Clive Wright

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  1. 1. Aviation: Competition and Co operationAviation: Competition and Co-operation Briefing to RAF Air Power Conference July 2015 Briefing to RAF Air Power Conference July 2015 Moving Britain Ahead
  2. 2. The aviation industry is critical to the UK, both as an industry in its own right, and supporting wider business activity Overview of the industry wider business activity industry Third largest aviation network in the world after US and China Direct air links to 98 countries and a further 79 countries with one stop en route The aviation sector (aerospace) contributes at least 16 billion per year to the UK economy (GVA) plus more indirectly. [Source: ONS] Around 230,000 people are directly employed by the aviation sector, with many more employed indirectly. [Source: ONS] G d h 100b hi d b h UK d EU i 40% f hGoods worth over 100bn are shipped between the UK and non-EU countries - over 40% of the UKs extra-EU trade by value. [Source: HMRC] Inward tourism by air makes up three quarters of foreign visitor holiday spending, with all visitsg y p g, by air directly contributing over 17.5bn to the UK economy [Source: ONS] Tax revenues from the aviation sector are 8.7bn per year [Source: Oxford Economics, based on corporation tax, income tax on employees and APD] July 15 2
  3. 3. EU28 North Other Europe A iAmerica Asia 507 64209 50 11 35 72 9 41 43 10 42 Africa Latin America & Caribbean 19 4 26 Flights to the UK (thousands per year) 8 2 19 19 4 26 Passengers flying to the UK (millions per year) Number of destinations with a direct weekly service to the UK The UK has a direct service at least weekly to over 370 international airports in around 100 countries Around 8% of inbound international passengers come from airports in Africa and the middle east the regions that concern Around 8% of inbound international passengers come from airports in Africa and the middle east, the regions that concern us more. Over 73% of inbound international passengers come from European airports. 20 July 2015 3
  4. 4. As an international business, Aviation is subject to global European and domestic rules Who does what? global, European and domestic rules The International Civil Aviation organisation of which the UK is aThe International Civil Aviation organisation, of which the UK is a Council Member, sets global standards for safety, security and environmental issues. The EU is preparing a package on aviation for consultation this autumn which will include competition issues The Europeanautumn, which will include competition issues. The European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) sets standards for safety across the European single aviation market, and its role is also up for review The reform of air navigation services across the EU isreview. The reform of air navigation services across the EU is taking place through the ECs Single European Sky initiative. The UK Civil Aviation Authority (a statutory corporation like the BBC) regulates other safetycorporation like the BBC) regulates other safety functions and is also the security, passenger rights, airspace and competition regulator July 15 4
  5. 5. CONTEST 4 PsCONTEST 4 P s PREVENT terrorism by tackling its underlying causes To reduce the PURSUE terrorists and those that sponsor them threat PROTECT the public and UK interests To reduce the risk the public and UK interests PREPARE To reduce vulnerabilityPREPARE for the consequences y Moving Britain Ahead
  6. 6. Terrorism Risk Mitigation 1. JTAC modal threat assessments1. JTAC modal threat assessments 2. DFT/CAA responsible for (i) risk assessment and (ii) tti d i t i i f t ti it 2. DFT/CAA responsible for (i) risk assessment and (ii) tti d i t i i f t ti it(ii) setting and maintaining programmes of protective security requirements and guidance (ii) setting and maintaining programmes of protective security requirements and guidance 3. INDUSTRY directed to undertake security measures3. INDUSTRY directed to undertake security measures 4. CAA test, monitor and enforce compliance4. CAA test, monitor and enforce compliance 5. DfT/CAA Incident response5. DfT/CAA Incident response Moving Britain Ahead
  7. 7. Aviation security is a continuing priority with key judgements for Ministers across Government about the The security challenge balance between risk management and business impact Aviation security is a significant part of Aviation security is a significant part of the regulatory landscape facing airlines and airports and one where we work in close partnership with Home Office andp p National Security Council It is always difficult to get the right balance between managing risk and keeping the passenger experience positive At the moment, we are growing our bilit t th i k i icapability to manage the risk arising from flights coming into the UK, while ensuring that regulation on outbound flights is effective and proportionateflights is effective and proportionate The Counter-Terrorism and Security Act 2015 strengthened the Secretary of States powers to direct foreign carriers to undertake specified security measures as a condition of flying into UK airspace. July 15 7
