CECA World History Geography - 8_9_10.pdfCECA World History Geography. ... Chapter 8.3 – Connections Across Time Culture ... romanticism realism impressionism.

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  • CECA World History & Geography1st Quarter Week-8,9,10

    Date Homework Assignment Stamp

    Monday 9/25

    Read 8.3 2 pages of Cornell Notes

    Tuesday 9/26

    8.2 & 8.3 Repetitions

    Wednesday 9/27

    Read 8.4 2 pages of Cornell Notes

    Thursday 9/28

    8.4 Repetitions Study for tomorrows GEOGRAPHY QUIZ ALL of Africa & All of Europe

    Homework Due Tomorrow Friday 9/29

    WORKSHEET Chapter 8 After you Read Page 1

    Monday 10/2

    WORKSHEET Chapter 8 After you Read Page 2 Homework Due Tomorrow

    Tuesday 10/3

    WORKSHEET Chapter 8 Building Vocabulary Part A, B, & C

    Wednesday 10/4

    WORKSHEET - Chapter 8.2 Primary Source 1&2

    Homework Due Tomorrow

    Thursday 10/5

    WORKSHEET - Chapter 8.3 Connections Across Time & CultureStudy for tomorrows GEOGRAPHY QUIZ ALL of Americas & Asia

    Friday 10/6

    WORKSHEET - Chapter 8.4 HistoryMakers

    Monday 10/9

    No School Teacher Work Day

    Tuesday 10/10

    IF needed, Finish your essay and have it ready for peer review tomorrow

    Wednesday 10/11

    Finalize essay and turn in on time Homework Due Tomorrow

    Thursday 10/12

    Study for tomorrows Chapter 8 exam Study for tomorrows GEOGRAPHY QUIZ Physical: Alps through English Channel

    Friday 10/13

    End of 1st Quarter

    55 points total 4 points for each assignment finished and attached 1 point for each stamp

  • Outline Maps 9

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    The World: Physical

    015-wh10a-GSOM_P9 12/15/2003 9:38 AM Page 9

    Physical:AlpsAmazon RiverAndes Mts. Appalachian Mts.Arctic OceanAtlas Mts Baffin IslandBaltic SeaBering SeaBering StraitBlack SeaBorneo IslandCaribbean SeaCaspian SeaCerro AconcaguaColorado RiverCoral SeaDanube RiverEast China SeaEnglish Channel

  • confederation Group that joinstogether for a common purposeczar Emperor of Russiaethnic Related to a religious, racial,national, or cultural groupexile State of being sent awayfrom ones own country

    flee Run awayGothic novel Stories filled withfear, violence, or supernaturaleventsgrim Harsh; hard to bearlegislatures Law-making bodies

    mestizos People with mixedEuropean and Indian ancestryturmoil Disorder or confusionunify Unite; create one country outof separate states or other politicaldivisions

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    CHAPTER 8 NATIONALIST REVOLUTIONS SWEEP THE WEST 93

    Name ______________________________________________________________ Date ______________________

    Glossary CHAPTER 8 Nationalist Revolutions Sweep the West

    Terms and NamesA. Write the name or term in each blank that best completes the meaning of the paragraph.

    AFTER YOU READ

    Camillo di Cavour

    Giuseppe Garibaldi

    the Balkans

    nationalism

    nation-state

    B. Write the letter of the name or term next to the description that explains it best.

    a. Otto von Bismarck

    b. Miguel Hidalgo

    c. Jos de San Martn

    d. Louis-Napoleon

    e. Simn Bolvar

    ____ 1. Emperor of France

    ____ 2. Liberator of Chile and Argentina

    ____ 3. Liberator of Venezuela

    ____ 4. Prussian leader

    ____ 5. Priest who began the Mexican revolution

    In Europe, feelings of 1 __________________ were developing. People

    no longer felt loyal to a king, queen, or other ruler. Instead, they felt loyal

    to their own particular country, group, or 2 __________________. These

    feelings led to fights for self-rule by the Greeks. They had been part of a

    large region controlled by the Ottomans called 3 __________________.

