Book Redesign Process Book

  • View
    224

  • Download
    5

Embed Size (px)

DESCRIPTION

Process book for book redesign project

Transcript

  • book redesignvisc 414: publication and editorial

    patrick dooley

    Breanne Fencl

  • research materials

  • project synopsis

    Redesign an illustrated book of your own choosing. You will design a cover, title page, table of contents, and 8 typical spreads including at least one chapter opening/divider spread, and 6 7 spreads with illustration(s). These spreads must have variety and as a group address all the fundamental problems of the publication. You must also design a special feature (e.g. time line for a history; maps for a travel book) not found in the original book and that grows out of your books subject matter, adding extra value to the book.

  • 2.21- Snow Day. Final pushed back to 2.27.

    2.26- Snow Day. Final pushed back to 3.5

    2.27- Final complete. Ready for printing and binidng.

    day to day notes1.22- Presented topic of ballet history book. Adding ballet dic-tionary for supplemental material.

    1.24- Brought in book analysis. Ballet dictionary terms will be their own seperate side bar. Add famous dancer bios?

    1.29- Brought in hand drawn mock-ups of grids and layouts. My group liked the square and landscape layouts the best. They seem to suggest more movement. Will use those for tomorrows computer mockups.

    1.31- Finalized color scheme. Found a great amount of images and text. Need to find more information for special feature (History of the Pointe Shoe). Going to go with square layout.

    2.5- Revised spreads. Brought in type and image palettes. Both are okay. Might need to revise grid. Too much margin at bot-tom. Use illustrations for definitions. Possibly other places?

    2.7- Revised spreads. Make definition own zone. Make it recognizable to the browser. Four swans cover got the best response. Consider different placement of title.

    2.12- Individual meet up day. Minor revisions needed. Back cover text needs to be shortened. Edit end sheets.

    2.14- Binding demonstration. Minor tweaks to spreads. Find papers. Matte would probably be best for subject matter.

    2.19- Black fabric for cover works. Need to figure out why cover is bowing in. Study pocket construction.

  • What is Wrong with the Design as it Currently is in Terms of AudienceThe books are a bit flat in design. The pages are laid out like a novel with full pages of text. In order to see a picture of what the author is describing, the reader has to flip to a separate sec-tion that holds the pictures. The pictures themselves lack order and are just randomly squeezed onto a page.

    General Approach to its RedesignMy approach to this book redesign will be to make it simpler and more engaging to read. It will be a book that is able to read cover to cover as well as accommodate a reader who just wants to browse. The main body of the text will be the history of bal-let itself, with sidebars of ballet terms and profiles of different topics. I will also incorporate photos and diagrams with the text to eliminate the constant flipping between text and photo pages.

    To Suggest:elegancegraceprecisionevolutionmovementdisciplinebalancepassion

    Definitions:evolution: any process of formation or growth; developmentelegance: a refinementprecision: accuracy; exactness

    analysisContentThe two books I chose were Apollos Angels: A History of Ballet and Technical Manual and Dictionary of Classical Ballet. The first explores the history of the dance form the 1500s to present day. It is beauti-fully written and is engaging. It has a storytelling approach to telling the history of ballet rather than a straight statement of facts and dates. The second book, a ballet dictionary accurately describes classical ballet steps and positions as well as provides diagrams. I chose these books because ballet is a topic that interests me and I have grown up with it. I have been dancing since I was three and ballet has always been a favorite of mine. The history and technique fascinate me. I also thought it would lend itself to a beautiful illustrated book.

    Text Partsheadspull quotescaptionsside barbody

    Illustrative Partsprimarydiagramdetailtexture

    AudienceThis book will be geared towards a 20-30 year old woman, who is somewhat experienced in ballet, and is interested in learning the history and technical language of the art form. They have a high school diploma and are in college pursuing a degree.

  • designdevelopment

  • arabesque[a-ra-BESK]

    A position of the body, in profile, supported on one eht htiw ,ilp-imed ro thgiarts eb nac hcihw ,gel

    other leg extended behind and at right angles to it, and the arms held in various harmonious positions.

