Wellbeing and safeguarding 23.10.15

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  • EV681/2 PGCE Primary

    Safeguarding and Wellbeing

    Friday 23rd October, 2015

  • Teachers Standards

    . . . establish a safe and stimulating environment for pupils, rooted in mutual respect

    . . . maintain good relationships with pupils, exercise appropriate authority, and act decisively when necessary

    . . . having regard for the need to safeguard pupils well-being, in accordance with statutory provisions

  • Every Child Matters (2003): five outcomes be healthystay safeenjoy and achievemake a positive contributionachieve economic well-being

    *

  • Who is involved?childcare settingsschools and collegeshealth servicessocial careyouth servicesthe police and criminal justice systemthe voluntary and community sectorcultural, sports and play organisations

    *

  • Original focus for inter-professional practicesSafeguarding children and young peopleSupporting health and wellbeingResponding to barriers to achievingSupporting children and young people in transitionProviding things to do and places to go toProviding information, advice and guidance

  • Continued focus for inter-professional workingSafeguardingVulnerable familiesSpecialist, targeted and early intervention provisionEducation, health and social care planningChildrens centres, extended schools, hospitals and community settings

    Change of government, changing policy and changing shape of services:

  • https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/419604/What_to_do_if_you_re_worried_a_child_is_being_abused.pdfhttps://www.gov.uk/government/publications/working-together-to-safeguard-children--2https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/447595/KCSIE_July_2015.pdf

  • Sharing concerns suspend disbelief, believe the unbelievable, imagine the unimaginable and dont think what if I am wrong but think what if I am right? (Waterhouse 2000 in Veale 2014; p 288)

    must be alert to any issues of concern in the childs Life at home or elsewhere

    (EYFS welfare requirements DfE 2014; p16)

  • How are you feeling today?Im feeling happy!How do you know you feel happy?How would someone else know?

  • Measuring Happiness (Ofsted 2012)

    What makes you happy?being safe;being well looked after;being treated with respect and fairness;being able to make own decisions;stability, andmoney can make you happy but not genuinely make you happy

    children in care*

  • "Health is a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity.

    http://www.who.int/en/

  • What is this thing called wellbeing?An indicator of the child doing well emotionally; feeling comfortable with themself

    Feeling at home; comfortable with oneself; like a fish in water

    Sense of wellbeing - what are the signs?Def. from NIHCE 2012Emot. wellbeing = being happy, confident; not anxious or depressedPsychological wellbeing = ability to be autonomous, problem solve, manage emotions, experience empathy, resilience attentiveSocial wellbeing = has good relationships with others, does not have behav. probs. disruptive, bully, violent

    Important in own right but basis for a healthy life.*

  • Wellbeing is a social construct and represents a shifting set of meanings wellbeing is no less than what a group or groups of people collectively agree makes a good life.(Ereaut and Whiting, 2008, p1)

    Agreed definition needed and if you wish to use a measure for enquiry need to be clear which definitions and indicators you are using.*

  • Leuven (2005) signalsEnjoymentRelaxed Vitality

    OpennessSelf-confidenceBeing in touch with self

    Watch two clips and look for signs THEN look at what Laevers says (editor, 2005)Handout

    pretend play the dancing class*

  • A scale for wellbeing and involvement Extremely lowLowModerateHighExtremely high

    See handout *

  • Childrens society Good childhood report 2015Relationships are at the heart of children's well being (p14)

    Low subjective well-being may be a precursor to other issues and problems in peoples lives such as poor mental health. (2014:p4)

    https://www.childrenssociety.org.uk/sites/default/files/TheGoodChildhoodReport2015.pdf

  • DemographicsKey findingsAgeA gradual decline in overall subjective well-being between the ages of eight and 14GenderSlight tendency (not always in evidence) for girls to have lower overall subjective well-being than boys, although gender differences are often nonsignificant when taking other factors into accountDisability Disability Disabled children have significantly lower than average subjective well-beingEthnicityLittle conclusive evidence of variation, although children in some minority ethnic groups may have slightly higher subjective well-being overall and in some domains than white childrenContextual factorsAccommodation typeChildren not living with family have significantly and substantially lower than average subjective well-beingEventsBeing bulliedChildren with recent experiences of being bullied have significantly and substantially lower than average subjective well-being. The effect of this factor is greater than the effect of all demographic factors combined

  • Childrens Society http://www.childrenssociety.org.uk/Anti-Bullying Week is November 16th-20th 2015Anti-Bullying Alliance http://www.anti-bullyingalliance.org.ukBullying UK http://www.bullying.co.uk/NSPCC http://www.nspcc.org.uk/Childline http://www.childline.org.ukKidscape https://www.kidscape.org.uk/The Diana Award http://www.antibullyingpro.com/

