World History, Part I - Sonlight 2 Chronicles 25 2 Chronicles 26 2 Chronicles 27 2 Chronicles 28 2 Chronicles

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  • Major Non-Western Cultures/Introduction/Page

    World History, Part I

    Instructor’s Guide and Notes by John & Sarita Holzmann

  • World History, Part 1 ♦ Section Two ♦ Week 9 ♦ Schedule

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    . Week 9—Five-Day Schedule

    Date: Day 1 41 Day 2 42 Day 3 43 Day 4 44 Day 5 45

    Bible Reading

    2 Chronicles 25 2 Chronicles 26 2 Chronicles 27 2 Chronicles 28 2 Chronicles 29:1-19

    Children's Bible Handbook

    Lesson 9, plus one “To Think About and Do” problem each day.

    Memorization

    Finish memorizing Psalm 15 this week.

    History The Story of the World: Ancient Times History Guide pp. 7-18

    chap. 28 pp. 220-225

    chap. 29

    chap. 30 pp. 233-237

    chap. 30 pp. 237-240

    ❏ ➣ ❏

    chap. 31

    The Usborne Encyclopedia of World History History Guide pp. 31-49

    pp. 190-191 pp. 185-187 pg. 174 pg. 175

    Current Events ❏

    Readers Archimedes and the Door of Science Reader Guide pp. 5-6

    chaps. 1-2

    ❏ ➣ ❏

    chaps. 3-4

    ➣ ❏

    chaps. 5-6 chaps. 7-10 chaps. 11-end

    Read-Aloud(s) The Trojan War Read-Aloud Guide pp. 71-74

    Part IV chaps. 1-2

    chap. 3 chaps. 4-5

    ➣ ❏

    chaps. 6-7 Part V chap. 1

    Favorite Poems Old and New

    pp. 112-114 pp. 115-120 pp. 121-124 pp. 124-125 pp. 126-127

    Physical Education

    Other Notes

  • World History, Part 1 ♦ Section Two ♦ Week 9 ♦ Schedule

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    . Week 9—Four-Day Schedule

    Date: Day 1 41 Day 2 42 Day 3 43 Day 4 44 Day 5 45

    Bible Reading

    2 Chronicles 17 2 Chronicles 18 2 Chronicles 19 2 Chronicles 20

    Children's Bible Handbook

    Lesson 9, plus one “To Think About and Do” problem each day.

    Memorization

    Finish memorizing Psalm 15 this week.

    History The Story of the World: Ancient Times History Guide pp. 7-18

    chap. 27

    ❏ ➣ ❏

    chap. 28 pp. 215-220

    chap. 28 pp. 220-225

    chap. 29

    The Usborne Encyclopedia of World History History Guide pp. 31-49

    pg. 184

    ➣ ❏

    pp. 188-189

    ➣ ❏

    pp. 190-191 pp. 185-187

    Current Events ❏

    Readers Theras and His Town Reader Guide pp. 49-50

    chaps. xii-xv

    ➣ ❏

    chaps. xvi-xviii

    ➣ ❏

    chaps. xix-xxii

    ➣ ❏

    chaps. xxiii-xxvii

    ➣ ❏

    Read-Aloud(s) The Trojan War Read-Aloud Guide pp. 71-74

    Part I chaps. 1-2

    chaps. 3-5

    ➣ ❏

    Part II chap. 1

    ➣ ❏

    chap. 2

    Favorite Poems Old and New

    pp. 106-108 pp. 109-112 pp. 113-115 pp. 116-121

    Physical Education

    Other Notes

  • 14 ♦ World History, Part 1 ♦ History Study Guide ♦ The Story of the World: Ancient Times

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    . The Olmec of Central America, or “Mesoamerica,” lived in Mexico (ca. 1200-900 BC). They built dirt pyramids, and created enormous statues of heads nine feet tall.

    Chapter 27 Rome founded (753 BC)

    ➣ Rome; Italy

    Events and Comments for Study and Discussion

    A king put his grandsons, Romulus and Remus, into baskets on the Tiber River to keep them from coming to power. A wolf found the two babies and suckled them until a shepherd adopted them. When the boys were grown, they came to seven hills. The brothers thought it would be shrewd to build a city on hills, since such a city would be hard to attack. Romulus declared himself king of the town, but Remus challenged him. Romulus then killed Remus and named his city “Rome,” after himself (753 BC). Thus, Rome was founded.

