18938184 Interior Design Visual Presentation

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INTERIOR DESIGN VISUAL PRESENTATION A Guide to Graphics, Models, and Presentation TechniquesSECOND EDITION

Maureen Mitton

JOHN WILEY & SONS, INC.

INTERIOR DESIGN VISUAL PRESENTATION A Guide to Graphics, Models, and Presentation TechniquesSECOND EDITION

Maureen Mitton

JOHN WILEY & SONS, INC.

This book is printed on acid-free paper. O

Copyright 2004 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved Published by John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, New Jersey Published simultaneously in Canada No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, scanning, or otherwise, except as permitted under Section 107 or 108 of the 1976 United States Copyright Act, without either the prior written permission of the Publisher, or authorization through payment of the appropriate per-copy fee to the Copyright Clearance Center, Inc., 222 Rosewood Drive, Danvers, MA 01923, (978) 750-8400, fax (978) 750-4470, or on the web at www.copyright.com. Requests to the Publisher for permission should be addressed to the Permissions Department, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 111 River Street, Hoboken, NJ 07030, (201) 748-6011, fax (201) 748-6008, e-mail: permcoordinator@wiley.com. Limit of Liability/Disclaimer of Warranty: While the publisher and author have used their best efforts in preparing this book, they make no representations or warranties with respect to the accuracy or completeness of the contents of this book and specically disclaim any implied warranties of merchantability or tness for a particular purpose. No warranty may be created or extended by sales representatives or written sales materials. The advice and strategies contained herein may not be suitable for your situation. You should consult with a professional where appropriate. Neither the publisher nor author shall be liable for any loss of prot or any other commercial damages, including but not limited to special, incidental, consequential, or other damages. For general information on our other products and services or for technical support, please contact our Customer Care Department within the United States at (800) 762-2974, outside the United States at (317) 572-3993 or fax (317) 572-4002. Wiley also publishes its books in a variety of electronic formats. Some content that appears in print may not be available in electronic books. For more information about Wiley products, visit our web site at www.wiley.com. Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data: Mitton, Maureen. Interior design visual presentation : a guide to graphics, models, andpresentation techniques / Maureen Mitton.-- 2nd ed. p. cm. ISBN 0-471-22552-5 1. Interior decoration rendering. 2. Interior decoration--Design. 3. Graphic arts. I. Title. NK2113.5.M58 2003 729'.028--dc21 2002156140 Printed in the United States of America 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

For Roger, Anna, and Luc

CONTENTSACKNOWLEDGMENTS INTRODUCTION ix 1 vii ORTHOGRAPHIC DRAWINGS

Introduction to Drawing 1 Materials, Tools, and Equipment 2 Understanding Orthographic Projection Drawings 5 Orthographic Projection Drawings for Interior Environments

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THE DESIGN PROCESS AND RELATED GRAPHICSIntroduction to the Design Process Programming 23 Schematic Design 26 Design Development 42 21

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PARALINE AND PERSPECTIVE DRAWINGSIntroduction to Three-Dimensional Views Paraline Drawings 45 Perspective Drawings 50 Developing Visual Skills 55 44

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DRAWING AND SKETCHING INTERIOR ENVIRONMENTSEstimated One-Point Interior Perspective Drawings Estimated Two-Point Interior Perspective Drawings Rened Linear Perspective Methods 75 Two-Point Plan Projection Method 75 Prepared Perspective Grid Charts 83 Perspectives Traced from Photographs 85 Computer-Generated Imagery 88 64 70

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RENDERING

9299

Introduction to Rendering 92 Materials, Media, and Tools 93 Rendering Orthographic Projection Drawings Rendering Perspective Drawings 106

COLOR PLATES SCALE MODELS

119 159

Introduction to Scale Models 159 Materials and Tools 160 Construction and Use of Models 171

PRESENTING MATERIALS AND FINISHESIntroduction to Materials Presentations 181 Materials and Media 183 Organization and Composition 186 Techniques and Methods of Presentation 191

181

PORTFOLIOS AND RESUMESGraphic Design Components The Resume 202 The Portfolio 220 The Digital Portfolio 222APPENDIX ONE

