ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS o Rajiv Gandhi Grameen Vidyutikaran Yojana (RGGVY) 2005: Supports extension

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  • ProDoc: UNDP GEF Concentrated Solar Heating Project (India CSH) 1

    ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS

    APR Annual Project Review AWP Annual Work Plan BAU business-as-usual BEE Bureau of Energy Efficiency BIS Bureau of Indian Standards CBB Central Boilers Board CDM Clean Development Mechanism CII Confederation of Indian Industries CP Country Program CPAP Country Programme Action Plan CPC Compound Parabolic Concentrator CPRI Central Power Research Institute CSH Concentrated Solar Heating CSP Concentrator Solar Power CSTB Centre Scientifique et Technique du Bâtiment C-WET Center for Wind Energy Technology DEA Department of Economic Affairs DPR Detailed Project Report DST Department of Science and Technology EOI Expression of Interest EOP End of Project ERC Evaluation Resource Center (UNDP) ESCOs Energy Service Companies FACE Fund Authorisation and Certification of Expenditures Fraunhofer ISE Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems FSP Full Scale Proposal FYP Five Year Plan GBC Green Business Centre GEF Global Environment Facility GHG greenhouse gas GIZ Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ, formerly GTZ) GOI Government of India GW Giga Watt IEA International Energy Agency IIT Indian Institute of Technology IITB Indian Institute of Technology Bombay INR Indian rupee (currency of India) IREDA Indian Renewable Energy Development Agency ISO International Organization for Standardization ITW Institute for Thermodynamics and Thermal Engineering, University of Stuttgart,

    Germany JNNSM Jawaharlal Nehru National Solar Mission kgoe kg of oil equivalent kWth kilo Watt Thermal LFR Linear Fresnel Reflector M&E Monitoring and Evaluation MNRE Ministry of New & Renewable Energy MoEF Ministry of Environment and Forests Mt Million tonnes MTE Mid-Term Evaluation Mtoe Million ton of oil equivalent MW Megawatt NABARD National Bank for Agriculture and Development NAPCC National Action Plan on Climate Change NFTDC Non Ferrous Technology Development Centre NPC National Project Coordinator NPD National Project Director NPM National Project Manager OECD Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development

  • ProDoc: UNDP GEF Concentrated Solar Heating Project (India CSH) 2

    PAC Project Advisory Committee PCRA Petroleum Conservation Research Association PIF Project Identification Form PIR Project Implementation Reports PMU Project Management Unit PPG Project Preparatory Grant PPP Purchasing Power Parity PPR Project Progress Reports PSC Project Steering Committee PTC Parabolic Trough Concentrator QPR quarterly progress reports R&D Research and development RGGVY Rajiv Gandhi Grameen Vidyutikaran Yojana1

    RPO Renewable Purchase Obligation RTA Regional Technical Advisor (UNDP) SBAA Standard Basic Assistance Agreement SEC Solar Energy Centre SERC State Electricity Regulatory Commission SNA State Nodal Agency tCO2 tonne of carbon dioxide ToRs Terms of Reference UAC Unit Abatement Cost UNDAF UN Development Assistance Framework UNDP APRC UNDP Asia Pacific Regional Centre UNDP CO UNDP country office UNDP United Nations Development Programme UNFCCC UN Framework Convention on Climate Change USAID US Agency for International Development USD or US$ US Dollar

    1 RGGVY is Government of India’s programme for rural electrification.

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    TABLE OF CONTENTS

    PART A. SITUATION ANALYSIS........................................................................................................... 4

    1. CONTEXT AND GLOBAL SIGNIFICANCE: ENVIRONMENTAL, POLICY AND INSTITUTIONAL ...............................4 2. CONCENTRATED SOLAR HEAT FOR PROCESS APPLICATIONS AND BASELINE ANALYSIS............................. 9 3. BARRIER ANALYSIS ......................................................................................................................... 20 4. KEY STAKEHOLDERS .......................................................................................................................23

    PART B. PROJECT STRATEGY............................................................................................................ 27