  8. 8. A i ti S it OAviation Security Overseas We can impose security standards at UK airports, and protect our citizens on flights leaving the UK. But when they fly back, or anywhere else in the world, they depend on the security regime overseas rs overseas. We have some of the highest security standards in the world. The US has robust security standards too, and the EU baseline urity-BriefingfornewMinister y standards are being updated to address the latest threats. But we have concerns about security in a number of countries that are easily accessible from conflict zones from where terrorists may operate. AviationSecu p The Counter-Terrorism and Security Act 2015 strengthened the Governments powers to direct foreign carriers to undertake specified security measures as a condition of flying into UK airspace. uly201520Ju 8
  9. 9. Assurance We are expanding our network of aviation security liaison officers They work with overseas airports Our work with other countries liaison officers . They work with overseas airports, airlines and governments to raise security standards, as well as providing important information for us on security weaknesses. Some of them are based overseas Since 2011, DfT has delivered: 75Aviation Security training courses; in overseas. O C it D l t some 30different countries; to more than 1,600security staff. Overseas Capacity Development We also provide assistance to other states where we see vulnerabilities they are otherwise unable to dd d h th i ht t UK iti t i kaddress, and where these might put UK citizens at risk; This work (c1m per annum) is funded through successful bids to the Foreign and Commonwealth Offi C T i b d Africa 2014: Levant 2014: Gulf 2014: training Office Counter Terrorism budget. Support is mostly in the form of training, but can include equipment, consultancy and hosting inward visits. Africa 2014: counter-Portable Missile (ManPADS) training Levant 2014: training for security staff in Explosive Trace Detection Gulf 2014: training on implementing enhanced screening measures 9
  10. 10. Moving Britain Ahead
  11. 11. O fl i fli t h t d i ? The loss of MH17 over Ukraine focused the worlds Overflying conflict zones what are we doing? attention on the risks from anti-aircraft weaponry. For many years the Government has been idi d i t UK i b t i k fproviding advice to UK carriers about risks of overflying conflict areas, where we have relevant information to pass on. Since MH17 there has been a cross-government effort to gather all the relevant i f ti th t h ldinformation that we hold. There were many nationalities among the dead from MH17 including Britons So briefing only UKfrom MH17, including Britons. So briefing only UK carriers will not protect those Britons on other flights. The UK led a push at international level to share information on the risk of overflying conflict zones with all carriers Where the details cannot bezones with all carriers. Where the details cannot be given, at least we would make known that we had issued a warning. The UK was recently the first country to make its warnings available for all airlines and states to see on an ICAO-hosted global website. 20 July 2015 11
  12. 12. Ai P C f C ti d C titiAir Power Conference: Co-operation and Competition Certain air corridors narrowing. No overflights of Libya (a rare formal direction to UK carriers). Strong advice to avoid Syrian airspace. Caution below 25,000 feet AGL in South Sudan, Northern Sinai, Yemen, Iraq and elsewhere. Flights to e.g. India are largely forced down across Turkey then Iran; Regional instability squeezing UK carriers. Tunisia the latest (and saddest) example. Egypt no stranger to terrorist incidents targeting foreign tourists (Luxor, Taba bus bomb) but have recovered and are trying to hold the line; f f Turkey sits alongside a fractious neighbourhood, trying to balance numerous priorities, from Kurdish political aspirations domestically to its military prowess in Syria and Iraq; from ISIS-inspired terrorist attacks to handling hundreds of thousands of displaced and refugees from Syria. And all the while hoping to boost tourism levels;tourism levels; Over 400 flights a month link the UK and Turkey, with 12 carriers operating out of 8 Turkish airports, handling the vast bulk of almost 2.5 million British tourists per year; In Egypt at the height of the season some 180 flights will take off each week to the UK from four regional In Egypt at the height of the season, some 180 flights will take off each week to the UK from four regional airports, plus Cairo UK carriers and other civil airlines compete head-on with the military in certain countries, where a joint military-civil airfield will suddenly close for a military-r