    The Good Childhood Report 2015, published by the Childrens Society, provides the latest picture of childrens subjective well-being, including the impact of bullying

    Anti-Bullying Week is organised by the Anti-Bullying Alliance

    (Taken from the government website) By law, all state (not private) schools must have a behaviour policy in place that includes measures to prevent all forms of bullying among pupils. This policy is decided by the school. (https://www.gov.uk/bullying-at-school/the-law)

    All other websites have plenty of resources and advice for professionals*

  • In the UK it is estimated that ten per cent of under-18s have a mental health problem that is severe enough to interfere with their day-to-day life, and half of these will have a clinical diagnosis of a mental health disorder (http://www.boingboing.org.uk/)

    Place2Be: http://www.place2be.org.uk/

    Young Minds: http://www.youngminds.org.uk/

    Boing Boing: http://www.boingboing.org.uk/

    CAMHS:http://www.nhs.uk/nhsengland/aboutnhsservices/mental-health-services-explained/pages/about-childrens-mental-health-services.aspx

    Place2Be provides emotional and therapeutic services in primary and secondary schools, building children's resilience through talking, creative work and play. Place2Be works with 257 primary and secondary schools, reaching a school population of 105,000 children, helping them to cope with wide-ranging and often complex social issues including bullying, bereavement, domestic violence, family breakdown, neglect and trauma. Locally, there are 4 Place2Be schools in the Hastings area (3 primaries, 1 secondary)

    YoungMinds is the UKs leading charity committed to improving the emotional wellbeing and mental health of children and young people. Website informative on mental health issues, as well as info on Academic Resilience

    Boing Boing Angie Hart (Uni of Bton) looks at resilience specfically. They say We were curious to know why some children facing similar difficulties and ongoing social disadvantage did better than others. The website gives info on resilience as well as resource info

    Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) provide specialist NHS mental healthServices. It is a multidisciplinary service, that is it includes a range of child mental healthprofessionals such as child psychiatrists, child psychotherapists, family therapists,childrens psychiatric nurses) and therapists such as art therapists. Referral normally through a GP.*

  • What does this all mean in the classroom?Validating childrens emotions; being a role modelEncourage all children to communicate and discuss how they feelUse stories, drama, role play and puppets to develop understanding and empathyPrioritise opportunities to promote secure attachments/relationshipsTake into account cultural perspectives on emotionsRefer to supportive materials, e.g. SEAL/SEAD Listen and look

    Gender issues here and nature: nurture tensionStereotyping boys with in ability or reluctance in expressing emotions accentuated in generally slower language development *

  • Kutnick, P. - Two pedagogic worlds:

    trustEmotionalVocabulary Problem solving

    1.Supporting peer-peer relationsWorking with others http://www.workingwithothers.org

  • School mechanismsPolicies: anti-bullying, safeguarding..Routines playtime, lunchtimes Culture and ethos of school and class

  • Good Teacher-Pupil Relationships Teachers should maintain good relationships with pupils(Standard 7 behaviour -DfE, 2011 p.7)

    How do we gauge this professional distance?The difference between being a friend and a professional.*

  • The teacher is of vital importance because the teacher will have an impact, through their emotional responses, on the childs regulatory abilities.McLaughlin, 2008.Good Teacher-Pupil Relationships The most frequently encountered non-family, positive role models in the lives of resilient children were favourite teachers who took a personal interest in them Howard et al. (1999, p. 313)

    The implications for pedagogy and child teacher relationships are profound,since engagement in learning, students achievements and supportive relationshipswith teachers are centre stage in developing emotional well-being. Developing an ethic of care would be a priority. Teachers as the caring other equate to the pedagogy of relationships.

    *

  • Bruce Johnson (2008) Teacherstudent relationships which promote resilienceBeing availableShowing an interestListeningTeaching the basicsBeing positiveInterveningBeing human-connecting

    Australian longitudinal study begun in 1997 and completed in 2005 bound up with the continuous acts of meaning making that teachers and students engage in throughout the school day.

    Being available/showing an interest -She is a really special person to me because even though Im not in her class she invites me over sometimes to do plays.As soon as I walk in the door and she says, Hello it just makes me happy. ListenTheyre really nice people and they listen to most people when theyve got problems and they help them out Contrast teachers who dont listen My maths teacher, I hate her. She doesnt listen to you. She just doesnt listen to you

    Being positive My teacher is important because hes the one that urges me on to do stuff. He says comeon Christopher, you can do it, just think positive, and if it wasnt for him I couldnt have done all of this that I have.

