Create Rich Areas Color in One Layer - Amazon S3 pencil, kneaded eraser, pencil sharpener, ruler, Prismacolor

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  • Supplies: quality medium-grained drawing paper (white), HB graphite pencil, kneaded eraser, pencil sharpener, ruler, Prismacolor Premier brand (or similar professional quality) colored pencils

    Resources: • 8.3.R1 Welcome to the World of

    Colored Pencil! • 8.3.R2 Introduction to Techniques • 8.3.A1 Experiment with Pencil

    Techniques

    This activity has four sections:

    • Juxtapose to Refine Areas of Color

    • Juxtapose Analogous Colors for Vibrancy

    • Juxtapose Complementary Colors for Emphasis

    • Juxtapose Similar Colors for Subtle Value Changes

    ISBN: 978-1-77193-159-5 Copyright © 2015 Tannis Trydal and Drawspace Publishing (http://www.drawspace.com). All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, transferred, or transmitted in any form or by any means,

    including electronic, digital, mechanical, recording, photographing, photocopying, or otherwise, without the purchase of an educators’ license from drawspace.com or the prior written consent of Tannis Trydal and Drawspace Publishing.

    Create Rich Areas of Color in One Layer

    Juxtapose colors to render rich and complex hues all in one layer

    Level: Beginner Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level: 9.5 Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 54.0 Drawspace Curriculum 8.3.A6 - 4 Pages and 10 Illustrations

    ArtSpeak

    Juxtaposition: An aspect of composition that refers to the close placement of elements (whether objects, colors, lines, or forms) in order to compare or contrast their relationships and/or enhance the message or meaning of the artwork. For example, an artist might juxtapose two or more objects which have opposite associations or interpretations (such as putting something new and shiny beside something that is old and weathered), or juxtapose two analogous colors (such as orange and yellow orange) to increase vibrancy. Color Wheel: A circular arrangement of colors used to reference primary, secondary, and tertiary colors as well as their relationships to one another. Primary Colors: Yellow, red, and blue. All other colors originate from primary colors and no combinations of other colors can make primary colors. You can create millions of different colors by mixing the primary colors with other colors in various combinations. Secondary Colors: The colors orange, green, and violet (also called purple), which are created by mixing two primary colors together. Tertiary Colors: The colors red-orange, yellow-orange, yellow- green, blue-green, blue-purple, and red-purple, which are created by mixing a primary color with the secondary color beside it on the color wheel. Analogous colors: Hues that are beside one another on the color wheel.

  • 2 Drawspace Curriculum 8.3.A6

    ISBN: 978-1-77193-159-5 Copyright © 2015 Tannis Trydal and Drawspace Publishing (http://www.drawspace.com). All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, transferred, or transmitted in any form or by any means,

    including electronic, digital, mechanical, recording, photographing, photocopying, or otherwise, without the purchase of an educators’ license from drawspace.com or the prior written consent of Tannis Trydal and Drawspace Publishing.

    Juxtapose to Refine Areas of Color

    Figure 2Figure 1

    Figure 4Figure 3

    ArtSpeak

    Complementary colors: A set of two colors that are directly opposite one another on the color wheel (such as red and green, yellow and purple, and orange and blue). When juxtaposed, these colors seem brighter and more vibrant. Hue: Another word for a color (such as red, blue, or teal).

    Challenge!

    Study the color wheel in Figure 1 to discover which hues are analogous (side- by-side). Study the color wheel in Figure 2 to discover which hues are complementary (opposite one another).

    1. Press gently with an HB pencil and use a ruler to draw a square 1.5 by 1.5 in (3.8 by 3.8 cm).

    2. Prepare a colored pencil from the blue hue family with a dull tip (Figure 3).

    3. Use the basic stroke to evenly shade the first square with a coarse grain (Figure 4).

    4. Prepare a colored pencil from the purple hue family with a sharp pencil tip (Figure 5).

  • 3Drawspace Curriculum 8.3.A6

    ISBN: 978-1-77193-159-5 Copyright © 2015 Tannis Trydal and Drawspace Publishing (http://www.drawspace.com). All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, transferred, or transmitted in any form or by any means,

    including electronic, digital, mechanical, recording, photographing, photocopying, or otherwise, without the purchase of an educators’ license from drawspace.com or the prior written consent of Tannis Trydal and Drawspace Publishing.

    Figure 5 Figure 65. Use the sharpened tip to apply pigment into the white spots of the coarsely grained square (Figure 6).

    When viewed from a distance, the juxtaposed colors within the square appear blue purple, but when viewed up close, the individual specks of blue and purple are visible. You can use any contrasting colors to create new, complex colors.

    Juxtapose Analogous Colors for Vibrancy

    Figure 7 Figure 8

    1. Press gently with an HB pencil and use a ruler to draw a square 1.5 by 1.5 in (3.8 by 3.8 cm).

    2. Choose a pair of analogous colored pencils and prepare each with a sharp tip.

    3. Juxtapose the pair of analogous colored pencils to create an area of tone (Figure 7) or a pattern (Figure 8).

    Shade a small section of each color side- by-side so they touch one another or slightly overlap where they meet.

    You can use the basic stroke, scumbling, striking strokes, pointillism, or any other pencil techniques to create areas of tone, texture or a pattern.

    ArtSpeak

    Pointillism: A method of drawing or painting using several layers of small colored dots, strokes, or individual brushstrokes of multiple colors. When viewed from a distance, the dots in pointillist paintings appear to blend to create the illusion of depth, mass, and form. Scumbling: Applying a thin or broken layer of color over another so that areas of the color beneath show through. Stippling: (Also called stipple or stippled) A shading technique in which a series of dots are arranged in groups to create the illusion of different values of the same color.

    Tip!

    Juxtaposing with colored pencils refers to placing solid colors beside one another. You can juxtapose small areas of color or large areas of color.

  • ISBN: 978-1-77193-159-5 Copyright © 2015 Tannis Trydal and Drawspace Publishing (http://www.drawspace.com). All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, transferred, or transmitted in any form or by any means,

    including electronic, digital, mechanical, recording, photographing, photocopying, or otherwise, without the purchase of an educators’ license from drawspace.com or the prior written consent of Tannis Trydal and Drawspace Publishing.

    4 Drawspace Curriculum 8.3.A6

    Caution!

    Overlapping complementary colors will create a dull and greyed area.

    Juxtapose Complementary Colors for Emphasis 1. Press gently with an HB pencil and use a ruler

    to draw a square 1.5 by 1.5 in (3.8 by 3.8 cm).

    2. Choose a pair of complementary colored pencils and prepare each with a sharp tip.

    3. Juxtapose the pair of complementary colored pencils to create a pattern (Figure 9).

    Try not to overlap colors. Use your imagination to create a design or pattern of your own.

    Juxtapose Similar Colors for Subtle Value Changes 1. Press gently with an HB pencil and use a ruler

    to draw a square 1.5 by 1.5 in (3.8 by 3.8 cm).

    2. Choose three or four colored pencils that are similar and prepare each with a sharp tip.

    3. Begin by shading with the lightest color and then apply the next lightest color alongside it (Figure 10).

    4. Continue shading a section with the medium color and then the dark color.

    5. Gently overlap the colors to create a smooth transition from one color into the next.

    Figure 9

    Figure 10

    Caution!

    Too many layers of pigment can cause unsightly wax build up. Juxtaposing reduces the number of layers needed to draw finely grained tonal areas.

    As an Aside

    When I am composing a drawing, I often use a color to emphasize the focal point and then surround it with all different values of its complementary color.

    As an Aside

    When viewed from a distance, juxtaposed colors appear to blend.