    Feelings of national pride and a desire for unity also helped

    4 __________________ bring together the northern part of Italy. These

    same feelings helped 5__________________ unite the southern part of

    Italy.

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    94 CHAPTER 8 REVIEW

    Name ______________________________________________________________ Date ______________________

    AFTER YOU READ (continued) CHAPTER 8 Nationalist Revolutions Sweep the West

    Main Ideas1. How was society divided in Spanish colonies in the Americas?

    2. How did Mexico end Spanish rule?

    3. Why was nationalism a force for change in Europe?

    4. How did Otto von Bismarck unite Germany?

    5. What new artistic movements began in Europe at this time?

    Thinking CriticallyAnswer the following questions on a separate sheet of paper.

    1. Explain how the result of German unification was different than that of Italian unification.

    2. Why do you think realism replaced romanticism?

    mwh10a-RSG-0208_P10 12/16/2003 10:51 AM Page 94

  • Nationalist Revolutions Sweep the West 77

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    Name Date

    BUILDING VOCABULARY Nationalist Revolutions Sweep the West

    CHAPTER

    8

    1. In the late 1700s, people who had been born in Spain formed the top of Spanish-American society and were called (a) peninsulares (b) conservatives (c) mulattos.

    2. The creole general who won independence for Colombia and Venezuela was(a) Jos de San Martin (b) Miguel Hidalgo (c) Simn Bolvar.

    3. The creole general who won Chiles independence was (a) Jos de San Martin(b) Miguel Hidalgo (c) Simn Bolvar.

    4. The school of political thought that favored giving more power to electedparliaments, but with only the educated and the landowners voting, was called(a) conservative (b) liberal (c) radical.

    5. The belief that peoples greatest loyalty should not be to a king or an empirebut to a nation of people who share a common culture and history is called(a) nationalism (b) realpolitik (c) Russification.

    6. The German ruler who was a master of realpolitik, meaning the politics ofreality, was (a) Louis-Napoleon (b) Alexander II (c) Otto von Bismarck.

    A. Multiple Choice Circle the letter before the term or name that best completesthe sentence.

    B. Evaluating Write T in the blank if the statement is true. If the statement is false,write F in the blank and then write the corrected statement on the line below.

    ____ 1. Two early leaders of the independence movement in Mexico were Padre Miguel Hidalgoand Padre Jos Mara Morelos.

    ________________________________________________________________________

    ____ 2. The Junkers were radical Prussians who wanted to form an independent, democratic Germany.

    ________________________________________________________________________

    ____ 3. The drive for independence in Latin America was led by creoles, who were at the bottom of the social ladder.

    ________________________________________________________________________

    ____ 4. Camilo di Cavour, the prime minister of Piedmont-Sardinia, worked to unify Italy and make it a nation.

    ________________________________________________________________________

    C. Writing Write a paragraph identifying the following movements and explaininghow they were reflected in painting.

    romanticism realism impressionism

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    82 Unit 2, Chapter 8

    Name Date

    PRIMARY SOURCE Letter to Thomas Moorefrom George Gordon, Lord Byron

    The English romantic poet George Gordon, Lord Byron volunteered as a soldierfor the Greek cause during the war for Greek independence against the OttomanTurks. Byron wrote this letter to his friend Thomas Moore, an Anglo-Irish poet,about six weeks before his death at Missolonghi on April 19, 1824. According toByrons letter, what hardships did he face during wartime?

    Section 2

    Missolonghi, Western Greece, March 4, 1824My dear Moore,

    Your reproach is unfoundedI have receivedtwo letters from you, and answered both previousto leaving Cephalonia. I have not been quiet inan Ionian island, but much occupied with business,as the Greek deputies (if arrived) can tell you.Neither have I continued Don Juan, nor any otherpoem. You go, as usual, I presume, by some news-paper report or other.

