Carnival Gala in Venice - Save Venice Inc

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    Save Venice Inc

    Dedicated to preserving the artistic heritage of Venice

    Save Venice IncDirectors

    Jesse Robert Lovejoy Chairman

    Sarah Schulte President

    Mrs. Dennis C. Stanfill Vice President

    John R. Staelin Treasurer

    John Leopoldo Fiorilla Secretary

    Prof. David Rosand Project Director

    Randolph H. Guthrie, M.D.Chairman Emeritus

    Bernadette J. BergerLaura Maioglio Blobel

    Francesca Bortolotto PossatiProf. Patricia Fortini Brown

    Mrs. Hilary P. CalifanoTia Fuhrmann Chapman

    John W. DayAllison Hyde Drescher

    Robert E. DukeBeatrice Esteve

    Adelina Wong EttelsonJ. Winston Fowlkes III

    Donald T. FoxMary E. Frank

    Irina Tolstoy GansBeatrice H. Guthrie

    Anne HawleyFrederick Ilchman

    Dayssi Olarte de KanavosManfred KuhnertElizabeth Locke

    Mrs. Guido LorenzottiJohn LoringEmily Mead

    Mary Kathryn NavabRichard E. Oldenburg

    Juan M. PrietoProf. Theodore K. Rabb

    Beatrice Rossi-LandiJames B. Sherwood

    Sidney H. StiresJack Gumpert Wasserman

    George C. WhiteMatthew White

    Hutton WilkinsonBaroness Mariuccia Zerilli-

    Marim

    Elizabeth S. Makrauer Executive DirectorKaren L. Marshall

    Associate Director, New York & Assistant Treasurer

    Melissa Conn Associate Director, Venice

    Palladio at The MorganOn Wednesday, March 26, 2008, at The Morgan Library and Museum, Prof. Theodore K. Rabb presented A Most Agreeable Sight: The Legacy of Palladio. Celebrating the 500th anniversary of the birth of Andrea Palladio, Prof. Rabb offered a glimpse of both Palladios own age and his profoundly influential approach to architecture.

    Interns Assist Venice OfficeStudent interns generously donated time to assist in Save Venices Venice office in 2008.

    Summer: Ben Brown, Skidmore College; Jack Carter, Brunswick School; Ali Damico, Colgate University; Laura Blanco, Elaine Burchman, Andrew Greene, Kevin Jason, Columbia University Center for Study in Venice at Casa Muraro. Fall: Victoria Cubera, Nicki Finberg, Gi Young Lee, Michelle McLaughlin, Daniel Muniz, Emily Olsson, Rachel Wassel, George Zeitler, Colgate University.

    Newsletter 2008

    Save the Date Carnival Gala

    in VeniceFebruary 1114, 2010 (Presidents Day Weekend)

    Four days of unforgettable festivities in support of

    Save Venices restorations.

    15 East 74th StreetNew York, NY 10021

    Tel: 212-737-3141Fax: 212-249-0510

    San Marco 2888a30124 Venice, ItalyTel: 041 52-85-247Fax: 041 52-31-843

    newyork@savevenice.orgvenice@savevenice.orgwww.savevenice.org

    UNESCO-Private Committees for the Safeguarding of Venice.

    Visit our Web site, developed by The Media Center for Art History, Columbia University.

    Sponsored by The Hazen Polsky Foundation, Inc.

    Save Venice Inc., based in New York, has raised more than 20 million dollars to restore over 350 works of art and architecture in Venice. Every year, the Board of Save Venice, including a Projects Committee of renowned experts, selects restoration projects in col-laboration with the Venetian Superintendencies of Monuments, Fine Arts and Museums. Save Venice currently has 45 projects underway throughout the city, made possible with support from individuals, foundations, and chapters in Boston and California.

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    Save Venice would like to thank Michael LaPlaca and the staff of LaPlaca Cohen for their generosity in designing and producing this newsletter. Ar

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    San Sebastiano Restoration Campaign

    Conservation work is underway in the church of San Sebastiano, Save Venices current major project. The churchs three large ceiling can-vases, painted by Paolo Veronese in 1555 and dedicated to the Old Testament heroine Esther, were removed in early October from their position high above the churchs nave and transported to a restoration laboratory in Venice for conservation treat-ment. A scaffolding platform, installed in the church to allow the ceiling canvases to be dis-mantled, is now the base from which conservators will under-take the painstaking restora-tion of Veroneses painted and gilded wooden ceiling and mas-sive coffered frames that house the Esther series. The church remains open to the public dur-ing the conservation campaign, and despite the scaffolding, the majority of Veroneses pictorial decoration remains visible to visitors.