199

199

DIRECTORY OF PROFESSIONALS FEATUREDAPPENDIX TWO

227 228

DRAWING ELEVATIONS: A RESIDENTIAL CASE STUDYAPPENDIX THREE

COLOR THEORY FOR RENDERINGAPPENDIX FOUR

230 231

SCALE FIGURES AND ENTOURAGEAPPENDIX FIVE

TWO-POINT PERSPECTIVE GRIDAPPENDIX SIX

234

FLOOR PLANS OF PROFESSIONAL CASE STUDY: SCIENCE MUSEUM OF MINNESOTA 235 INDEX 236

ACKNOWLEDGMENTSThis book, just like the rst edition, compiles the work of many hands (and keyboards) and conversations. It has been made possible by the generous contributions of numerous people, to whom I would like to express my gratitude. First, I must acknowledge my current and former students, who have taught me volumes and who continue give me the energy to keep going. I must thank all of the former students who contributed work to the rst edition especially, including Theresa Isaacson, Leanne Larson, Ardella Pieper, Cory Sherman, and Justin Thomson. Denise Haertl, Dan Effenheim, Anne (Cleary) Olsen, and Angela Ska, now professional designers, all willingly handed over portfolios for inclusion in this edition. Current students who contributed work and help include Kristy Bokelman, Anne Harmer, and Randi Steinbrecher. And I thank former exchange students Elke Kalvelage, Jessica Tebbe, and Dirk Olbrich for allowing me to include some of their ne work. I have been amazed and touched by the generosity of members of the design community who shared time and contributed projects: my friend Lynn Barnhouse at Meyer, Scherer & Rockcastle Architects, who contributed a great deal of work and gave hours of her time; Jane Rademacher, Lisa Miller, and Bob Albachten; and Thom Lasley, of RSP Architects. Others who took time out of very busy schedules to contribute include Thomas Oliphant; Jim Smart, of Smart Associates; Jim Moeller, at Arthur Shuster Inc.; Craig Beddow, of Beddow Design; Deborah Kucera, of TKDA; Janet Lawson, of Janet Lawson Architectural Illustration; and Robert Lownes, of Design Visualizations; Harris Birkeland; and Aj Dumas. I must acknowledge and thank my colleagues at the University of WisconsinStout. Courtney Nystuen, a wonderful teacher and architect, contributed in many ways. Bill Wikrent, who is talented, knowledgeable, and very generous, deserves special thanks. And this edition would not have been nished in this decade without the gift of a sabbatical: thank you to the Sabbatical Committee. Jack Zellner and Kristine Recker Simpson deserve thanks for willingly contributing their ne work. This project would not have been possible without the help of my husband, Roger Parenteau, support from our daughter, Anna, and a fair amount of terror generated by young Luc to keep things interesting.

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INTRODUCTIONThe practice of interior design is complex and continues to evolve. Technological and societal changes fueled by the industrial revolution and continued by more recent advancements in technology have shaped the profession in decisive ways. In a world that requires increasing professional specialization, interior design has gained recognition as an independent discipline. Work done by groundbreaking interior designers in the twentieth century has enhanced the built environment and increased the visibility of the profession. The development of educational standards, professional organizations, a qualifying exam, and legislative certication has increased the quality and credibility of practitioners and fostered design excellence. The design of interior environments requires specialized methods of presentation, which are often omitted in standard architecture texts. This book identies methods used in the visual presentation of interior spaces and articulates them in written and visual language. Various phases of the design process are discussed in order to reveal the connection between process and presentation. Some often overlooked basic principles of graphic design and portfolio design are also discussed. Intended as a primer on interior design visual communication, this book presents a range of styles and techniques. The goal is to provide students and practitioners with information on visual presentation techniques and a variety of methods and materials. It is important to note that this book is not intended to impart ways of camouflaging poorly conceived design work with tricky techniques. This is not a rendering book; it is instead a portfolio of methods of communication. Good design requires, and deserves, adequate and appropriate presentation. My desire to write the rst edition of this book grew from an ongoing pedagogical need: to show students a range of examples of presentation techniques and styles. Often design students look for the right way to create a presentation, and this is a mistake because there are many ways of creating successful presentations. Interior design education has suffered from a lack of documentation of the many possible modes of presentation and a lack of specialized information for students. I have found that students exposed to a variety of methods and specic examples create appropriate and useful presentations, whereas students left uninformed about the possibilities often repeat the same lackluster or inappropriate type of presentation project after project.

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