Msl landing

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<ul><li>1.Press Kit/JULY 2012Mars Science Laboratory Landing</li></ul><p>2. Media ContactsDwayne Brown NASAs Mars 202-358-1726Steve ColeProgram 202-358-0918Headquarters dwayne.c.brown@nasa.govWashington stephen.e.cole@nasa.govGuy Webster Mars Science Laboratory 818-354-5011D.C. Agle Mission818-393-9011Jet Propulsion Laboratoryguy.webster@jpl.nasa.govPasadena, Calif.agle@jpl.nasa.govScience Payload InvestigationsAlpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer: Ruth Ann Chicoine, Canadian Space Agency, Saint-Hubert, Qubec,Canada; 450-926-4451; ruthann.chicoine@asc-csa.gc.caChemistry and Camera: James Rickman, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, N.M.; 505-665-9203;elvis@lanl.govChemistry and Mineralogy: Rachel Hoover, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, Calif.; 650-604-0643;rachel.hoover@nasa.govDynamic Albedo of Neutrons: Igor Mitrofanov, Space Research Institute, Moscow, Russia;011-7-495-333-3489; imitrofa@space.ruMars Descent Imager, Mars Hand Lens Imager, Mast Camera: Michael Ravine, Malin Space ScienceSystems, San Diego; 858-552-2650 extension 591; ravine@msss.comRadiation Assessment Detector: Donald Hassler, Southwest Research Institute; Boulder, Colo.;303-546-0683; hassler@boulder.swri.eduRover Environmental Monitoring Station: Luis Cuesta, Centro de Astrobiologa, Madrid, Spain;011-34-620-265557; cuestacl@cab.inta-csic.esSample Analysis at Mars: Nancy Neal Jones, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.;301-286-0039; nancy.n.jones@nasa.govEngineering InvestigationMSL Entry, Descent and Landing Instrument Suite: Kathy Barnstorff, NASA Langley Research Center,Hampton, Va.; 757-864-9886; kathy.barnstorff@nasa.gov 3. ContentsMedia Services Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5Quick Facts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6Mars at a Glance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7Mars Science Laboratory Investigations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8Mission Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25Comparing Two Mars Rover Projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34Spacecraft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35Curiositys Landing Site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46Recent, Current and Upcoming Missions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50Mars Science: A Story of Changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54Historical Mars Missions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59Program and Project Management. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61 4. Media Services InformationNASA Television TransmissionPropulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., will present in-formation about the missions science goals and capa-NASA Television is available in continental North bilities at 10 a.m. PDT, and about the flight and plannedAmerica, Alaska and Hawaii by C-band signal via landing at 11 a.m. Pre-landing update briefings at JPLSatellite AMC-18C, at 105 degrees west longitude, are scheduled for 9:30 a.m. PDT on Aug. 4 and 9:30transponder 3C, 3760 MHz, vertical polarization. Aa.m. on Aug. 5. A post-launch briefing at JPL will beginDigital Video Broadcast-compliant Integrated Receiver within about an hour of the anticipated landing timeDecoder is needed for reception. Transmission format(10:31 p.m. PDT) under most conditions, and withinis DVB-S, 4:2:0. Data rate is 38.80 Mbps; symbol rate about three hours of the landing time if the spacecrafts28.0681, modulation QPSK/DVB-S, FEC 3/4.status is unknown. All of these briefings will be carriedon NASA TV and on http://www.ustream.tv/nasajpl.NASA-TV Multichannel Broadcast includes: Public Specific information about upcoming briefings, as theyChannel (Channel 101) in high definition; Education are scheduled, will be kept current on the Internet atChannel (Channel 102) in standard definition; and Media http://www.nasa.gov/msl.Channel (Channel 103) in high definition.Live FeedFor digital downlink information for each NASA TV chan-nel, access to all three channels online, and a scheduleTwo live feeds of video during key landing activitiesof programming for Mars Science Laboratory activities,from mission control rooms at JPL will be carried onvisit http://www.nasa.gov/ntv.NASA TV and on http://www.ustream.tv between 8:30and 11:00 p.m. PDT on Aug. 5 (11:30 p.m. Aug. 5 toMedia Credentialing 2:00 a.m. Aug. 6 EDT), and between 12:30 and1:30 a.m. PDT on Aug. 6 (3:30 to 4:30 a.m. EDT).News media representatives who would like to coverThe NASA TV Public Channel and http://www.ustream.the launch in person must be accredited through the tv/nasajpl will carry a feed including commentary andNASA Jet