Creating presentations that don't suck

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    21-Jan-2015

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This talks gives some basic pointers on how to give power point presentations that are effective and get your point across. Great for young scientists, or really any academic field.

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  • 1. Creating presentations that don’t suck Melissa Haendel PMCB Retreat 09-20-13 Is this a good color scheme?
2. Hello! Melissa Haendel • Assistant Professor, DMICE and OHSU Library • • • •BA, Chemistry, Reed College PhD, Neuroscience, University of Wisconsin I build informatics tools for biologists I like to garden and pick wild mushrooms 3. Hello! Melissa Haendel • Assistant Professor, DMICE and OHSU Library • • • •BA, Chemistry, Reed College PhD, Neuroscience, University of Wisconsin I build informatics tools for biologists I like to garden and pick wild mushroomsIrrelevant information! Introduce yourself as is relevant to the presentation 4. Start your presentations with: What is the premise of your story? The problem space you are trying to address? The crux of your biscuit?Telling a good scientific story is important to be a successful scientist 5. Your slides don’t tell a storyYou do. Use your slides as prompts for your story, don’t rely on them to do the job. 6. Key considerations:Text Color Graphics Pace Attribution 7. keep your text to a minimum 8. Chilean Fruit Exports ••• •Fresh fruit leads Chile's export mix - Chile emerges as major supplier of fresh fruit to world market due to ample natural resources, consumer demand for fresh fruit during winter season in U.S. and Europe, and incentives in agricultural policies of Chilean government, encouraging trend toward diversification of exports and development of nontraditional crops - U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Economic Research Service Report Chile is among the developing economies taking advantage of these trends, pursuing a free market economy. This has allowed for diversification through the expansion of fruit production for export, especially to the U.S. and Western Europe. Chile has successfully diversified its agricultural sector to the extent that it is now a major fruit exporting nation. Many countries view Chile's diversification of agriculture as a model to be followed. Meanwhile, the U.S. remains the largest single market for Chile's fruit exports. However, increasing demand from the EC and Central and East European countries combined may eventually surpass exports to the U.S., spurring further growth in Chile's exports. If you’ve read this far, your eyes probably hurt and you’ve been reading this tedious longwinded text instead of listening to me. I’m insulted- can’t you see I’m doing a presentation up here? Look at me! Congratulations, however, on having such good eyesight.No one will read this , and neither will you. In fact, you wont’ remember what it says. 9. Slide text should only be enough to help you remember your story     Don’t use large blocks of text Emphasize the main points The “Six-by-Six” rule Use pictures Use a large font…at least 30-point or more for most text 10. Lists and Bullets • Don’t use bullet points for a single bullet – Don’t complicate bullets with many indentations This can confuse your audience  Don’t mix bullet styles throughout the talk 11. ABOUT THEMES AND LAYOUTS  Just because Powerpoint/Keynote has neatothemes doesn’t mean you should use them  You can create your own background  Not all slides have to be the same  Fill the space, but don’t crowd the space  Use white background when images have whitebackground 12. Querying across anatomical granularity 13. Querying across anatomical granularity 14. Use CONTRAST 15. Dark BackgroundLight Background 16. High Contrastlow Contrast 17. Don’t do this! • My personal favorite: the Suzuki Savage • Light weight (~380lbs) • Adequate power (650cc engine) • Low seat height fits most riders 18. Bad Color Choices  Avoid loud, garish colors…dark text on light background or vice versa is best.  Avoid text colors that fade into background, i.e. blue and black  Avoid color-blind combinations: – Red and green – Blue and yellow 19. Photo: Andrew Bain 20. Image Is Everything 21. Everything you need to say is in the picture – little text is needed 22. We want to understand gene function across taxaVertebrata tetrapod limbsAscidians ampullaeEchinodermata tube feetArthropoda Annelida parapodia MolluscaSticky-outy bits express distalless – deep homology? CJ Mungall, C Torniai, GV Gkoutos, SE Lewis, MA Haendel. Genome biology 13 (1), R5 23. Overwhelming Pictures  Use pictures, but don’t let them use you  Keep slides SIMPLE! Too much diverts audience away from content  Too many pictures make saving difficult 24. Figure evolution 1 25. Figure evolution 2 26. Final Figure 27. Resolution Matters 28. 72 dpi… 29. 300 dpi… 30. Graphs & Charts 31. Bad VISUALIZATION 32. Animation http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Transi_10.png 33. Racquetball Fundamentals • • • •2, 3, or 4 players. 1 player serves, other “returns.” Only serving player can score. Served ball must land past serving line and cannot hit back wall. • Ball can only bounce once before striking front wall…but ball does not have to bounce. 34. Using too much Slide Animation  Again, keep slides simple!  Apply one Slide Transition style and one animation scheme to ALL slides  Busy presentations divert audience attention from content. 35. Murphy’s Law  Something WILL go wrong - test your presentation  Always have a backup of your presentation  Be prepared to do the presentation without the slides 36. Presentation tips  Talk to your audience, not the slides  Don’t read what is on the slides…  Avoid apologizing for a presentation shortcomings  Know how to pronounce words in your talk  Check spelling  Don’t put things in slides you aren’t going to talk about and then say you don’t have time to talk about them 37. Presentation Pacing  Don’t make too many slides Avoid the slide rush at the end of your talk  Each slide takes 1-3 minutes average  A 10 minute talk should have about 6 slides Look at your audience and adjust pace Leave time for Q & A 38. Attribution  Where your images/quotes came from  The people/animals you care abouthttp://commons.wikimedia.org/ 39. Ontologies built for one species will not work for othershttp://ccm.ucdavis.edu/bcancercd/22/mouse_figure.htmlFree image sites: mediawikicommonshttp://fme.biostr.washington.edu:8080/FME/index.html 40. Sharing your slides  Slideshare for sharing – Can reference in CV  Attribute slides reused from Slidesharehttp://www.slideshare.net/ 41. Be a good audience too  Are you annoyed when your audience is chatting? Texting?  Ask questions  Make eye contactGiving a talk is a two-way conversation 42. Practice Practice Practice Practice Practice Practice Practice Practice Practice Practice Practice Practice Practice Practice Practice Practice Practice Practice Practice Practice Practice Practice Practice Practice Practice Practice Practice Practice Practice Practice Practice Practice Practice Practice Practice Practice Practice Practice Practice Practice Practice PracticeDon’t practice until you get it right...Practice until you can’t get it wrong. - Your mother 43. Feeling the love?http://www.whatsthatbug.com/2008/07/05/mating-boxelder-bugs/Thanks to Jackie Wirz and Nicole Vasilvesky