Cristo Rey and De La Salle: Coincidence? Maybe!

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Presentation to Board of De La Salle North Catholic to discuss the integration of Cristo Rey philosophy with De la Salle educational philosophy

Text of Cristo Rey and De La Salle: Coincidence? Maybe!

  • 1. History of the Cristo Rey Network October, 2012Transforming Urban America One Student at a Time

2. Opening Prayer Let us remember. that we are in the holy presence of God.Transforming Urban America One Student at a Time 3. Contents Network History Where we came from Mission Effectiveness Standards Network Update Where we are todayBuilding A School Around Students September 06, 1996 Is Cristo Rey Jesuit High School every students nightmare or every students Value of the Network dream? Probably a bit of both, but one thing is certain: The kids who go there will come out with an education--and more. Thats what is so appealing about the new school, which opened this week on Chicagos Southwest Side. In an age when public school calendars seem to include as many holidays, half-days and "institute days" as classroom days, students at Cristo Rey will attend school 10 1/2 months a year.3Transforming Urban America One Student at a Time 4. Why did the Jesuits open Cristo Rey in Chicago in 1996? High drop out rates Fr. Jim Gartland, S.J., spoke to parents, community leaders, educators, and young people. Biggest need was a high school. Parents wanted a school where students would be known and cared for (two big high schools in Pilsen/Little Village had high dropout rates, were violent places, and were big and impersonal). Parents knew that going to college was important How do we pay for this? Fully 65% of children in Pilsen drop out of school, according to the Chicago Board of Education, with dire consequences for their future participation in the work force. Pilsens main high school, Benito Juarez reports that 94.5% of their students are classified as low income. In 1990, Latino youth (ages 16 to 19) unemployment in Chicago was 27.9%. The 1990 U.S. census reported a 13% unemployment rate for all Pilsen workers, compared to 7% for the city of Chicago. More recent estimates range4 up to 25%.Transforming Urban America One Student at a Time 5. Work Study ProgramThe school and the work-study program are separate corporations.CWSP ---------HIGH SCHOOL fundingEmployers contract with schoolswork-study corporation. This flat fee is a business expense. Someprofessional service firms include it in the contract with a education vendor, i.e, mail room. etc. and feeit does not add to the expenses. ---------Students are employees of ourwork-study business ---------The employer receives theSTUDENTSwork CORPORATE CLIENTSservices of student employees each day of the week.Transforming Urban America One Student at a Time 6. Team of four students fill 1 FTEStudent-workers are put into JOB-SHARING teams and their academic schedules are modified so thatfour students job share a full-time entry level job without missing class. (5 days/week; Monday-Friday; 8 hours; Late August to mid-June with full year option)Mon. Tue.Wed. Thurs. Fri.Week 1Week 2Week 3Week 4Transforming Urban America One Student at a Time 7. Types of JobsTransforming Urban America One Student at a Time 8. 1999 2000: Educators seek to replicate Cristo Rey Jesuit High School Original school was getting students to college Work Study Program was successful Catholic educators were looking for a way to make private, Catholic education affordable to urban young people Historical context in the 1990s and 2000s, small, innovative charter schools were popping up all over the country. Results of the charter school is no doubt mixed, but the long waiting lists reinforce that parents in urban areas are looking for an alternative. We knew parents across the country were looking for an alternative, just as the parents in Pilsen were a few years earlier. Rich Clark and three Jesuits, including Fr. Foley, made a pilgrimage to Peru in 2000 to learn about the Fe & Alegria (Faith & Joy) schools schools that educated the poor. Key Learnings: Starting point of a Fe & Alegria School is the poor and their needs the mission comes from the people served Fe & Alegrias formal Network and mission statement came many years after the schools started-- concluded the best thing to do was start schools; a formal Network could come later 8Transforming Urban America One Student at a Time 9. Network History Where we came from September 1996: June 2000: BJ Cassin May 2001: September 2001: Firstvisits Cristo Rey and Cristo Rey Jesuit HighFirst meeting of the replication Portland commits $12 million to School opensCristo Rey Networkopens support replication Jan. 2003: Original Dec. 2002: Cristo Rey May 2003: Gates Grant September 2004: Six Presidents agree toNetwork incorporated as of $9.9 million to continue schools open NetworkMission Effectivenessa 501(c)(3) replicationnow at 11 schoolsStandards May 2006: Gates makes second grant ($6 million) September 2007: SevenSeptember 2008: Three2011-12: 24 Schools, to support more growth &Schools open now 19new schools open 22 more defined role of thebuild capacity of the schoolsschools Network CenterNetwork center 9Transforming Urban America One Student at a Time 10. B.J. & Bebe Cassin 10Transforming Urban America One Student at a Time 11. Melinda Gates 11Transforming Urban America One Student at a Time 12. Contents Network History Where we came from Mission Effectiveness Standards Network Update Where we are today Value of the Network 12Transforming Urban America One Student at a Time 13. Mission Effectiveness Standards A Cristo Rey school . . .1. Is explicitly Catholic in mission and enjoys Church approval.2. Serves only economically disadvantaged students. The school is open to students of various faiths and cultures.3. Is family centered and plays an active role in the local community.4. Is accredited by a recognized regional accrediting association. It has a college preparatory curriculum designed for a high level of student engagement in their learning.5. Requires participation by all students in the work-study program. All students must be 14 years old on or before September 1st.6. Seeks to integrate the learning present in its work program, classroom and extracurricular experiences for the fullest benefit of its student workers.7. Has an effective administrative and board structure as well as complies with all applicable state and federal laws.8. Is financially sound. At full enrollment the school is primarily dependent on revenue from the work-study program to meet operating expenses. In addition, the school maintains a comprehensive advancement program to ensure financial stability.9. Seeks to understand, assure, and improve how and how well its students learn and grow.10. Is an active participant in the collaboration, support, and development of the Cristo ReyNetwork.13Transforming Urban America One Student at a Time 14. Standard Two:A Cristo Rey school serves only economically disadvantaged students. The school is open to students of various faiths and cultures. All accepted applicants to a Cristo Rey school must complete a third-party financial aid process approved by the Network that incorporates their most recently filed tax records, family demographics (e.g., family size) and other relevant financial information. The school annually shares the student income information from the third-party financial aid service with the Network. Through its admissions process, the school continually renews its commitment to the marginalized by aggressively seeking students from economically disadvantaged families and neighborhoods. Specifically, schools recruit students who are eligible for the federal free/reduced lunch program. As a result, each school maintains an admissions policy that considers student income levels and meets one of the following measures for all incoming students: the per capita Adjusted Available Family Income for an individual students family (asdetermined by a Network-approved third-party financial aid service) shall not exceed 75% ofthe per capita Median Household Income (as indicated by the U.S. Census Bureaus mostrecent American Community Survey) of the city in which the school is located or for the nation,whichever is higher; or the total Adjusted Available Family Income for an individual students family (as determined bya Network-approved third-party financial aid service) shall not exceed 75% of the MedianHousehold Income (as indicated by the U.S. Census Bureaus most recent AmericanCommunity Survey) of the city in which the school is located or for the nation, whichever ishigher. Beyond the assistance provided by the work-study program, the school provides financial aid to families who cannot afford the full tuition, while maintaining a policy that every student must pay something.14Transforming Urban America One Student at a Time 15. Contents Network History Where we came from Mission Effectiveness Standards Network Update Where we are today Value of the Network 15Transforming Urban America One Student at a Time 16. Where we stand today as a NetworkChicago Pilsen (Opened1996)Portland (2001) Network SchoolsLos Angeles (2002)Austin (2002) (withdrew)Denver (2003)Boston (2004)Cleveland (2004)Lawrence (2004)New York (2004)Tucson (2004)Waukegan (2004)Kansas City (2006)Sacramento (2006)Baltimore (2007)Birmingham (2007)Indianapolis (2007) School Growth by Year & Projected OpeningsMinneapolis (2007)Newark (2007)Omaha (2007) (closed)7School OpeningsWashington DC (2007)6Brooklyn (2008)Chicago West (2008)Detroit (2008)Houston (2009) 3San Francisco (2009)2 2Cincinnati (2011)Philadelphia (2012) 11100 1 1 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013Transforming Urban America One Student at a Time 17. Cristo Rey Network Update (2011-12 by the numbers): Replication Strategy Has Been Successful 25 schools in 19 states (DePaul Cristo Rey to open in Fall 2011) 7,000+ students 2,000 projected annual graduates in coming years 1750 corporate job partners (250 new this year) $30+ million revenue earned in