The Elizabethan Period or The Renaissance

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THE ELIZABETHAN PERIOD OR THE RENAISSANCE

BY :DEDE FADLILLAHFUZIANTI HOERUNNISAIQBAL AWALUDIN RAKHMANRENI EKA SARIPEBRIYANTISETIAWANTHE ELIZABETHAN PERIOD OR THE RENAISSANCE1485-1509: Reign of Henry VII1509-1547: Reign of Henry VIII1534: Act of Supremacy1536-1539: Monasteries closed1539: First Bible in English1547-1553: Reign of Edward VIMAIN EVENTS1553-1558: Reign of Mary I1558-1603: Reign of Elizabeth I1577-1580: Sir Fancis Drake1584: The Book of Common Prayer1588: The Spanish Armada destroyed1601: The Poor Law

Thomas More Utopia (1478-1535)Italian influenceFrom Petrarchan sonnet to Elizabethan sonnet

THE LITERARY BACKGROUND

Born in Stratford in 1564 (April 23rd)Become an actor, well-known as a dramatistIn 1595 he joined The Lord Chamberlains MenWrote 37 plays in a period of twenty years

SHAKESPEAREPeriod I: Plays of ExperimentationPeriod II: Artistic MaturityPeriod III: The Great TragedyPeriod IV: Last Plays154 sonnetsDied on April, 23rd 1616

Sir Phillip Sydney: Astrophel and StellaEdmund Spenser: the AmorettiThomas Sackville: the Mirror of MagistratesGeorge Chapman: IliadMichael Drayton: PolyolbonBen Johnson: Hymn to Diana

POETRYThomas Kyd: The Spanish TragedyBen Jonson: VolponeJohn Lyly: Alexander and CampaspeChristopher Marlowe The Last Moment of Dr. FaustusDRAMAThomas Norths translation of Plutarchs LivesChapmans translation of HomerPatericks MachiavelliThe Authorized Version of the BibleFancis Bacons EssaysPROSEMy love is as a fever longing still,For that which longer nurseth the disease;Feeding on that which doth preserve the ill,The uncertain sickly appetite to please.My reason, the physician to my love, Angry that his prescriptions are not kept,Hath left me, and I desperate now approveDesire is death, which physic did except.Past cure I am, now Reason is past care,And frantic-mad with evermore unrest;My thoughts and my discourse as madmen's are,At random from the truth vainly expressed;For I have sworn thee fair, and thought thee bright,Who art as black as hell, as dark as night.

SONNET CXLVIIMY loue is as a feauer longing till, For that which longer nureth the dieae, Feeding on that which doth preerue the ill, Th'vncertaine icklie appetite to pleae: My reaon the Phiition to my loue, Angry that his precriptions are not kept Hath left me,and I deperate now approoue, Deire is death,which Phiick did except . Pat cure I am,now Reaon is pat care, And frantick madde with euer-more vnret, My thoughts and my dicoure as mad mens are, At randon from the truth vainely expret. For I haue worne thee faire,and thought theebright, Who art as black as hell,as darke as night.

The 1609 Quarto Version

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