Chapter 23: The Transition Elements and Their Coordination Compounds 23.1 An Overview of Transition Element Properties 23.2 The Inner Transition Elements

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Text of Chapter 23: The Transition Elements and Their Coordination Compounds 23.1 An Overview of Transition...

  • Slide 1
  • Chapter 23: The Transition Elements and Their Coordination Compounds 23.1 An Overview of Transition Element Properties 23.2 The Inner Transition Elements 23.3 Highlights of Selected Transition Metals 23.4 Coordination Compounds 23.5 Theoretical Basis for the Bonding and Properties of Complexes
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  • Fig. 23.1
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  • Orbital Occupancy of the Period 4 MetalsI Element Partial Orbital Diagram Unpaired Electrons Sc 1 Ti 2 V 3 Cr 6 Mn 5 4s 3d 4p Table 23.1 (p. 1003)
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  • Orbital Occupancy of the Period 4 MetalsII Element Partial Orbital Diagram Unpaired Electrons Fe 4 Co 3 Ni 2 Cu 1 Zn 0 4s 3d 4p Table 23.1 (p. 1003)
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  • Fig. 23.3
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  • Fig. 23.4
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  • Aqueous Oxoanions of V, Cr, and Mn in their Highest Oxidation States Fig 23.5
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  • Oxidation States and d-Orbital Occupancy of the Period 4 Transition Metals 3B 4B 5B 6B 7B 8B 8B 8B 1B 2B Oxidation (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) State Sc Ti V Cr Mn Fe Co Ni Cu Zn 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 (d 1 ) (d 2 ) (d 3 ) (d 5 ) (d 5 ) (d 6 ) (d 7 ) (d 8 ) (d 10 ) (d 10 ) +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 (d 3 ) (d 5 ) (d 5 ) (d 7 ) (d 8 ) (d 10 ) +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 (d 2 ) (d 3 ) (d 4 ) (d 5 ) (d 6 ) (d 7 ) (d 8 ) (d 9 ) (d 10 ) +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 (d 0 ) (d 1 ) (d 2 ) (d 3 ) (d 4 ) (d 5 ) (d 6 ) (d 7 ) (d 8 ) +4 +4 +4 +4 (d 0 ) (d 1 ) (d 2 ) (d 3 ) (d 4 ) (d 5 ) (d 6 ) +5 +5 +5 +5 +5 (d 0 ) (d 1 ) (d 2 ) (d 4 ) +6 +6 (d 0 ) (d 1 ) (d 2 ) +7 +7 (d 0 ) Table 23.2 (p. 1006)
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  • Standard Electrode Potentials of Period 4 M 2+ Ions Half-Reaction E 0 (V) Ti 2+ (aq) + 2 e - Ti (s) -1.63 V 2+ (aq) + 2 e - V (s) -1.19 Cr 2+ (aq) + 2 e - Cr (s) -0.91 Mn 2+ (aq) + 2 e - Mn (s) -1.18 Fe 2+ (aq) + 2 e - Fe (s) -0.44 Co 2+ (aq) + 2 e - Co (s) -0.28 Ni 2+ (aq) + 2 e - Ni (s) -0.25 Cu 2+ (aq) + 2 e - Cu (s) 0.34 Zn 2+ (aq) + 2 e - Zn (s) -0.76 Table 23.3 (p. 1007)
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  • Colors of Representative Compounds of the Period 4 Transition Metals b ac d e f g h i j a = Scandium oxide b = Titanium(IV) oxide c = Vanadyl sulfate dihydrate d = Sodium chromate e = Manganese(II) chloride tetrahydrate f = Potassium ferricyanide g = Cobalt(II) chloride hexahydrate h = Nickel(II) nitrate hexahydrate i = Copper(II) sulfate pentahydrate j = Zinc sulfate heptahydrate Fig. 23.6
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  • (p. 1012)
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  • Coordination Compounds: Complexes Lewis acids are electron pair acceptors. Coordination compounds are metal compounds formed by Lewis acid-base interactions. Complexes: Have a metal ion (can be zero oxidation state) bonded to a number of ligands. Complex ions are charged. Example, [Ag(NH 3 ) 2 ] +. Ligands are Lewis bases. Coordination number: the number of ligands attached to the metal.
