Word 2010 keyboard shortcuts 2010 keyboard shortcuts

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Before you begin

Note to trainers

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Before you begin

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Microsoft Word 2010 Training

Keyboard shortcuts

[Notes to trainer:

This presentation must be viewed in PowerPoint 2010. If you dont have PowerPoint 2010, the videos included in the presentation will not play. If you dont have PowerPoint 2010, download the PowerPoint Viewer to view these files (http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?displaylang=en&FamilyID=cb9bf144%2D1076%2D4615%2D9951%2D294eeb832823).

If the yellow security bar appears at the top of the screen in PowerPoint, or if a Codec Unavailable message appears in the video playback window, the presentation might have opened in Protected View. To enable video playback, in the yellow security bar at the top of the PowerPoint window, click Enable Editing.

To browse other downloadable [Product Name] training presentations, see the Download Office 2010 training page (http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/powerpoint-help/download-office-2010-training-HA101901726.aspx).

For detailed help in customizing this template, see the very last slide. Also, look for additional lesson text in the notes pane of some slides.]

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Course contents

Overview: Master the CTRL and ALT keys

Lesson: Includes 9 instructional movies

Quick Reference Card

Word 2010 keyboard shortcuts

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Overview: Keyboard shortcuts

Word 2010 keyboard shortcuts

Learn Word 2010 keyboard shortcuts. Find out how to access almost any button using the ALT key. And, learn handy shortcuts that use the CTRL key.

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Course goals

Define the two kinds of keyboard shortcuts: access keys and key combinations

Access tabs, buttons, options, and commands using the ALT key

Directly perform tasks by using the CTRL key.

Perform a variety of tasks using the keyboard: from opening and working with documents to selecting and formatting text.

Word 2010 keyboard shortcuts

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Introduction (1:40)

Word 2010 keyboard shortcuts

Point to the bottom of the video to see the video controls. Drag or point along the progress bar to move forward or go back.

Once you get the hang of Word 2010, youll want to find ways to work faster.

In other words; get more done in less time with less work, and keyboard shortcuts are a great way to do that.

What is a keyboard shortcut? Well its a way to save time by using your keyboard instead of our mouse.

How does that help you work faster? Well lets say youre typing on your keyboard and you want to save your work.

You could move your hand to the mouse, move the cursor to the ribbon,

click Save, and then move your hand back to the keyboard.

Or you could save time by keeping your hands on the keyboard and pressing the keyboard shortcut; CTRL and S.

There are basically two kinds of shortcut keys: Access keys and Key combinations.

With Access keys you can get to things on your screen; like tabs, buttons, and menus

that youd normally access using a mouse and they typically start with the ALT key.

For example: pressing ALT then F brings up the file menu,

pressing P displays print details, and then pressing P again prints your documents.

Key combinations access commands directly, they usually start with the CTRL key.

For example: you can print your document with key combinations by pressing CTRL and P.

In this course well first cover access keys in detail, and then well go on to key combinations.

Click Next to begin.

[Note to trainer: If you have trouble playing this video, for instance if a Codec Unavailable message appears in the videoplayback window, the presentation might have opened in Protected View.To enable video playback, inthe yellow security bar at the top of the PowerPoint window, click Enable Editing.Note that even with Protected View turned on, video should play correctly in Slide Show view.]

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How to use access keys (3:15)

Word 2010 keyboard shortcuts

Point to the bottom of the video to see the video controls. Drag or point along the progress bar to move forward or go back.

If you want to access tabs, buttons, and menus in Word without using a mouse; you can use access keys

and the first step is pressing ALT. When you do that, key tips appear in the ribbon.

They show you which key to press to select an item, just like clicking it with the mouse.

For example: H selects the Home tab, and 1 selects Bold.

What if the key tip has two letters? For example: if you press P to go to the Page Layout tab,

youll see that the key tip for Line Numbers is LN; press one, then the other.

In this case, a menu opens and we can press the key tip that corresponds to the type of line numbering we want.

For example: C, for Continuous. To turn off the numbering press ALT, P, L, N, and then N for None.

If youre searching for a command you dont have to worry about getting stuck,

because you can always back out by pressing the ESC key.

If youre really lost, you can keep pressing ESC and youll eventually exit access key mode.

Access keys are easy to use because you dont need to memorize much; you just look at the key tip and press the key.

But if thats not easy enough, you can use the arrow keys.

First press ALT, the right and left arrow keys move you horizontally,

the up key moves you to the quick access toolbar, and the down key takes you to the commands on the ribbon.

When you arrive at a button that you would normally click with the mouse, press Enter.

Use the arrow keys to move around in galleries and menus,

then press ESC to back out, or press Enter to select a command or option.

The alternative to arrows is the Tab key. Press ALT, then press Tab to move forward through the items,

press Shift and Tab to move backward, and press Enter to select and item.

You can use a combination of arrow and tab keys for moving around in the ribbon.

For example: use the arrow keys to change tabs,

use the Tab key to move around in a tab,

then use the arrow keys to change values in a text box.

Next, youll see that the Tab key is especially useful when navigating in dialog boxes.

[Note to trainer: If you have trouble playing this video, for instance if a Codec Unavailable message appears in the videoplayback window, the presentation might have opened in Protected View.To enable video playback, inthe yellow security bar at the top of the PowerPoint window, click Enable Editing.Note that even with Protected View turned on, video should play correctly in Slide Show view.]