    When the proper moment to be of some usearrived I came here; and am told that my arrival(with some other circumstances) has been of, atleast, temporary advantage to the cause. I had anarrow escape from the Turks, and another fromshipwreck, on my passage. On the 15th (or 16th) ofFebruary I had an attack of apoplexy, or epilepsythe physicians have not exactly decided which, butthe alternative is agreeable. My constitution, there-fore, remains between the two opinions, likeMahomets sarcophagus between the magnets. Allthat I can say is, that they nearly bled me to death,by placing the leeches too near the temporal artery,so that the blood could with difficulty be stopped,even with caustic. I am supposed to be getting bet-ter, slowly, however. But my homilies will, I pre-sume, for the future, be like the Archbishop ofGrenadasin this case, I order you a hundredducats from my treasurer, and wish you a littlemore taste.

    For public matters I refer you to ColonelStanhopes and Capt. Parrys reports and to all

    other reports whatsoever. There is plenty to dowar without, and tumult withinthey kill a man aweek, like Bob Acres in the country. Parrys artifi-cers have gone away in alarm, on account of a dis-pute in which some of the natives and foreignerswere engaged, and a Swede was killed, and aSuliote wounded. In the middle of their frightthere was a strong shock of an earthquake; so,between that and the sword, they boomed off in ahurry, in despite of all dissuasions to the contrary. ATurkish brig run ashore, etc., etc., etc.

    You, I presume, are either publishing or medi-tating that same. Let me hear from and of you, andbelieve me, in all events,

    Ever and affectionately yours,N. B.

    from W. H. Auden, ed., George Gordon, Lord Byron:Selected Poetry and Prose (New York: The New AmericanLibrary, 1966), 189190.

    Activity Options1. Recognizing Point of View As Thomas Moore,

    write a letter to your friend Byron in which youinquire about his health, his poetry, his role inthe Greek war for independence, and so forth.Share your letter with classmates.

    2. Using Sequential Order Make a time line toillustrate what happened to Byron after he leftCephalonia. List events that are mentioned inthis letter in chronological order.

    CHAPTER

    8

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    90 Unit 2, Chapter 8

    CONNECTIONS ACROSS TIME AND CULTURES

    Bonds That Create a Nation-StateAs you learned in Chapter 24, nationalism led to the formation of nation-states.In a nation-state, people are linked by such common bonds as government, cul-ture, and history. What common bonds do people in the United States todayshare? Work with a partner to fill in the chart below. If you need help, consult analmanac or encyclopedia.

    Name Date

    Section 3

    CHAPTER

    8THEMATIC CONNECTION:

    POWER AND AUTHORITY

    Common Bonds That Link the People of the United States Today

    1. Nationality:

    2. Territory/Land:

    3. Government:

    4. Language:

    5. Religion:

    6. Culture:

    7. Economy:

    8. Other:

    mwh10a-IDR-O208_P18 12/15/2003 2:03 PM Page 90

  • Nationalist Revolutions Sweep the West 89

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    Name Date

    HISTORYMAKERS Ludwig van BeethovenInnovative Genius

    . . . My most prized possession, my hearing, has greatly deteriorated. . . . Youwill realize what a sad life I must now lead, . . . cut off from everything that isdear and precious to me.Beethoven, letter to a friend (1801)

    Section 4

    Ludwig van Beethoven was a towering genius whose struggles in life gave his music greatpower. Born into the classical tradition, helaunched the romantic movement. Where vocalmusic had been thought the greatest achievementthat music could reach, he made instrumentalmusic supreme. He did all this despite being com-pletely deaf for the last ten years of his life.

    Beethovens struggles began early. His familybecame steadily poorer when his grandfather diedand his father became an alcoholic. Beethoven hadto leave school, and by age 18 he was supportinghis family. He was a talented piano player, andmusic became his career and his life. He studiedfor two months with another musical genius,Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, who proclaimed thisyoung man will make a great name for himself inthe world.

