports and recreation. Joke books and information on collectibles are in this classification too. The book presented is A good walk spoiled: Days and nights on the PGA tour by John Feinstein.To Mark Twain, golf was ``a good walk spoiled,'' but to the 200 or so top professional players, it is a sometimes lucrative but always nerve-wracking career in which this week's hero can be next week's bum, and in which athletes have only themselves to blame if they fail. Feinstein's (A Season on the Brink) lively and anecdotal style makes for an interesting read but cannot overcome the 1990s' objection to the sport-that there is no superstar of the stature of Arnold Palmer or Jack Nicklaus to capture the public's fancy. So although there are media favorites such as Greg Norman, there are many outstanding players (Davis Love III, Paul Azinger) whom Feinstein brings to life here but who fail to generate the excitement of the greats. Feinstein, kind and upbeat, also points out that, almost without exception, golfers share a political viewpoint that is far to the right of Rush Limbaugh, with much self-pity for the taxes they have to pay on their six-and seven-figure incomes. 24What are the stories of our lives? 800-899 Literature, Poetrywww.learnbsl.org

victoriareitano.com 25Dewey knew that it was important to save mans stories. 800-899LiteraturePoetry, Plays, Criticism

What are the stories of our lives?

ELA6/7/8R1 The student demonstrates comprehension and shows evidence of a warranted and responsible explanation of a variety of literary and informational texts. h. Responds to and explains the effects of sound, figurative language, and graphics in order to uncover meaning in literature: i. Sound (e.g., alliteration, onomatopoeia, rhyme scheme) ii. Figurative language (i.e., simile, metaphor, hyperbole, personification)

823.01 COR Photo source: Has Slone from Langford library..November 2011digital photo800s - Literature- What are the stories of our lives? This classification has sections for many different languages and includes literature, poetry, drama and other forms of writing. This is where you can also find literary criticism (books that analyze other books). There are divisions for literature, poetry , essays and letters from America, England and other countries.The book being presented is The Faber Book of Modern Fairy Tales by Sara Corin. Fifteen original stories written during the last 100 years by such authors as Ted Hughes, James Thurber, Joan Aiken, Philippa Pearce, and Walter de la Mare.

26What was the world like in the past? Where can I travel in the world? 900-999 History, Geography, Biographybesttravelwebsites.com

fess2.blogspot.com 27Dewey also knew that is was important for people to know about their past. He felt that if people knew about their past they could understand everything else.

900-999 History, Geography, Biography

This last section includes geography of the United States and the World (like maps and travel books).

What was the world like in the past? Where can I go in the world?

ELA8RC1 The student reads a minimum of 25 grade-level appropriate books or book equivalents (approximately 1,000,000 words) per year from a variety of subject disciplines. The student reads both informational and fictional texts in a variety of genres and modes of discourse, including technical texts related to various subject areas.

A book review is provided at the website below.

http://www.bookrags.com/studyguide-undauntedcourage/?gclid=CP-SreSymawCFcG77Qodc1yILg

920 AMB900s- Geography and History. (What was the world like in the past? Where can I go in the world?) This is where you will find books about different states and countries. You will also find travel books and books about native people in this section. Biographies go here too but are shelved separately in a lot of media centers. This classification also includes the history of all the different areas of the world (and 999 books are about the extraterrestrial world!)The book being presented is Undaunted Courage by Stephen Ambrose.28Exceptions-A -- Bibliographies -- Shelved before 016 B -- Biographies -- Shelved before 920 or by themselvesC -- College Catalogs -- Shelved before 380

-

B for Biography1st 3 letters of person who the Biography is written about

BEINBEINAlbert EinsteinEinstein: The man and his timesBiographies are classified in the 920s but are often shelved by themselves. Almost done with Dewey...but there's one final twist. A while back, the people who make changes to the system (like adding a call number for "Computers" or "Professional Wrestling") decided that three subjects just had too many books in them. To make things easier, they decided to catalog all the new books in these categories with letters rather than numbers. Thankfully, they only changed three, so that's all you have to remember: A -- Bibliographies -- Shelved before 016 B -- Biographies -- Shelved before 920 C -- College Catalogs -- Shelved before 380 So, if the Dewey number for a biography of Lincoln would have been 920.L345n, it would now be B.L345n, and it would be shelved just before 920, where older biographies of Lincoln might also be found(at 920.L345). Weird, but true. 29Where is the number and What does it mean???Where: The number is found on the spine of the book near the bottom-What: Each number relates to a specific topic. For example, 200.3 STE would be a dictionary (.3) about religion (200) Written by someone whose last name begins with STEDictionary of Christian Faith

200 Religion.3 Dictionaries & Encyclopedias 1st 3 initials of Authors name Christian Faith200.3 STE

The Dewey Decimal Classification System, devised by Melville Dewey in 1873, is a system for organizing library materials by subject discipline. Subject areas are divided into ten classes: 000-099 Generalities 100-199 Philosophy and Psychology 200-299 Religion 300-399 Social Sciences 400-499 Language 500-599 Natural Sciences and Mathematics 600-699 Technology(Applied Sciences) 700-799 Arts 800-899 Literature and Rhetoric 900-999 Geography and History These classes are further subdivided into more specific categories. For example, within the 800-899 Literature and Rhetoric class, 820-830 contains material specifically on English Literature and Rhetoric, 822 narrows it to works of English Drama, and 822.33 is the works of Shakespeare.By assigning related subjects similar call numbers, the Dewey Decimal System helps to keep material for similar disciplines together. There are, however, some fields that draw on knowledge from many different disciplines--therefore, don't expect all books on one subject to be shelved in one place! Material about Airports, for example, can be found in: Social Sciences(general--387.726) Arts(architecture of--725.39) and Applied Sciences(construction of--690.539) It all depends on the specific focus of the work

