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<p>HAYLING ISLAND GROUP</p> <p>HAYLING ISLAND GROUP - GENERAL ELECTION TOP 20 QUESTIONS</p> <p>Day 1 Answers to the first four questions:1.Without national security, we are unprotected from those who would do harm to our nation and its interests. Do you undertake to fight for spending on defence to be maintained at 2% of GDP, as an absolute bare minimum? If not, how do you think we can deal with the multiple threats of Islamic fundamentalism, a re-awakening bear in Russia, and a Russian backed threat to the Falklands from Argentina? Surely, we cannot rely entirely upon the US taxpayer for our national security?2.National issues aside, what specific local issues do you intend to concentrate on that will benefit the people of Havant and Hayling?3.In the light of a recent report that, when imports are considered, UK CO2 emissions are actually rising: is it worth damaging the UK economy with environmental regulations and controls on CO2 emissions, when the result is simply to export the emissions, and work, to countries such as China, where regulations are often much more lax?4.There is much talk about protecting the NHS from privatisation but, surely, the main NHS principle is that treatment is free at the point of use and irrespective of the means of the patient. Given that nobody is seriously questioning the free treatment principle, do you believe that public sector service provision is inherently better and more efficient than private sector provision, or is there a place for the private sector to provide some services within or on behalf of the NHS?</p> <p>Alan MakConservative Party</p> <p>1. Without national security, we are unprotected from those who would do harm to our nation and its interests. Do you undertake to fight for spending on defence to be maintained at 2% of GDP, as an absolute bare minimum? If not, how do you think we can deal with the multiple threats of Islamic fundamentalism, a re-awakening bear in Russia, and a Russian backed threat to the Falklands from Argentina? Surely, we cannot rely entirely upon the US taxpayer for our national security?</p> <p>NATO recommends that its members spend 2% of GDP on defence. We currently meet that target. We have a 34 billion defence budget, which is the fifth largest in the world, the second largest in NATO and the biggest in the EU. We certainly have the best Armed Forces in the world. We will have a review of defence spending (and indeed all other types of spending) after Mays general election spending reviews usually take place after elections. I very much hope we can continue to meet the NATO target.In the meantime, because we fixing the economy, we are able to commit, in the next parliament (2015-2020) to renewing our Trident nuclear deterrent and protect the size of our regular Armed Forces; and invest 163bn over the next 10 years to providing our Armed Forces with the latest equipment and technology, including 2 new aircraft carriers. </p> <p>2. National issues aside, what specific local issues do you intend to concentrate on that will benefit the people of Havant and Hayling?</p> <p>My 3 local priorities are: </p> <p>Strong Economy: Hayling residents deserve a secure and prosperous future, and a strong local economy is key. I want to help deliver more jobs, rising living standards and inward investment. As a shopkeepers son, I will back our small shops and businesses in areas like Mengham, West Town and Eastoke, and encourage businesses to locate to places like Sparkes Marina which would be perfect for online-businesses or light industry. We need more all-year-round jobs to complement our successful, seasonal visitor economy. I will also support the continued success of our sailing, watersports and coastal tourism sector. Successful Schools: Every young person on Hayling deserves the best start in life, and every resident of all ages needs the skills to compete and succeed in an increasingly competitive economy. So, I will work with Colin Rainford and his staff at Hayling College to boost attainment, and support our infant &amp; junior schools Mengham and Mill Rythe, using my experience as a long-serving primary school governor. I will also encourage life-long learning, including promotion adult education courses at places like South Downs and Havant College.Vibrant Communities: Hayling has a strong identity, excellent community spirit, and diversity (from the tranquillity of Northney to the hustle and bustle of the Seafront and Mengham). I want to protect and enhance this. Hayling also has a wide range of community groups, sports clubs and churches. Having met many of these groups, I am keen to support their continued growth and success, for example, helping them win funding or promote themselves locally. I will also support efforts to re-start the Hayling Ferry, and promote cycling working with Cycle Hayling.3. In the light of a recent report that, when imports are considered, UK CO2 emissions are actually rising: is it worth damaging the UK economy with environmental regulations and controls on CO2 emissions, when the result is simply to export the emissions, and work, to countries such as China, where regulations are often much more lax?