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  • Coordination Numbers and Geometry The most common coordination numbers are 4 and 6. Some metal ions have a constant coordination number (e.g. Cr 3+ and Co 3+ have a coordination number of 6). The size of the ligand affects the coordination number (e.g. [FeF 6 ] 3- forms but only [FeCl 4 ] - is stable). The amount of charge transferred from ligand to metal affects coordination number (e.g. [Ni(NH 3 ) 6 ] 2+ is stable but only [Ni(CN) 4 ] 2- is stable). Four coordinate complexes are either tetrahedral or square planar (commonly seen for d 8 metal ions). Six coordinate complexes are octahedral.
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  • Fig. 23.9 (Square brackets enclose the metal ion and ligands.)
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  • (p. 1017)
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  • Ligands Monodentate ligands bind through one donor atom only. Therefore they occupy only one coordination site. Polydentate ligands (or chelating agents) bind through more than one donor atom per ligand. Example, ethylenediamine (en), H 2 NCH 2 CH 2 NH 2. The octahedral [Co(en) 3 ] 3+ is a typical en complex. Chelate effect: More stable complexes are formed with chelating agents than with the equivalent number of monodentate ligands.
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  • (p. 1018)
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  • Nomenclature Rules: For salts, name the cation before the anion. Example in [Co(NH 3 ) 5 Cl]Cl 2 we name [Co(NH 3 ) 5 Cl] 2+ before Cl -. Within a complex ion, the ligands are named (in alphabetical order) before the metal. Example [Co(NH 3 ) 5 Cl] 2+ is tetraamminechlorocobalt(II). Note the tetra portion is an indication of the number of NH 3 groups and is therefore not considered in the alphabetizing of the ligands. Anionic ligands end in -o and neutral ligands are simply the name of the molecule. Exceptions: H 2 O (aqua) and NH 3 (ammine).
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  • Nomenclature Rules: Greek prefixes are used to indicate number of ligands (di-, tri-, tetra-, penta-, and hexa-). Exception: if the ligand name has a Greek prefix already. Then enclose the ligand name in parentheses and use bis-, tris-, tetrakis-, pentakis-, and hexakis. Example [Co(en) 3 ]Cl 3 is tris(ethylenediamine)cobalt(III) chloride. If the complex is an anion, the name ends in -ate. Oxidation state of the metal is given in Roman numerals in parenthesis at the end of the complex name.
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  • Names of Some Neutral and Anionic Ligands Name Formula A. Neutral Aqua H 2 O Ammine NH 3 Carbonyl CO Nitrosyl NO B. Anionic Fluoro F - Chloro Cl - Bromo Br - Iodo I - Hydroxo OH - Cyano CN - Table 23.8 (p. 1019)
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  • Names of Some Metal Ions in Complex Anions Metal Name in Anion Iron Ferrate Copper Cuprate Lead Plumbate Silver Argentate Gold Aurate Tin Stannate Table 23.9 (p. 1019)
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  • Some Coordination Compounds of Cobalt Studied by Werner Werners Data* Traditional Total Free Modern Charge of Formula Ions Cl - Formula Complex Ion CoCl 3 6 NH 3 4 3 [Co(NH 3 ) 6 ]Cl 3 3+ CoCl 3 5 NH 3 3 2 [Co(NH 3 ) 5 Cl]Cl 2 2+ CoCl 3 4 NH 3 2 1 [Co(NH 3 ) 4 Cl 2 ]Cl 1+ CoCl 3 3 NH 3 0 0 [Co(NH 3 ) 3 Cl 3 ] ---.... Table 23.10 (p. 1020)