Bpg arc flash

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Bpg arc flash

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  • THE BEST PRACTICE GUIDE TO: Arc Flash Labeling A Graphic Products Library Resource 877.534.5157 | DuraLabel.com | GraphicProducts.com
  • 877.534.5157 Informazioni: info@rebosytems.it Web: www.rebosystems.it
  • ARC FLASH LABELING The following pages help explain how to label your facility for arc ash hazard safety and compliance. The goal is to ensure arc ash labeling provides maximum safety for workers, emergency responders, and others who must enter your facility. The standards described come from a combination of NFPA 70E-2012, IEEE 1584-2002 and ANSI Z535-2011 standards. We encourage readers to research these standards for further information. TOOLS ......................................................................................................................pg 1 Learn what labeling tools are required for arc ash labeling and about other tools that will aid in compliance. DEFINITIONS...................................................................................................... pg 3 Learn what an arc ash is and what potential hazards it may pose to employees and bystanders. What is an Arc Flash? Denitions of Terms EVALUATION - FACILITY INSPECTION ....................................... pg 5 Find out what needs to be evaluated in a facility. Elements of an Inspection Qualifying Electrical Equipment 23 pg LABEL CREATION ........................................................................................... pg 7 Why is it important to know what an arc ash is? Learn what is required on labels, when to use a Danger label instead of a Warning label, and how to print arc ash labels. Signal Word Usage Required Information Arc Flash Label Elements Canadian Arc Flash Labeling Understanding Arc Flash PPE Necessary Equipment and Supplies Label Creation Steps LABEL PLACEMENT .................................................................................. pg 12 Proper placement of arc ash labels will increase worker safety and improve overall workow. Placement of Labels Removing Old Labels LABEL MAINTENANCE ............................................................................ pg 13 Learn how to extend the life of arc ash labels. TAGOUT............................................................................................................... pg 15 Procedures for proper arc ash tagout. pg 7 When should a DANGER label be used? When should a WARNING label be used? ARC FLASH INFORMATION GUIDE ................................................. pg 16 A brief overview of the data that is required on arc ash labels for NFPA 70E compliance. The information presented in this document was obtained from sources that we deem reliable; Graphic Products, Inc. has made every effort to ensure this information is correct. However, we do not guarantee accuracy or completeness. Graphic Products, Inc. makes no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied. Information in this document is subject to change without notice. Graphic Products, Inc. disclaims liability for injury, damages, or loss of any kind arising from the use of this document whether in contract, tort, under statute, or otherwise. No reliance should be placed on information contained in, implied by or inferred from this document. Users of this document should consult municipal, state, and federal code and/or verify all information with the appropriate regulatory agency.
  • TOOLS The recommended tools and equipment involved with Arc Flash labeling projects include: Technical or safety information regarding equipment to be labeled Computer with Windows 2000 or newer For mobile printing use DuraLabel Toro, or a laptop or DuraLabel MPS 150 XL with a DuraLabel PRO Series printer and battery Word processing software or DuraSuite Software (included free with DuraLabel desktop printers) DuraLabel symbol and template library DuraLabel desktop printer (visit DuraLabel.com for a complete list of label printers) DuraLabel arc ash labeling supplies (many label sizes available) Die-cut preprinted DANGER header labels (up to 8.8" x 12.8") Die-cut preprinted WARNING header labels (up to 8.8" x 12.8") Die-cut preprinted CAUTION header labels (up to 8.8" x 12.8") Optional language preprinted header supplies in Spanish or French: Die-cut preprinted PELIGRO header labels (up to 8.8" x 12.8") Die-cut preprinted ADVERTENCIA header labels (up to 8.8" x 12.8") Die-cut preprinted AVERTISSEMENT header labels (up to 8.8" x 12.8") Two-color striped vinyl (up to 9" tall) DuraLabel premium thermal transfer ribbon Supplies and equipment to clean/prepare surfaces for labeling Putty knife or razor blade Isopropyl alcohol Graphic Products is one of the few to provide NFPA 70E-2012 compliant software with DuraLabel desktop printers. 1 877.534.5157 Informazioni: info@rebosytems.it Web: www.rebosystems.it DuraLabel.com