</p> <p>No we shouldnt dampen our own economic growth or burden our business and industry with green taxes whilst other countries carry on polluting. We need to encourage a reduction in carbon emissions on a global, or at least regional, scale. </p> <p>4. There is much talk about protecting the NHS from privatisation but, surely, the main NHS principle is that treatment is free at the point of use and irrespective of the means of the patient. Given that nobody is seriously questioning the free treatment principle, do you believe that public sector service provision is inherently better and more efficient than private sector provision, or is there a place for the private sector to provide some services within or on behalf of the NHS?</p> <p>The NHS should be free at the point of use, and care should be provided on the basis of need not ability to pay. Conservatives have increased NHS funding by 12.9 billion since 2010 and we will protect and ring-fence NHS investment after May 2015 to secure the NHS future. We will also ask surgeries to open at evenings and weekends. Keeping the NHS in public hands is the best way to continue the public service ethos of the NHS. There is a place for private sector involvement the NHS, for example medicines are made by private pharmaceutical companies, whilst Macmillan nurses, hospices and charities etc. are all non-public groups that work in and with the NHS. Dental and doctors practices are often arranged as private businesses (usually partnerships) which are paid by the NHS to see NHS patients (and also paid by private patients when they go private). </p> <p>Tim DawesGreen Party</p> <p>PF PowerPoint Presentations</p> <p>1. Without national security, we are unprotected from those who would do harm to our nation and its interests. Do you undertake to fight for spending on defence to be maintained at 2% of GDP, as an absolute bare minimum? If not, how do you think we can deal with the multiple threats of Islamic fundamentalism, a re-awakening bear in Russia, and a Russian backed threat to the Falklands from Argentina? Surely, we cannot rely entirely upon the US taxpayer for our national security?</p> <p>No. We need to guarantee our security by a number of things, including a modern and flexible armed forces that is well-equipped and trained, But in general the kind of armed forces we need is changing. We should wait the results of the strategic defence review, but my feeling is that as a proportion of overall income the defence budget may well be below 2% of GDP and, given that enables us to spend more on other important public services like education and the NHS, I am relaxed about that. 2. National issues aside, what specific local issues do you intend to concentrate on that will benefit the people of Havant and Hayling? </p> <p>Let's talk specifically about Hayling. I want to see better public transport links including a properly managed Hayling Ferry service and a bus service that runs later into the evenings. I also believe that both local residents and visitors would benefit considerably from more investment in cycling facilities, including a hard surface north/south route across the island. Greens have long campaigned for a more community centred NHS and whilst we recognise that blue-light emergency and other specialist treatment services are best concentrated at QA, I feel that Hayling needs a local community NHS service that provides for minor injuries, walk-in treatment and out-patient services. Ideally this should be integrated with a GP practice. I am concerned about the closure of local police stations and would prefer to see a dedicated police service point on the island. I don't think the Library is the best place for that. I am also mindful that the reduction in local police presence and patrols is causing concern and will be discussing this issue with the Police Federation representatives this week. On tourism, we would like to see a more imaginative and active approach taken by Havant Council, building on and complementing the growing success of local businesses and those involved in water sports locally. We'd also like to see improved landing and storage facilities for local fishers. On conservation, more attention paid to conserving the natural areas on the island, especially the wilder portions of our coastal areas. Hayling does not need any large supermarket development or any large scale housing developments. I would look sympathetically on limited number of new small scale housing developments within existing build up areas, but use my influence to support those opposing any encroachment on playing-fields or green field areas. There are some simple and cheap things that could be done to encourage better greener energy use. One obvious one is the provision of two or three public charging places in HBC car parks for electric vehicles. This would also encourage eco-tourism. </p> <p>3. In the light of a recent report that, when imports are considered, UK CO2 emissions are actually rising: is it worth damaging the UK economy with environmental regulations and controls on CO2 emissions, when the result is simply to export the emissions, and work, to countries such as China, where regulations are often much more lax?