Agenda What is “learner-centered”? ~Think of Time Activity ~ Learner-Centered: In Our Own Words Effective Instructional Strategies for the Learner- Centered

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Learning Outcomes Examine the beliefs underlying learner-centered instruction. Learn the defining characteristics of a learner- centered classroom. Learn effective instructional strategies for learner-centered classrooms.

Text of Agenda What is “learner-centered”? ~Think of Time Activity ~ Learner-Centered: In Our Own Words...

Agenda What is learner-centered? ~Think of Time Activity ~ Learner-Centered: In Our Own Words Effective Instructional Strategies for the Learner- Centered Classroom ~ Classroom community ~ Teaching to Learning Styles ~ Reinforcing Effort ~ Providing Recognition Learning Outcomes Examine the beliefs underlying learner-centered instruction. Learn the defining characteristics of a learner- centered classroom. Learn effective instructional strategies for learner-centered classrooms. Think of a Time Think of a time when you learned something quickly, easily and well learning that left a lasting impression on you. Where were you? Who were you with? How did it feel? What made it so memorable? Complete the Think of a Time web individually. Then share your web with others at your table. My Good Learning Experience Learning That Makes a Lasting Impression Interest in the concept to be learned. Skill or behavior is modeled Engaging hands-on and meaningful. Instructive feedback is given. Challenging instruction and content that makes you think. What is Learner-Centered? Learner-centered instruction places students at the center of decision making. When students are at the center of decision making everything is built around students needs. Students needs are the catalyst for any changes and new decisions. Adapted from: Schrenko, Linda. Structuring a Learner- Centered School. 1994 Learner Centered Target Content-Centered Target Bureaucracy-Centered Target Lunchroom-Centered Target Beliefs That Support Learner-Centered Instruction All children come to school willing and able to learn. Teachers enable learning by creating optimal conditions classroom environments and instructionthat is accepting of all children. Learning best occurs when individuals construct their own meaningthrough their personal experience, their experience with others, sharing experiences with others, and creating experiences collaboratively with others. Adapted from: Schrenko, Linda. Structuring a Learner-Centered School. 1994 Components of Learner-Centered Instruction Developmentally appropriate curriculum and instructional tasks. Authentic learning experiences. Cooperative learning structures. Mastery of materials and content. Reinforcing internal motivation. Performance assessments. Encouraging students responsibility for learning. Adapted from: Schrenko, Linda. Structuring a Learner-Centered School. 1994 Creating Learner-Centered Classrooms Engage students in activities that will help them learn about each other. Create home or base groups to provide students with a place to belong. Assign group roles that allow each student to demonstrate their learning strengths. Help students set realistic short-term academic and behavioral goals to focus on. Teach students how to reach their goals in small, doable steps and celebrate success one step at a time. Creating Learner-Centered Classrooms Recognize and celebrate students who try hard. Reward direction not perfection. Model the concept of learning from mistakes. Teach and practice rules and procedures. Develop rubrics and checklists to help students assess their own work and behavior. Involve the class as a team to work out challenges. Adapted from: Winebrenner, Susan. Teaching Kids with Learning difficulties in the Regular Classroom. 1996 Creating Classroom Community Students feel safe and valued as they are. Students are supported in maximizing their potential. Students feel a sense of connection to one another. Students understand the definition of fairness - every student getting what he or she needs to be successfulnot every student getting the same treatment. Learning Styles are the typical ways in which a person takes in and processes information, makes decisions and forms values. A persons learning styles is reflected in his or her behavior. Adapted from: ASCD. Teaching to Learning Styles Auditory Learners Remember what they hear and say Enjoy discussions Need to talk through new learning Are easily distracted by noise. Are often considered good students. Adapted from: ASCD. Teaching to Learning Styles Auditory Learners Need directions and important information presented verbally. opportunities to talk through their learning in their own words. opportunities to study aloud. . opportunities for group discussions. an area in the classroom for quiet work. Adapted from: ASCD. Teaching to Learning Styles Visual Learners Remember what they see. Put information into visual forms. Often write things down or draw pictures to help them understand and remember. Often need to see the big picture before they can see details. Adapted from: ASCD. Teaching to Learning Styles Visual Learners Need visual aids, graphic organizers, models and demonstrations. color highlighting of important information. important information and directions on charts. opportunities for visual practice. Adapted from: ASCD. Teaching to Learning Styles Tactile/Kinesthetic Learners Remember best when they do an experience. Need to have movement or touch incorporated into their instruction. Are often easily distracted or fidgety. Adapted from: ASCD. Teaching to Learning Styles Tactile/Kinesthetic Learners Need active strategies such as games, role-playing, experiments to introduce important concepts. appropriate movement activities including short breaks. opportunities to work with materials that require large muscle movement. Adapted from: ASCD. Teaching to Learning Styles Teaching to Learning Styles Intentionally deliver instruction in a variety of ways to meet diverse style needs. Provide opportunities for students to process their learning in ways that use their style strengths. Encourage students to show what they have learned in ways that use their diverse styles. Adapted from: ASCD. Teaching to Learning Styles Accepting Learning Differences Remember each student is an individual not a label. Gain insight and understanding into the unique ways our students learn. Teach to how students minds are wired for learning. Help students understand their learning strengths and special talents. Adapted from: Levine, Mel. Educational Care. 1994 Effort Effort is working until completion even when difficulties arise or a solution is not immediately evident. Difficulties are viewed as challenges that are opportunities to strengthen understanding and learn even more. Effort is the process to get to achievement. Adapted from: Marzano, Robert. Classroom Instruction that Works. 2001 Reinforcing Effort Students see a direct link between how hard they try at a particular task and their success at that task. Students see a direct relationship between how hard they work and how much they learn. Marzano, Robert. The Art and Science of Teaching Personal Reflection on Reinforcing Effort Think about a lesson that you taught this past week. Did you reinforce effort or only achievement? Now that you understand the importance of reinforcing effort, how might you incorporate that into your next lesson? Effective Recognition Specifies the particulars of the accomplishment. Provides information to the students about their competence or the value of their accomplishments. Is given in recognition of noteworthy effort or success at difficult tasks. Orients students toward better appreciation of their task-related behavior and problem- solving thinking. Uses students own prior accomplishments as the context for describing present accomplishments. Adapted from: Marzano, Robert. Classroom Instruction that Works. 2001