How To Create Government Websites That Dont Suck

  • Published on
    19-Aug-2014

  • View
    16.056

  • Download
    3

Embed Size (px)

DESCRIPTION

This presentation was held on 18 August 2009 at Wellington Regional Chamber of Commerce as a breakfast briefing for Government departments.

Transcript

  • Trent Mankelow How to create government websites that dont suck
  • Trent Mankelow How to create government websites that dont suck rock!
  • "Despite promises of dramatic change and continuous innovation early on, ...the public sector today looks much as it did when the Internet began its ascendancy" - United Nations e-Government Survey 2008
  • 64% of public sector organisations expected to spend money on a new/upgraded website in 2008/09. 53% expected to spend money on new/upgraded online services in 2008/09. - Government Use of ICT 2008
  • We are falling behind
    • We slipped from 19th place in 2007 to 31st in 2008 according to the Global E-Government Report
    • We were 13th in the UN list, now were 18th
  • The Internet should TRANSFORM government
  • The Internet should be the number one channel for government agencies
    • Improve public sector efficiency
    • Convenience and 24 x 7 availability
    • Advance democracy
  • But instead of transforming government, innovation has tended to be small-scale and gradual
  • How to create government websites that rock 01: Create a citizen-centred culture 02: Create an actionable, citizen-centric 03: Improve findability 04: Follow a user-centred design process online strategy
  • 01: Create a citizen-centred culture
  • Currently many government departments have a shared accountability model
    • When something is owned by everybody, it is owned by nobody
    • This model can't help but trend toward mediocrity
  • Competing priorities was the most commonly cited factor restricting the implementation of new ICT in government
  • So don't make it compete
  • Hire a Chief Citizen Officer
  • Reboot culture
  • Values for successful web teams
    • Networking and broad contacts externally and internally
    • Respect for individuals
    • Trust
    • Sharing of ideas and information
    • Sound underlying systems and procedures
    • Continuous learning and development
    • Creativity and innovation
  • 02: Create an actionable, citizen-centric online strategy
  • Know who your users are and what their goals are
  • Stop designing for "all New Zealanders"
  • The trouble is that when you design for everyone, you design for no-one
  • Better websites start with better understanding
  • Conduct basic research to segment and understand your audience
  • One great way to stop designing for all New Zealanders this is to use personas
  • Create a coherent, lightweight online strategy
  • Use a simple process
      • Interview stakeholders
      • Understand your users (user survey, web analytics)
      • In a workshop:
        • Agree your key users and their tasks (based on research)
        • Brainstorm website goals and vision individually and then collate common themes and patterns
        • Brainstorm future initiatives individually and then collate common themes and patterns
      • Firm up goals, provide definitions and ways to measure the goals. Research themes and get other example websites
      • In a workshop:
        • Finalise goals and vision
        • Talk through the initiatives
        • Map the effectiveness of each initiative to achieve each goal
        • Prioritise initiatives based on their effectiveness across all goals
      • Finalise strategy
  • Don't develop the strategy in isolation create a cross-channel strategy
  • 03: Improve findability
  • Finding stuff
    • and get bigger
  • In 2020, the amount of info on the web will double every 72 hours
    • In some government departments, new websites spring up like mushrooms
    • Governments are broken up into competing agencies and jurisdictions
    Too many sites
  • Citizens shouldn't have to know about the mechanics of government in order to be able to interact with it
  • Remove redundant content, and consolidate sites to make stuff easier to find
  • Fix iGovt
  • Make iGovt seamless
  • 04: Follow a user-centred design process
  • There are real costs when government websites are unusable
  • Website use typically doubles when the site is made easier to use
  • Use ISO13407
  • Use ISO 13407
    • Project planning shall allocate time and resources for the human-centred activities. This shall include time for iteration and the incorporation of user feedback, and for evaluating whether the design solution satisfies the user requirements.
    • Relevant user and stakeholder groups shall be identified and their relationship with the proposed development described in terms of key goals and constraints.
    • There are four linked human-centred design activities that shall take place during the design of any interactive system
      • Understand and specify the context of use;
      • Specify the user requirements;
      • Produce design solutions;
      • Evaluate.
  • "Usability standards are likely to have the most influence when cited in commercial contracts....Require a design and development project to carry out activities that conform with ISO 13407 - International Standards for Usability Should Be More Widely Used, Nigel Bevan, Journal of Usability Studies, Volume 4, Issue 3, May 2009, pp. 106-113
  • Conclusion
  • Success stories
  • The results Original success rate Final success rate Increase Client 38% 74% 36% Provider 44% 69% 25% Business 29% 77% 48% Target increase Actual increase Page views (users) 10% 25% Page views (staff) 10% 32%
  • How to create government websites that rock 01: Create a citizen-centred culture 02: Create an actionable, citizen-centric 03: Improve findability 04: Follow a user-centred design process online strategy
  • It shouldn't be e-Government. It should just be government
  • Thanks Trent Mankelow Optimal Usability [email_address]