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Access keys in dialog boxes (3:16)

Word 2010 keyboard shortcuts

Point to the bottom of the video to see the video controls. Drag or point along the progress bar to move forward or go back.

Whenever you select an item that ends with an ellipsis,

or select one of these little arrows in the ribbon a dialog box opens.

There are no key tips in dialog boxes, instead press ALT

and look for an underlined letter in the item that you want to access.

Then select it by pressing ALT and the letter.

If the interline letter approach isnt to your liking, you can navigate using the Tab key.

Press Tab to move to the next menu or option, or press Shift-Tab to move back.

Youll know an item has the focus if there is a border around it.

If you need to switch tabs in a dialog box, press CTRL and the Tab key to go to the next tab,

then press Tab to change the focus to the item that you want.

If the item is a list; press the up and down arrows to open the list and locate an option, then press Enter to select it.

If you need to enter a value use the arrow keys to position the cursor,

and the keyboard to: select, delete, or type the text or numbers.

If a text box has up and down arrows like this one, you can enter a value with the up and down arrow keys.

What about checkboxes? If you come across a checkbox, press the Spacebar to select or clear the option.

As with the ribbon, youll find yourself using a combination of methods.

For example: you can press ALT and A to select this item, then press the arrow keys to enter a value.

Now that were all done with the settings in this dialog box, what do we do?

Look at the OK and Cancel buttons; if OK is highlighted in blue,

you can press Enter to accept your changes and close the dialog box.

If you want to discard your changes; you can Tab to the Cancel button and press Enter, or simply press ESC.

Heres another kind of dialog box that youll run into.

Press the Tab key to change focus to the navigation pane, then press the up and down arrows to select a section

and then Tab to the value that you want to change.

Press Enter to select an option, or use the up and down arrows to enter a value.

Now you can do almost anything with the access keys, but is that all? Not quite.

In the next video: well go through just a few last important tips for using access keys.

[Note to trainer: If you have trouble playing this video, for instance if a Codec Unavailable message appears in the videoplayback window, the presentation might have opened in Protected View.To enable video playback, inthe yellow security bar at the top of the PowerPoint window, click Enable Editing.Note that even with Protected View turned on, video should play correctly in Slide Show view.]

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F6: Another kind of access key (1:08)

Word 2010 keyboard shortcuts

Point to the bottom of the video to see the video controls. Drag or point along the progress bar to move forward or go back.

The access keys that you get to by pressing ALT enable you to work with commands on the ribbon and in dialog boxes.

But how do you navigate in other areas of Word without a mouse, such as the Status Bar?

To access these areas, you use F6. F6 cycles focus from your document,

to the status bar, to the ribbon, and then back to the document area.

When the focus is on the status bar, you can use the arrows keys and Enter to change the view or zoom levels.

When focus is on the ribbon, you can use the access keys to select options and commands,

then change focus back to the document.

Theres a lot you can do with access keys to save time and get more work done,

but you might find it easier to work with the other type of shortcut keys called key combinations.

To find out, click Next.

[Note to trainer: If you have trouble playing this video, for instance if a Codec Unavailable message appears in the videoplayback window, the presentation might have opened in Protected View.To enable video playback, inthe yellow security bar at the top of the PowerPoint window, click Enable Editing.Note that even with Protected View turned on, video should play correctly in Slide Show view.]

10

How to use key combinations (3:34)

Word 2010 keyboard shortcuts

Point to the bottom of the video to see the video controls. Drag or point along the progress bar to move forward or go back.

So weve covered access keys in detail, now its time to learn about the other kind of keyboard shortcut; key combinations.

If you want to get to Word commands and options directly

without using a mouse or your access keys, you can use key combinations.

Key combinations most often start by pressing and holding down the CTRL

or Shift and CTRL keys, and then pressing one or two other keys.

For example: to save a document you hold down the CTRL key then press S.

You can find lists of key combinations in the Quick Reference Card at the end of this course.

Theres a key combination for just about anything.

From opening a new file, to promoting bulleted lists in a SmartArt graphic.

Really the only drawback to key combinations is that you have to remember them, but thats not so bad.

First, you only need to remember the key combinations that you use most often.

For example: my favorite is CTRL-Z, undo. I dont have to worry about going overboard with a graphic

because I can always simply press CTRL-Z to return it to the way it was before.

Of course CTRL-S, save, is another favorite. Which brings up another point,

you can often remember key combinations by creating mental connections using the shortcut keys themselves.

For example: S for save. You can think of X, which is the shortcut key for cut as being a pair of scissors.

Of course there is CTRL-P for printing, CTRL-O for opening files, CTRL-F for finding text,

and CTRL-C for copying data to the clip board, and of course theres CTRL-V for pasting the contents of the clip board.

Well you just have to remember that one, but once you commit your favorite combinations to memory

youll find that you can use them in many other office programs and in other programs running on Microsoft Windows.

If youre memory needs a little nudge, you can always refer to the list in the Quick Reference Card at the end of this course.

And you can also find often find key combinations by holding the mouse cursor over a command and reading the ScreenTip.

But the key to remembering key combinations is to start small, start by using one like CTRL-S to save you time.

Then as you add more combinations to your repertoire, youll find yourself saving more and more time.

Pretty soon youll be adding flo...

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