  • Printing arc ash labels with the DuraLabel PRO 300 is a huge time saver and a real joy over the way we used to do it. MICHAEL, Electrical Engineer, Engineering Design Firm DuraLabel PRO 300 Safety Label & Sign System m From energy to aerospace, from military to transportation, thousands of sportation, facilities trust DuraLabel for safety labels and signs. igns. Increase efciency, improve safety, maintain compliance, and save money money mpliance, n with DuraLabel. Property Tags Pipe Markers IIAR Pipe Markers SAVE RTK Labels with the Arc Flash DUO Kit print on 1/2" to 9" tape widths with this kit Lean Manufacturing & 5S Labels Facility Labels Tag Labels Cable Markers Call to nd out how you can get a DuraLabel PRO 300 & DuraLabel 9000 at an incredible discounted price! 877.534.5157 | DuraLabel.com Informazioni: info@rebosytems.it Web: www.rebosystems.it Waynding
  • DEFINITIONS To know the risks, its helpful to know the language. Here are some widely used terms used in communicating arc ash hazards. What is an Arc Flash? An arc ash is a rapid, explosive discharge of electrical energy that usually results from a short circuit fault. Metal vaporized by the 5,000+ degree temperatures of an arc ash produces a high-temperature plasma. A shockwave blast can propel metal shrapnel at high velocities in many directions. An arc ash can occur in very little time. Explosions have been known to occur in as little as 1/1000 of a second. The event is unexpected, violent, and deadly. The potential for injury can be reduced using various electrical safety tools and techniques. Remote breaker racking, remote door opening and closing, and wearing the proper personal protective equipment (PPE) all offer improved safety. A key element in any arc ash safety program is good visual communication. Using labels and signs to warn workers, emergency responders, and others of a potential arc ash hazard is critical safety information and saves lives. Ensure your facility follows the latest standards to provide maximum safety around equipment and other electrical hazards. 3 877.534.5157 Informazioni: info@rebosytems.it Web: www.rebosystems.it DuraLabel.com
  • DEFINITIONS Denitions of Terms (from NFPA 70E, 2012 Edition) The following terms are frequently found on arc ash labels and signs. Nominal System Voltage (NSV): The NSV is normally the voltage required by the largest loads in a system. Common industrial values are 120, 208, 220, and 480 volts. This measurement can be VAC or VDC and required by 2012 NFPA 70E (130.5(C)) to be displayed on arc ash labeling. Arc Flash Boundary: The arc ash boundary is the distance at which a person is likely to receive a second degree burn if an arc ash were to occur. The onset of a second degree burn is possible when the skin receives 1.2 cal/cm2 of incident energy. (Calculations based on 2012 NFPA 70E Annex D.7.5.) This measurement is required by 2012 NFPA 70E (130.5(C)) to be displayed on arc ash labeling. Available Incident Energy at a Working Distance: This is the energy per unit area on a surface located at the normal working distance from the potential arc fault. The incident energy is most commonly measured in units of calories per square centimeter. Second degree burns occur at an energy level of approximately 1.2 cal/cm2. Required Level of PPE: The Personal Protective Equipment required is dependent on the incident energy at every point a person may perform work on energized equipment. An electrical engineer or other qualied person should cover all parts of the body that may be exposed to an arc ash. This could include boots, gloves, ameresistant clothing, safety glasses, etc. Hazard Risk Category (HRC): A general classication of hazard involved in performing specied tasks. HRC typically ranges from zero to four, with zero denoting minimum-risk activities and four denoting high-risk activities. NFPA provides a recommended list of PPE for each HRC in Table 130.7. HRC levels are not associated with a specic measurement of cal/cm2 by NFPA, but rather a dened list of PPE. Shock Protection Boundary (Not Required): Limited Approach Boundary (Annex C.1.1 and C.1.2.2) This boundary may only be crossed by a qualied person. An unqualied person, wearing appropriate PPE may cross if accompanied by a qualied person. Becoming qualied requires special training. Restricted Approach Boundary (Annex C.1.2.3) This boundary may only be crossed by a qualied person that has a documented plan approved by authorized management and uses adequate shock prevention equipment and techniques. Prohibited Approach Boundary (Annex C.1.2.4) This boundary may only be crossed by a qualied person that has the same level of protection required for direct contact with live parts. Arc Flash Boundary Limited Approach Boundary Limited Space Restricted Approach Boundary Restricted Space Any point on an exposed, energized electrical conductor or circuit part Prohibited Space Prohibited Approach Boundary Limits of approach (NFPA 70E-2012) As the dist