    5. PROJECT RATIONALE, DESIGN PRINCIPLES AND STRATEGIC CONSIDERATIONS .............................27 6. POLICY CONFORMITY AND COUNTRY OWNERSHIP................................................................................28 7. PROJECT OBJECTIVES, OUTCOMES AND OUTPUTS ................................................................................28 8. KEY INDICATORS, RISKS AND ASSUMPTIONS .......................................................................................46 9. COST-EFFECTIVENESS; GEF INCREMENTAL REASONING........................................................................48 10. SUSTAINABILITY AND REPLICABILITY .................................................................................................. 49 11. PROJECT RESULTS FRAMEWORK.......................................................................................................51 12. TOTAL BUDGET AND WORK PLAN..................................................................................................... 62 13. MANAGEMENT ARRANGEMENTS ..................................................................................................... 71 14. MONITORING FRAMEWORK AND EVALUATION ................................................................................... 75 15. LEGAL CONTEXT............................................................................................................................78

    PART C. ANNEXES............................................................................................................................ 79

    ANNEX A. RISK ANALYSIS.......................................................................................................................79 ANNEX B. AGREEMENTS........................................................................................................................85 ANNEX C. TERMS OF REFERENCE .............................................................................................................. 88 ANNEX D. EMISSION REDUCTIONS CALCULATION.........................................................................................91 ANNEX E. SOLAR CONCENTRATOR TECHNOLOGIES ......................................................................................93 ANNEX F. SUMMARY OF 11 ENERGY AUDITS & 4 INDIAN CSH CASE STUDIES ............................................... 94 ANNEX G. LIST OF CSH INSTALLATIONS IN INDIA....................................................................................... 101 ANNEX H. SUMMARY REPORT ON STAKEHOLDERS CONSULTATIONS.............................................................. 105 ANNEX I. LIST OF CSH MANUFACTURERS ................................................................................................. 108 ANNEX J. LIST OF LEADING INTERNATIONAL GROUPS INVOLVED IN TESTING OF SOLAR CONCENTRATORS.............110 ANNEX K. SEQUENCE OF ACTIVITIES FOR DEMONSTRATION AND REPLICATION PROJECTS .................................. 111 ANNEX L. PROJECT ANNUAL TARGETS............................................................................................... 113

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    PART A. SITUATION ANALYSIS

    1. CONTEXT AND GLOBAL SIGNIFICANCE: ENVIRONMENTAL, POLICY AND INSTITUTIONAL

    India’s Energy Scenario

    1. India is currently the second fastest growing major economy and is the fourth largest in the world in purchasing power parity (PPP) terms, with steady progress achieved since the start of economic liberalisation reforms in 19912. The International Monetary Fund predicts 8.3 % growth for India for the year ending 31 March 20113. The Eleventh Five-Year Plan (2007-2012) predicts an energy demand of 547 Mtoe in 2011-12 and between 1,350-1,700 Mtoe by the year 2030. The per capita primary energy consumption in India in 20084 was about 540 kgoe/year, which is well below that of developed countries. While the country’s per capita energy consumption will remain much lower than that of industrialized countries for the foreseeable future, India’s total energy consumption is expected to continue to increase significantly for many decades as it continues to develop.

    2. The industrial sector is the second largest energy consuming sector in India after the residential sector. Industrial sector demand was 114.8 Mtoe of energy in 2008, which is 28% of the total energy demand of the country5. Growth in industrial energy demand is projected to grow at a rate of 4.7% per year during the period of 2005-2015. International Energy Agency (IEA) projections are that the industrial sector’s energy demand will increase to 34% of India’s total energy demand in 20306. Electricity is a relatively smaller constituent of industrial energy demand compared to other major economies; in 2008, only 21% of industrial energy demand was in the form of electricity (Figure 1). The rest of the demand was met by fuels – coal, biomass, oil products and gas, which indicate that a large amount of energy in the industrial sector is used to provide thermal energy/heat. Oil products accounted for 20% of total industrial demand.

    Figure 1: Indian Industrial Demand by Fuel Type, 2008

    Total Industrial Energy Consumption (2008) = 114.8 Mtoe [Source: IEA]

    3. Domestic production of crude oil in India has remained at similar l