    Angelsapollosa history of ballet

    jennifer homans

    I

    II

    france and the classical origins of balletchapter 1 Kings of Dance 3chapter 2 The Enlightenment and the Story of Ballet 49chapter 3 The French Revolution in Ballet 98chapter 4 The Rise of the Ballerina 135chapter 5 Scandinavain Orthodoxy: The Danish Style 176chapter 6 Italian Hersey: Pantomime, Virtuosity, and Italian Ballet 205

    chapter 7 Tzars of Dance: Imperial Russian Classicism 245chapter 8 East Goes West: Russian Modernism and Ballets Russes 290chapter 9 Left Behind? Communist Ballet from Stalin to Brezhnev 341chapter 10 Alone in Europe: The British Moment 396chapter 11 The American Century I: Russian Beginnings 448chapter 12 The American Century II: The New York Scene 470

    light from the east: russian worlds of art

    chapter 4

    dreamsof poets taken seriously.thophile gautierBallets are the

    She is birdlike, quaint, and almost cloy-ingly sweet, and if there is a thought in her head, it is lost in the mists of her vaporous ethereality. She is the pink-tights-and-toe-shoes ballerina of girlish dreams-and femi-nist nighhtmares. Yet Marie Taglioni was one of the most important and influential ballerinas who ever lived. She galvanized a generation and drew some of Europes best literary minds to dance; she was an interna-tional celebrity celebrityballets firstand set the pattern for Margot Fonteyn, Melissa Hayden, Galina Ulanova, and others to fol-low. More than that, she radically changed the art: La Sylphide laid the way for the toe-shoes-and-tutus ballet we know today.

    We feel we know Marie Taglioni. We know her from prints of La Sylphide, the Parisian ballet that made her famous in 1832: she is awispy, winged creature, a confection of white tulle and rose perched delicately on toe, torso tilted slightly forward as if she were listening to a faint song.

    Marie Taglioni was also known for shortening her skirt in the performance La Sylphide, which was considered highly scandalous at the time. She shortened all of her skirts to show off her excellent pointe work, which the long skirts hid.

    B aryshnikovBorn in Riga, Latvia, in 1948, Mikhail Baryshnikov owed his beginnings in ballet to his mother. She was poorly educated but adored ballet; she took him to performances and enrolled him in the prestigious Riga School of Choreography, the citys state ballet academy, where he received excellent training. When he was twelve, however, tragedy struck: one afternoon his mother left him with his grandmother and committed suicide. In 1964, when he was just sixteen, Baryshnikov traveled to Leningrad with the Latvian National Opera Ballet and successfully auditioned for the Va-ganova School. He was taken in by the teacher Alexander Pushkin, who had also kept and trained Nureyev. Pushkin became a mentor and surrogate father. Baryshnikov rose rapidly: he joined the Kirov in 1967 and became the scar of the companys 1970 tour to the West.

    In the early twentieth century all of this changed with the arrival of the Russians, the tsars Imperial dancers. Some came with Diaghilev; others followed in the wake of the First World War and the Russian Revolu-tion. Diaghilev booked his company into the Metropolitan Opera House, but most, including the renowned ballerina Anna Pav-lova, toured the vaudeville circuit. By then, vaudeville was a tightly organized syndicate of theaters and booking agents, run our of New York, Philadelphia, and Boston, and like her French and Italian predecessors, Pavlova the Incomparable appeared alongside minstrel shows, baseball-playing elephants, and other popular acts. If the theatrical fare tended toward the light, however, Pavlova and her audiences had no doubt about the seriousness of her art. Her natural charisma and ardent commitment left a powerful impression on an entire generation of American and European performers. She half hypnotized audiences, partaking almost of the nature of a divinity, the choreographer Agnes de Mille later recalled, my life was wholly altered by her. De Mille was not alone: when Pavlova died in 1931 scores of dreamy American girls reportedly fell spontaneously into astate of hysteria.

    shoe

    history of the 1832Marie Taglioni often gets the credit and the blame for being the first to dance on pointe. But no one really knows for sure. It is established that in 1832 Marie Taglioni danced in the full length La Sylphide on pointe.

    ribbonsSewn on by the dancer themselves, the ribbons aid in keeping the shoe on while contstantly changing between en pointe and flat foot.

    B

  • Angelsapollosa history of ballet

    jennifer homans I

    II

    france and the classical origins of balletchapter 1 Kings of Dance 3chapter 2 The Enlightenment and the Story of Ballet 49chapter 3 The French Revolution in Ballet 98chapter 4 The Rise of the Ballerina 135chapter 5 Scandinavain Orthodoxy: The Danish Style 176chapter 6 Italian Hersey: Pantomime, Virtuosity, and Italian Ballet 205

    chapter 7 Tzars of Dance: Imperial Russian Classicism 245chapter 8 East Goes West: Russian Modernism and Ballets Russes 290chapter 9 Left