</p> <p>The question is so deliberately loaded I hesitate to answer it, but simply put unless we reduce our CO2 emissions then Hayling, maximum height above sea level 5 metres, is doomed to sink beneath the waves. Of course by exporting our manufacture we have made our figures look better, though they are going up now in any event, mainly due to the increase in coal burning, but that strategy is wrong in so many ways. Unless we get back to making things ourselves and growing more of our own food, then in long term Britain will loose out. By the way, China is actually making significant strides in renewable energy and already produces a bigger percentage of its power from renewables sources than does Britain. </p> <p>4. There is much talk about protecting the NHS from privatisation but, surely, the main NHS principle is that treatment is free at the point of use and irrespective of the means of the patient. Given that nobody is seriously questioning the free treatment principle, do you believe that public sector service provision is inherently better and more efficient than private sector provision, or is there a place for the private sector to provide some services within or on behalf of the NHS?</p> <p>Oh, I disagree. People are questioning the free treatment principle, they may think its unpopular to talk about it before an election, but they are privately considering such options as treatment charging and health insurance schemes. Certainly the leader and many inside UKIP have done so and the BMA has specifically warned about the danger of it losing the free at point of service principle only this week. Dentistry, may I remind you, is not charged under the NHS a departure from the principle that led Bevan, the NHS's founding father, to resign from the Labour government of the day. It's not just privatisation that is wrong with the NHS; it's an over-reliance on top down organisation and the ridiculous idea that market principles can be applied to a caring service. People don't become doctors and nurses to be told they need to compete with their fellows in the hospital or NHS area down the road. Removing the internal market nonsense from the NHS would save around 5billion every year. </p> <p>Dr Graham GilesLabour Party</p> <p>1. Without national security, we are unprotected from those who would do harm to our nation and its interests. Do you undertake to fight for spending on defence to be maintained at 2% of GDP, as an absolute bare minimum? If not, how do you think we can deal with the multiple threats of Islamic fundamentalism, a re-awakening bear in Russia, and a Russian backed threat to the Falklands from Argentina? Surely, we cannot rely entirely upon the US taxpayer for our national security?</p> <p>With the volatile world we find ourselves in - stronger conventional armed forces are essential, backed up by an independent nuclear deterrent. Britain still has a leading international role to prevent military mass-destruction. 2% of GDP for all NATO members is the minimum insurance policy if diplomacy fails. The UK cannot afford to weaken its defences or its pre-emptive capacity in a world of known obligations and less predictable threats.Theres no question of us changing our position on Trident we support renewal and renewed focus on multilateral disarmament. Labours priority is to see strong high-tech Armed forces equipped for the challenges of the 21st Century with the skills and ability to tackle emerging, interconnected threats. Our decision in office to commission the two most advanced aircraft carriers in the world demonstrates more than anything else our commitment never to compromise Britains national security and ability to punch above our weight whatever, wherever and whenever the challenge.</p> <p>2. National issues aside, what specific local issues do you intend to concentrate on that will benefit the people of Havant and Hayling?In Parliament I will champion affordable geothermal power for Havant and Hayling Island families and businesses through European green energy grants (as Labour MP Alan Whitehead did in Southampton). This zero-carbon sustainable energy resource is drawn from the hot aquifer located 1000 metres below the Island and Havant. It is environmentally friendly, requiring no fracking, no injection of toxic chemicals and no re-drilling. The only discharge into the atmosphere is water vapour! Unlike wind and solar energy, geothermal heat and power is permanently available. Low cost green energy would be the single most attractive key to incoming investment and e...</p>