    Teach the basicsThey help me with my work and they help me with my reading and with my maths. I want to get ahead. I want to get my reading up, my maths and my spelling, and my handwriting up. Ive wanted to do that since I was in Year 4Evidence that self esteem is the result of success in school. (Dryden et al., 1998,)InterveneChildren have quite firm beliefs about the relative power of teachers to do something if a students wellbeing was threatenedA: Miss A., shes really nice. She helps me with everything, she helps me with anything if Im stuck with anything. Like, she helped me through campWhen teachers didnt intervene for example with bullying or harassment they were criticised by their students

    *

  • The true measure of a nations standing is how well it attends to its children their health and safety, their material security, their education and socialization, and their sense of being loved, valued, and included in the families and societies into which they are born. (Unicef, Report card 7, 2007)

    *

    *

    children in care*Feeling at home; comfortable with oneself; like a fish in water

    Sense of wellbeing - what are the signs?Def. from NIHCE 2012Emot. wellbeing = being happy, confident; not anxious or depressedPsychological wellbeing = ability to be autonomous, problem solve, manage emotions, experience empathy, resilience attentiveSocial wellbeing = has good relationships with others, does not have behav. probs. disruptive, bully, violent

    Important in own right but basis for a healthy life.*Agreed definition needed and if you wish to use a measure for enquiry need to be clear which definitions and indicators you are using.*Watch two clips and look for signs THEN look at what Laevers says (editor, 2005)Handout

    pretend play the dancing class*See handout *The Good Childhood Report 2015, published by the Childrens Society, provides the latest picture of childrens subjective well-being, including the impact of bullying

    Anti-Bullying Week is organised by the Anti-Bullying Alliance

    (Taken from the government website) By law, all state (not private) schools must have a behaviour policy in place that includes measures to prevent all forms of bullying among pupils. This policy is decided by the school. (https://www.gov.uk/bullying-at-school/the-law)

    All other websites have plenty of resources and advice for professionals*Place2Be provides emotional and therapeutic services in primary and secondary schools, building children's resilience through talking, creative work and play. Place2Be works with 257 primary and secondary schools, reaching a school population of 105,000 children, helping them to cope with wide-ranging and often complex social issues including bullying, bereavement, domestic violence, family breakdown, neglect and trauma. Locally, there are 4 Place2Be schools in the Hastings area (3 primaries, 1 secondary)

    YoungMinds is the UKs leading charity committed to improving the emotional wellbeing and mental health of children and young people. Website informative on mental health issues, as well as info on Academic Resilience

    Boing Boing Angie Hart (Uni of Bton) looks at resilience specfically. They say We were curious to know why some children facing similar difficulties and ongoing social disadvantage did better than others. The website gives info on resilience as well as resource info

    Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) provide specialist NHS mental healthServices. It is a multidisciplinary service, that is it includes a range of child mental healthprofessionals such as child psychiatrists, child psychotherapists, family therapists,childrens psychiatric nurses) and therapists such as art therapists. Referral normally through a GP.*Gender issues here and nature: nurture tensionStereotyping boys with in ability or reluctance in expressing emotions accentuated in generally slower language development *How do we gauge this professional distance?The difference between being a friend and a professional.*The implications for pedagogy and child teacher relationships are profound,since engagement in learning, students achievements and supportive relationshipswith teachers are centre stage in developing emotional well-being. Developing an ethic of care would be a priority. Teachers as the caring other equate to the pedagogy of relationships.

    *Australian longitudinal study begun in 1997 and completed in 2005 bound up with the continuous acts of meaning making that teachers and students engage in throughout the school day.

    Being available/showing an interest -She is a really special person to me because even though Im not in her class she invites me over sometimes to do plays.As soon as I walk in the door and she says, Hello it just makes me happy. ListenTheyre really nice people and they listen to most people when theyve got problems and they help them out Contrast teachers who dont listen My maths teacher, I hate her. She doesnt listen to you. She just doesnt listen to you

    Being positive My teacher is important because hes the one that urges me on to do stuff. He says comeon Christopher, you can do it, just think positive, and if it wasnt for him I couldnt have done all of this that I have.

    Teach the basicsThey help me with my work and they help me with my reading and with my maths. I want to get ahead. I want to get my reading up, my maths and my spelling, and my handwriting up. Ive wanted to do that since I was in Year 4Evidence that self esteem is the result of success in school. (Dryden et al., 1998,)InterveneChildren have quite firm beliefs about the relative power of teachers to do something if a students wellbeing was threatenedA: Miss A., shes really nice. She helps me with everything, she helps me with anything if Im stuck with anything. Like, she helped me through campWhen teachers didnt intervene for example with bullying or harassment they were criticised by their students

    *

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