Propulsion Laboratorys Media Relationsinterviews. The NASA TV Media Channel and http://Office. To apply for credentials, visit http://media- www.ustream.tv/nasajpl2 will carry an uninterrupted,credentials.jpl.nasa.gov. Specific questions about theclean feed.credentialing process may be submitted to media-credentials@list.jpl.nasa.gov. Journalists may con- Internet Informationtact the JPL newsroom at 818-354-5011 for moreinformation.Information about NASAs Mars Science Laboratorymission, including an electronic copy of this press kit,News Conferencespress releases, status reports and images, is availableat http://www.nasa.gov/mars and http://marsprogram.An overview of the mission will be presented in a newsjpl.nasa.gov/msl. Frequent updates about the mission,conference broadcast on NASA TV and on http://www.together with public feedback, are available by follow-ustream.tv/nasajpl, originating from NASA Headquartersing Curiosity on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/in Washington, at 1 p.m. EDT on July 16, 2012. Back-marscuriosity and on Facebook at http://www.to-back briefings on Aug. 2, 2012, at NASAs Jetfacebook.com/marscuriosity.Mars Science Laboratory Landing 5Press Kit 5. Quick FactsSpacecraftMissionCruise vehicle dimensions (cruise stage and aeroshell Time of Mars landing: 10:31 p.m. Aug. 5 PDT (1:31with rover and descent stage inside): Diameter: 14 feet,a.m. Aug. 6 EDT, 05:31 Aug. 6 Universal Time) plus or9 inches (4.5 meters); height: 9 feet, 8 inches (3 meters)minus a minute. This is Earth-received time, which in-cludes one-way light time for radio signal to reach EarthRover name: Curiosity from Mars. The landing will be at about 3 p.m. localRover dimensions: Length: 9 feet, 10 inches (3.0 meters)time at the Mars landing site.(not counting arm); width: 9 feet, 1 inch (2.8 meters); Landing site: 4.6 degrees south latitude, 137.4 degreesheight at top of mast: 7 feet (2.1 meters); arm length: east longitude, near base of Mount Sharp inside Gale7feet (2.1 meters); wheel diameter: 20 inches (0.5 Cratermeter)EarthMars distance on landing day: 154 million milesMass: 8,463 pounds (3,893 kilograms) total at launch, (248 million kilometers)consisting of 1,982-pound (899-kilogram) rover;5,293-pound (2,401-kilogram) entry, descent and land- One-way radio transit time, Mars to Earth, on landinging system (aeroshell plus fueled descent stage); and day: 13.8 minutes1,188-pound (539-kilogram) fueled cruise stageTotal distance of travel, Earth to Mars: About 352 millionPower for rover: Multi-mission radioisotope thermoelec- miles (567 million kilometers)tric generator and lithium-ion batteriesPrimary mission: One Martian year (98 weeks)Science payload: 165 pounds (75 kilograms) in 10 in-struments: Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer, Chemistry Expected near-surface atmospheric temperatures atand Camera, Chemistry and Mineralogy, Dynamic landing site during primary mission: minus 130 F to 32Albedo of Neutrons, Mars Descent Imager, Mars HandF (minus 90 C to zero C)Lens Imager, Mast Camera, Radiation AssessmentProgramDetector, Rover Environmental Monitoring Station, andSample Analysis at Mars Cost: $2.5 billion, including $1.8 billlion for spacecraftLaunchdevelopment and science investigationsand additionalamounts for launch and operations.Launch Time and Place: Nov. 26, 2011, 10:02 a.m.EST, from Launch Complex 41, Cape Canaveral AirForce Station, Fla.Launch Vehicle: Atlas V 541 provided by United LaunchAllianceEarthMars distance at launch: 127 million miles(204 million kilometers)Mars Science Laboratory Landing 6Press Kit 6. Mars at a GlanceGeneral Environment One of five planets known to ancients; Mars was Atmosphere composed chiefly of carbon dioxide the Roman god of war, agriculture and the state (95.3 percent), nitrogen (2.7 percent) and argon Yellowish brown to reddish color; occasionally the(1.6 percent) third-brightest object in the night sky after the moon Surface atmospheric pressure less than 1/100th and Venus that of Earths average Surface winds of 0 to about 20 miles per hour (0 toPhysical Characteristics about 9 meters per second), with gusts of about 90 miles per hour (about 40 meters per second) Average diameter 4,212 miles (6,780 kilometers); Local, regional and global dust storms; also whirl- about half the size of Earth, but twice the size of winds called dust devils Earths moon Surface temperature averages minus 64 F (minus Same land area as Earth, reminiscent of a cold, 53 C); varies from minus 199 F (minus 128 C) rocky desertduring polar night to 80 F (27 C) at equator during Mass 1/10th of Earths; gravity only 38 percent asmidday at closest point in orbit to sun strong as Earths Density 3.9 times greater than water (compared withFeatures Earths 5.5 times greater than water) No planet-wide magnetic