    Recent contributions to the on-going restoration campaign for San Sebastiano come from the California Chapter of Save Venice, from Friends in Honor of Mary and Howard Frank earmarked for the restoration

    of Veroneses Coronation of Esther canvas, from Elizabeth Locke through the sale of 35 limited edition Elizabeth Locke San Sebastiano pendants, and from Walter Mead.

    Paolo Veronese(15281588)San Sebastiano Dorsoduro

    The restoration of San Sebastiano is supported in part by Save Venice General Funds and generous gifts to the campaign from:California Chapter of

    Save VeniceThaw Charitable TrustFriends in Honor of Mary and

    Howard FrankElizabeth LockeWalter MeadBoston Chapter of Save VeniceIrina Tolstoy and John G. Gans

    Head of Scientific Committee:Giovanna Nepi Scir, Superintendent of Fine Arts and State Museums of Venice

    Project Director for ceiling canvases: Giulio Manieri Elia, Superintendency of Fine Arts and State Museums ofVeniceRestorer: Lucia Tito and the CBC restoration firm

    Project Director for painted wooden ceiling: Amalia Donatella Basso, Superintendency of Monuments of Venice

    Project Director for struc-tural verifications: Alberto Lionello, Superintendency of Monuments of Venice

    Above right: The removal of Corona-tion of Esther from the painted ceil-ing. Right: Art handlers lowering the wrapped canvas to the ground.

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    The Venetian church of San Sebastiano is a temple dedicated to the art of Paolo Veronese. Painting in a variety of techniques and surfaces, in oil on canvas and on wood and in fresco and tempera on plaster, his brush animated its ceilings and walls with historical narratives, iconic images, and decorative motifs of remarkable inventiveness.

    David Rosand, Save Venice Project Director and

    Meyer Schapiro Professor of Art History at

    Columbia University

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    This painting is thought to have originally decorated a fifteenth-century altar in the Gothic church of San Francesco della Vigna. When the church was enlarged and rebuilt by architect Jacopo Sansovino starting in 1534, the painting was adapted to fit a new Morosini family chapel and altar within Sansovinos Renaissance church.

    One striking hypothesis, recently advanced, is that the picture may have once been the center panel of a triptych, with the two lateral panels now being lost. This idea is supported by evidence revealed during conservation that the painting we see today was modified (possibly more than once and by a second artist) with skillfully painted additions to enlarge the background of the pictorial scene of the panel, whose original dimensions evidently were not ideal for the new chapel and marble altar Sansovino designed for the Morosini family between 1540 and 1552. Scholars consider that the words ordinis minorum, referring to the Franciscan Friars whose church this is, were also added on that occasion to the scroll in the paintings foreground, which con-tains the artists signature: Frater Antonius de Nigropon pinxit. In addition, a can-vas lunette of God the Father, attributed to Benedetto Diana or Francesco Bissoli, was placed above the painting, within the marble frame.

    Antonio Falier remains an enigmatic art-ist, and this is his only known painting. From his name we determine that he came from the Venetian colony of Negroponte

    near Greece, and that he was a man of the Church, hence his clerical title of Fra, standing for frate, or monk. He is thought to have collaborated artistically with Jacopo Bellini, as is evident from stylistic similarities as well as a document dated 1469 describing an attempt on Bellinis part to recover money owed to him by Fra Antonio.

    Fra Antonio Falier da Negroponte (second half 15th century)Madonna and Child Enthroned, 1460s (?) with modifications in the 1530s (?)San Francesco della Vigna

    Funded by Young Friends of Save Venice, Boston Chapter

    Project Director: Emanuela Zucchetta, Superintendency of Monuments of VeniceConservator: Andrea Libralesso

    Cover: Madonna and Child Enthroned by Fra Antonio Falier da Negroponte.

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  • Members of the Scuola dei Mercanti, a wealthy merchants guild, commissioned this canvas for their chapter hall, located adjacent to the church of Madonna dellOrto in Cannaregio. The Angel Gabriel and the Virgin are depicted against a theatrical architectural backdrop. The temple that appears in the background may have been inspired by the church of Santa Maria Nuova in Vicenza, completed by Andrea Palladio in 1578, the same date as this painting. Palladio was a familiar figure to the merchants guild as well, for they remodeled their premises in 1570 according to the great