Almost done with Dewey...but there's one final twist. A while back, the people who make changes to the system (like adding a call number for "Computers" or "Professional Wrestling") decided that three subjects just had too many books in them. To make things easier, they decided to catalog all the new books in these categories with letters rather than numbers. Thankfully, they only changed three, so that's all you have to remember: A -- Bibliographies -- Shelved before 016 B -- Biographies -- Shelved before 920 C -- College Catalogs -- Shelved before 380 So, if the Dewey number for a biography of Lincoln would have been 920.L345n, it would now be B.L345n, and it would be shelved just before 920, where older biographies of Lincoln might also be found(at 920.L345). Weird, but true.

30Post-Test: How much did you learn?

1) Who created the Dewey Decimal System?A) Robert E. LeeB) Melville DeweyC) Huey, Louie and DeweyD) John Henry

2) Where would you look for some World War II information?A) 133.5B) 636C) 940.6D) 001.93) Where would you find something about William Shakespeare?A) 940.5B) 421.5B) 822.3D) 616.9

4) The Dewey Decimal System is composed of how many main sections?A) 100C) 50B) 25D) 10

5) Where do we find the DDC call numbers on a book?A) on the front coverB) with the prefaceC) on the spine of a bookD) on the back cover

6 ) What does the Dewey Decimal Classification number look like?A) ABC.DEFB) 123.456C) all of the aboveD) none of the above

Answers: 1) B 2) C 3) B 4) D 5) C 6) C31Practical Application: Match these up?

000s Generalities100s Philosophy & Psychology200s Religion & Mythology300s Social Sciences400s Languages and Grammar500s Natural Sciences & Mathematics600s Technology700s The Arts & Recreation800s Literature900s History, Geography & BiographiesImage from http://www.brooklynexpedition.org/structures/infomania/dewey/dewey_quest_def.html32Practical Application: Lets see what you can remember about what kinds of books fit in the different classifications. Answers:1960s in the USA 900s History, Geography, and BiographiesScience Fiction 800s LiteratureLearn to Speak Spanish 400s LanguageMathematics 500s Natural Sciences and MathFootball 700s The Arts and RecreationUnderstanding Your Dreams 100s Philosophy & PsychologyNautical Atlas 000s GeneralitiesGreek Gods and Heroes 200s Religion and MythologyStories from Around the World 300s Social Science, Folk & Fairy TalesBuild Your Own Computer 600s TechnologyFor more information:A website by students for students about Dewey athttp://library.thinkquest.org/5002/Dewey games to practice athttp://www.rce.k12tn.net/lmc/dds%20games.htmlA great multimedia presentation that breaks down the information in question and answer format athttp://www.oclc.org/dewey/resources/tour/ddc6.htmlMore information about Deweyhttp://www.experiencefestival.com/melville_deweyDewey Decimal System RAPhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NHiUQb5xg7A&feature=channel_video_title

Websites that you can go to if you want to learn more about the Dewey Decimal System.33BibliographyAmbrose, S. (1997). Undaunted Courage. New York: Simon and Schuster.Breuilly, E. (2006). Religions of the World: Illustrated Guide to Origins, Beliefs, Traditions and Festivals. Australia: HarperCollins Publishers.Caufield, J. (1997). Chicken Soup for the Teenage Soul. Deerfield Beach, FL. : Health Communications INC.Corrin, S. (2003). The Faber Book of Modern Fairy Tales. London: Faber and Faber.Feinstein, J. (1996). A Good Walk Spoiled: Days and Nights on the PGA Tour. Boston: Little, Brown and Company.Fraden, J. (2006). Jane Addams: Champion of Democracy. New York: Clarion Books.GPS by Grade Level. (2008). Retrieved from GADOE/Georgia Standards: https://www.georgiastandards.org/standards/Pages/BrowseStandards/GPS_by_Grade_Level_K-8.aspxGrego, P. (2008). Space Guides: Exploring the Earth. Kent, U.K.: QEB Publishing.Hayes, S. (2009, Mar 10). The Dewey Decimal Rap. Retrieved from www.youtube.com: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NHiUQb5xg7A&feature=channel_video_title

34How the Dewey Decimal Classification System Works: retrieved athttp://www.slais.ubc.ca/courses/libr517/02-03-2/projects/dewey/table_of_contents.htmJames Walker Library, Middle Tennessee State University. (2011). Let's Do Dewey. Retrieved from MTSU.edu: http://frank.mtsu.edu/~vvesper/dewey2.htmJohnson, E. (1991). The Handbook of Good English. New York: Washington Square Press.Learning Stewards. (2011). Background Research Notes: Code Reform (Attempts) History. Retrieved from www.childrenofthecode.org: http://www.childrenofthecode.org/code-history/dewey.htmPrescott, S. (2001, August 1). If You Knew Dewey. Retrieved from www.schoollibraryjournal.com: http://www.schoollibraryjournal.com/article/CA148748.htmlRothman, K. (2001). Dangers on the Internet: Staying safe on-line. New York: Rosen Publishing Group.Simon, S. (2000). Out of Sight: Pictures of Hidden Worlds. New York: Sea Star Books.Note: pictures are clipart unless otherwise credited.

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