field detected; only local- Highest point is Olympus Mons, a huge shield vol- ized ancient remnant fields in various regionscano about 16 miles (26 kilometers) high and 370 miles (600 kilometers) across; has about the same area as ArizonaOrbit Canyon system of Valles Marineris is largest and Fourth planet from the sun, the next beyond Earth deepest known in solar system; extends more than 2,500 miles (4,000 kilometers) and has 3 to 6 miles About 1.5 times farther from the sun than Earth is(5 to 10 kilometers) relief from floors to tops of sur- Orbit elliptical; distance from sun varies from a mini- rounding plateaus mum of 128.4 million miles (206.7 million kilometers) to a maximum of 154.8 million miles (249.2 million Moons kilometers); average is 141.5 million miles (227.7 million kilometers) Two irregularly shaped moons, each only a few Revolves around sun once every 687 Earth days kilometers wide Rotation period (length of day): 24 hours, 39 min- Larger moon named Phobos (fear); smaller is utes, 35 seconds (1.027 Earth days) Deimos (terror), named for attributes personified Poles tilted 25 degrees, creating seasons similar toin Greek mythology as sons of the god of war EarthsMars Science Laboratory Landing 7 Press Kit 7. Mars Science Laboratory InvestigationsMars Science Laboratory Investigations croorganisms or their fossil equivalents. However, if this mission finds that the field site in Gale Crater has hadNASAs Mars Science Laboratory mission will studyconditions favorable for habitability and for preservingwhether the Gale Crater area of Mars has evidence of evidence about life, those findings can shape futurepast and present habitable environments. These studies missions that would bring samples back to Earth forwill be part of a broader examination of past and presentlife-detection tests or for missions that carry advancedprocesses in the Martian atmosphere and on its surface.life-detection experiments to Mars. In this sense, theThe research will use 10 instrument-based scienceMars Science Laboratory is the prospecting stage in ainvestigations. The missions rover, Curiosity, carries thestep-by-step program of exploration, reconnaissance,instruments for these investigations and will support theirprospecting and mining evidence for a definitive an-use by providing overland mobility, sample-acquisition swer about whether life has existed on Mars. NASAscapabilities, power and communications. The primaryAstrobiology Program has aided in development of themission will last one Mars year (98 weeks).Mars Science Laboratory science payload and in stud- ies of extreme habitats on Earth that can help in under-The payload includes mast-mounted instruments to standing possible habitats on Mars.survey the surroundings and assess potential samplingtargets from a distance; instruments on CuriositysThree conditions considered crucial for habitability arerobotic arm for close-up inspections; laboratory instru- liquid water, other chemical ingredients utilized by lifements inside the rover for analysis of samples fromand a source of energy. The Mars Science Laboratoryrocks, soils and atmosphere; and instruments to moni-mission advances the follow the water strategy oftor the environment around the rover. In addition to the NASA Mars exploration since the mid-1990s to ascience payload, engineering sensors on the heat shieldstrategy of determining the best settings for seeking anwill gather information about Mars atmosphere and the answer to whether Mars ever supported life.spacecrafts performance during its descent through theatmosphere.Every environment on Earth where there is liquid water sustains microbial life. For most of Earths history, theTo make best use of the rovers science capabilities, aonly life forms on this planet were microorganisms, ordiverse international team of scientists and engineers willmicrobes. Microbes still make up most of the living mat-make daily decisions about the rovers activities for theter on Earth. Scientists who specialize in the search forfollowing day. Even if all the rovers technology performs life on other worlds expect that any life on Mars, if it hasflawlessly, some types of evidence the mission will seek existed at all, has been microbial.about past environments may not have persisted in therock record. While the possibility that life might haveCuriosity will land in a region where this key item on theexisted on Mars provokes great interest, a finding thatchecklist of lifes requirements has already been deter-conditions did not favor life would also pay off with valu-mined: It was wet. Observations from Mars orbit duringable insight about differences and similarities betweenfive years of assessing candidate landing sites haveearly Mars and early Earth.made these areas some of the most intensely stu...</p>