Learning Styles

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Text of Learning Styles

  • 1. Directing Learning Experiences Student Learning Styles

2. Objectives

  • Discuss the importance of considering students' learning styles when designing lessons
  • Evaluate the learning style of your students
  • Assess your own learning style
  • Design lessons that take into account differences in students' learning styles

3. Why Is It Important to Know Students Learning Styles?

  • Students process information differently
  • If educators teach exclusively to one style students comfort level may be diminished
  • If only taught in one style students may lose mental dexterity to think in different ways
  • Meet the learning needs of all students

4. Field-dependent and Field Independent Characteristics(Garger & Guild, 1984)

  • Field Dependent Learner
  • perceives globally
  • experiences in a global fashion, adheres to structures as givenships
  • social orientation
  • learns material with social content best

5. Field-dependent and Field Independent Characteristics (Garger & Guild, 1984)

  • Field Dependent Learners
  • attends best to material relevant to own experience
  • requires externally defined goals and reinforcements
  • needs organization provided
  • more affected by criticism
  • uses spectator approach for conceptattainment

6. Field-Dependent and Field Independent Characteristics(Garger & Guild, 1984)

  • Field Independent Learners
  • perceives analytically
  • experiences in an articulated fashion, imposes structure or restrictions
  • makes specific concept distinctions, little overlap
  • impersonal orientation

7. Field-Dependent and Field Independent Characteristics(Garger & Guild, 1984)

  • Field Independent Learners-
  • learns social material as an intentional task
  • interested in new concepts for their own sake
  • has self-defined goals and reinforcement
  • can self-structure situations
  • less affected by criticism
  • uses hypothesis-testing approach to attain concepts

8. Field-Dependent and Field Independent Characteristics(Garger & Guild, 1984)

  • Field Dependent Teaching Styles
  • prefers teaching situations that allow interaction and discussion with students
  • uses questions to check on student learning following instruction
  • uses student-centered activities
  • viewed by students as teaching facts
  • provides less feedback, avoids negative evaluation
  • strong in establishing a warm and personal learning environment

9. Field-Dependent and Field Independent Characteristics(Garger & Guild, 1984)

  • Field Independent Teaching Styles
  • prefers impersonal teaching situations such as lectures, emphasizes cognitive aspects of instruction
  • uses questions to introduce topics and probe student answers
  • uses teacher-organized learning situations
  • viewed by students as encouraging to apply principles
  • gives corrective feedback, uses negative evaluation
  • strong in organizing and guiding student learning

10. Learning Styles Analytic vs. Global Learners www.wavefront.com/~nelson/styles.htm

  • Analytical Learners
  • Left-brained
  • Words
  • Numbers
  • Parts
  • Sequential
  • Linear
  • Detail
  • Verbal
  • Punctual
  • Organized
  • Global Learners
  • Right-brained
  • Images
  • Patterns
  • Wholes
  • Simultaneous
  • Patterns
  • Whole picture
  • Non-verbal
  • Without sense of time
  • Creative
  • Intuitive
  • Spontaneous

11. Learning Styles Sensory Learning Modalities

  • VISUAL - (learn by seeing and writing)
  • 40% of learners
  • Can be verbal (sees words) or pictorial (sees pictures)
  • Remembers faces but not names
  • Vivid imaginations
  • Think in pictures
  • Facial expression tells what their emotions are
  • Uses color
  • Caution: TV, Movies, Nintendo can be addicting

12. Learning Styles Sensory Learning Modalities

  • AUDITORY - (learn by listening)
  • 30% of learners
  • Learn from verbal instruction
  • Need phonics
  • Enjoy plays
  • Write lightly and it is not always legible
  • Remember names and forget faces
  • Distracted by noise
  • Remember by listening, especially with music
  • Games and pictures are annoying and distracting

13. Learning Styles Sensory Learning Modalities

  • KINESTHETIC - (large motor, whole body learning)
  • Learn by doing
  • Not avid reader
  • Poor spellers
  • Remember what was done
  • Doesn't "hear" things as well
  • Touch is important
  • Attacks things physically - fight, hit, pound
  • Impulsive
  • Needs math and science manipulatives
  • Loves games

14. Learning Styles Sensory Learning Modalities

  • TACTILE - (small motor learning)
  • Most of the same traits as kinesthetic
  • Note: Kinesthetic and tactile learners have the most difficulty learning to read.
  • Note: All children are very kinesthetic to age 6.

15. Learning Styles Models The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI)

  • http://www2.ncsu.edu/unity/lockers/users/f/felder/public/Papers/LS-Prism.htm
  • extraverts (try things out, focus on the outer world of people)
  • or introverts (think things through, focus on the inner world of ideas);
  • sensors (practical, detail-oriented, focus on facts and procedures)
  • or intuitors (imaginative, concept-oriented, focus on meanings and possibilities);

16. Learning Styles Models The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI)

  • thinkers (skeptical, tend to make decisions based on logic and rules)
  • or feelers (appreciative, tend to make decisions based on personal and humanistic considerations);
  • judgers (set and follow agendas, seek closure even with incomplete data)
  • or perceivers (adapt to changing circumstances, resist closure to obtain more data).

17. Learning Styles Models Kolb's Learning Style Model

  • Type 1 (concrete, reflective).
    • A characteristic question of this learning type is "Why?"
    • learners respond well to explanations of how course material relates to their experience, their interests, and their future careers.
    • To be effective instructor should function as a motivator.

18. Learning Styles Models Kolb's Learning Style Model

  • Type 2 (abstract, reflective).
    • A characteristic question of this learning type is "What?"
    • learners respond to information presented in an organized, logical fashion and benefit if they have time for reflection.
    • To be effective, the instructor should function as an expert.

19. Learning Styles Models Kolb's Learning Style Model

  • Type 3 (abstract, active).
    • A characteristic question of this learning type is "How?"
    • learners respond to having opportunities to work actively on well-defined tasks and to learn by trial-and-error in an environment that allows them to fail safely.
    • To be effective, the instructor should function as a coach, providing guided practice and feedback.

20. Learning Styles Models Kolb's Learning Style Model

  • Type 4 (concrete, active).
    • A characteristic question of this learning type is "What if?"
    • learners like applying course material in new situations to solve real problems.
    • To be effective, the instructor should stay out of the way, maximizing opportunities for the students to discover things for themselves.

21. Learning Styles Models Herrmann Brain Dominance Instrument (HBDI)

  • Quadrant A(left brain, cerebral). Logical, analytical, quantitative, factual, critical
  • Quadrant B(left brain, limbic). Sequential, organized, planned, detailed, structured
  • Quadrant C(right brain, limbic). Emotional, interpersonal, sensory, kinesthetic, symbolic
  • Quadrant D(right brain, cerebral). Visual, holistic, innova