    In 1792, at age 22, Beethoven left his home inGermany for Vienna, Austria. At the time, Viennawas the center of European music. There weremany different professional groups, and thewealthy nobles were an eager audience. Beethovenplayed the piano at concerts. He also composedmusic, writing for both the piano and the orchestra.These early pieces were similar to the classical styleof music then in fashion.

    Around 1800, Beethoven found he was growingdeaf. He played fewer concerts and spent more ofhis time writing music. Each year, he spent thewarmer months in a rural village. He took walks inthe country, stopping only to jot down a new musi-cal idea. His notes show that he worked on somepieces for many years. Parts of his famous FifthSymphony were first written in 1804, but the sym-phony was not completed until 1808.

    Beethovens music became extremely popular.Critics praised his work, and wealthy nobles paidBeethoven to dedicate a piece to them. Starting in1808and until his death in 1827he received anannual salary from several nobles so that he coulddevote himself to writing. His life was without luxu-ry, however, and visitors might have thought him

    poor. He never married, but after his death threeletters that had never been sent were foundaddressed to a woman he called his ImmortalBeloved. Her identity has never been revealed.

    In 1804, Beethoven launched a new style ofmusic when he wrote his Third Symphony. It iscalled the Eroica, or heroic, symphony and waswritten on a grand scale. He dedicated the work toNapoleon. However, Beethoven, who supportedrepublican government, removed the dedication indisgust after the French leader made himself emper-or. Still, the piece reflects the great force of willthat Napoleon brought to politics.

    Beethoven produced many pieces, from pianomusic to string quartets to symphonies. His SixthSymphony, called the Pastoral, was the first of anew kind of work called program music. Thecomposition was meant to tell a story. For example,light-hearted sections might suggest a pleasant dayin the country, while darker, faster sounds mighthint at a summer storm.

    In his last 12 years, Beethoven hardly left hishome at all. Complete deafness overtook him, andhe could only communicate with friends by writingand reading notes. He wrote less music, but hisnew works were his most complex and moving yet.His crowning achievement was the Ninth Symphony,first performed in 1824. It combined an extra-largeorchestra and a chorus, which ends the work bysinging the stirring Ode to Joy, a call for the fellow-ship of all people. At the performance, Beethoventurned the pages of the score for the conductor,keeping time with his foot. Unable to hear, he wasunaware of the audiences enthusiastic applause.

    Questions1. Recognizing Main Ideas How did Beethoven

    suffer in his life?2. Making Inferences How did Beethovens work

    show the values of romanticism?3. Making Judgments In what ways was

    Beethoven an innovator? Explain.

    CHAPTER

    8

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    The World: Political

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    Africa:AlgeriaAngolaCameroonDem. Rep of CongoEgypt EthiopiaKenyaLiberiaLibyaMadagascarMoroccoMozambiqueNigeriaSierra LeoneSomaliaSouth AfricaSudanTunisia

    Europe:AustriaBelgiumCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkEnglandFinlandFranceGermanyGreeceIcelandIrelandItalyNetherlandsNorwayPoland PortugalRomaniaSpain SwedenSwitzerlandUkraine

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    The World: Political

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    Americas:ArgentinaBahamasBoliviaBrazilChileColombiaCosta RicaCubaDominican RepublicEl SalvadorGuatemalaHaitiHondurasJamaicaNicaraguaPanamaPeruPuerto RicoVenezuela

    Asia:Afghanistan ChinaIndiaIndonesiaIranIraqIsraelJapanKazakhstanKuwaitMongoliaNepalNew Guinea PoliticalNew ZealandNorth KoreaPakistanPhilippinesRussiaSaudi ArabiaSouth KoreaSri LankaSyriaTaiwanThailandTurkeyVietnamYemen

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