    The Etruscans lived in northern Italy (ca. 800 BC). They traveled to Greece, and learned Greek culture.

    The Romans sought to control all of Italy and conquered the Etruscans. The Etruscans taught the Romans Greek culture.

    In Rome, only rich and powerful men could vote. They were the patricians. Two patricians were elected to control the city, called the consuls.

    Chapter 28 Events and Comments for Study and Discussion

    The Romans worshipped the same gods as the Greeks, but renamed them. For example, Zeus became Jupiter; Poseidon became Neptune; and Aphrodite became Venus.

    Once the Romans controlled all of Italy, they built roads so they could govern well. They first dug wide ditches, then filled the ditches with sand, poured small stones on top of the sand, and poured concrete over the stones. They put paving stones on top of the concrete, and set up mile markers between cities. Some of Rome’s roads are still in use today.

    The Romans were the first to use concrete; they built apartment houses up to five stories tall.

    The Romans also designed a way to get water into the cities. They built aqueducts, or bridges that transport water.

    For amusement, Romans would watch the gladiators perform in the arena. These performances were often blood-baths, with men (often prisoners from conquests) killing each other.

    Chapter 29 Punic Wars (264-146 BC)

    Hannibal (ca. 247-182 BC)

    Hannibal crossed Alps with elephants (218 BC)

    Events and Comments for Study and Discussion

    Carthage and Rome went to war. Both cities wanted to control trade on the Mediterranean.

    Carthage had the early advantage because they had a navy and Rome did not even know how to make ships. But when a Carthaginian ship wrecked on the Italian coast, the Romans studied it and figured out how to copy it.

    Hannibal crossed the Alps with forty elephants, specially trained to fight. The Romans fled in terror, and Hannibal fought up and down Italy.

    Under Roman general Scipio, the Romans sailed to Carthage and attacked. Hannibal returned home to help his city, but his soldiers were defeated. Carthage finally surrendered. (The First Punic War was from 264- 241 BC; the Second Punic War was from 218-202 BC.)

    Chapter 30 Aryans control Indus Valley (1500-500 BC)

    Gautama Buddha (563-483 BC) founds Buddhism (ca. 500 BC)

    ➣ Ganges River

    Events and Comments for Study and Discussion

    Settlers, called “Aryans,” came to the Indus Valley (ca. 1500 BC, with the high point of civilization ca. 500 BC). They worshipped the gods Shiva and Ganga, some of the gods of Hinduism.

    All Hindu believers worship the Ganges River.

    In Hinduism, the story of creation begins with an enormous man, named Purusha. The gods divide up his body and it becomes the earth. For example, the head becomes the sky and the eyes the sun.

    Different castes also came from Purusha. The Brahmin caste came from Purusha’s mouth. They were the priests, people of honor, wealth, and intelligence. The warriors came from Purusha’s arms. They protected

  • 38 ♦ World History, Part 1 ♦ History Study Guide ♦ The Usborne Encyclopedia of World History

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    . pg. 185 Events and Comments for Study and Discussion

    The Punic Wars began in 264 BC between Rome and Carthage and lasted until Carthage was destroyed in 146 BC. The Romans then conquered all the lands around the Mediterranean.

    General Julius Caesar seized power of Rome in 49 BC, but some senators stabbed him when they thought he wanted to make himself king.

    In 31 BC Augustus defeated Mark Anthony and became Rome’s first emperor.

    pp. 186-187 Events and Comments for Study and Discussion

    Over the next 150 years the Romans built a huge empire. It was at its largest under Emperor Trajan in AD 117.

    The Romans won many wars because they had a strong, well-organized army who fought in disciplined groups. They surrounded cities and then used clever techniques to conquer them.

    Romans built many strong roads to help soldiers travel long distances easily.

    pp. 188-189 ➣ Pompeii

    Events and Comments for Study and Discussion

    When Rome conquered a land, they installed a governor and made sure people paid taxes and followed Roman rules.

    New well-planned Roman towns with temples and baths were built all over the empire.

    Rich people in Rome had fancy, spacious, houses with gardens, central heating, and their own water supply.

    Romans built aqueducts because they needed water for public baths and fountains. These pipes carried water a great distance across hills and valleys.

    The wealthy town Pompeii in southern Italy was buried under ash and scorching lava in AD 79 when Mount Vesuvius erupted.

    pp. 190-191 Events and Comments for Study and Discussion

    Gladiators were slaves or criminals who entertained crowds. Thousands were killed in thi