Word 2010 keyboard shortcuts 2010 keyboard shortcuts

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Before you beginNote to trainersThe videos in this presentation provide closed-caption files as its often easier for viewers of all abilities to follow along. If you wish to remove the closed captions, you must install the Subtitling Add-in for Microsoft PowerPoint (STAMP). You can download the add-in from http://sourceforge.net/projects/stamp-addin/files/Latest%20Version/ Once you install the add-in, to turn the captions off: Locate a slide that contains a video and click the video. The Playback contextual tab appears on the top of the window. If you dont click the video, the Playback tab wont be visible.On the Playback tab, click Hide.Go to the next slide and repeat until youve hidden the captions all slides or for any of the videos with captions you wish to hide. Note that if you save the file, the captions will stay hidden when you re-open the presentation.To show the captions again, repeat steps 1-3, but click Show in step 2. If you click Remove during step 2, the captions will be permanently removed from the video. Download the PowerPoint viewer at (http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?displaylang=en&FamilyID=cb9bf144-1076-4615-9951-294eeb832823)1Before you beginIf a yellow security bar appears at the top of the screen in PowerPoint, click Enable Editing. You need PowerPoint 2010 to view this presentation. If you dont have PowerPoint 2010, download the PowerPoint Viewer (see the URL in the notes pane).Download the PowerPoint viewer at (http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?displaylang=en&FamilyID=cb9bf144-1076-4615-9951-294eeb832823)2Microsoft Word 2010 TrainingKeyboard shortcuts[Notes to trainer: This presentation must be viewed in PowerPoint 2010. If you dont have PowerPoint 2010, the videos included in the presentation will not play. If you dont have PowerPoint 2010, download the PowerPoint Viewer to view these files (http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?displaylang=en&FamilyID=cb9bf144%2D1076%2D4615%2D9951%2D294eeb832823).If the yellow security bar appears at the top of the screen in PowerPoint, or if a Codec Unavailable message appears in the video playback window, the presentation might have opened in Protected View. To enable video playback, in the yellow security bar at the top of the PowerPoint window, click Enable Editing.To browse other downloadable [Product Name] training presentations, see the Download Office 2010 training page (http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/powerpoint-help/download-office-2010-training-HA101901726.aspx).For detailed help in customizing this template, see the very last slide. Also, look for additional lesson text in the notes pane of some slides.]3Course contentsOverview: Master the CTRL and ALT keysLesson: Includes 9 instructional moviesQuick Reference CardWord 2010 keyboard shortcuts4Overview: Keyboard shortcuts Word 2010 keyboard shortcutsLearn Word 2010 keyboard shortcuts. Find out how to access almost any button using the ALT key. And, learn handy shortcuts that use the CTRL key.5Course goalsDefine the two kinds of keyboard shortcuts: access keys and key combinations Access tabs, buttons, options, and commands using the ALT keyDirectly perform tasks by using the CTRL key.Perform a variety of tasks using the keyboard: from opening and working with documents to selecting and formatting text.Word 2010 keyboard shortcuts6Introduction (1:40)Word 2010 keyboard shortcutsPoint to the bottom of the video to see the video controls. Drag or point along the progress bar to move forward or go back. Once you get the hang of Word 2010, youll want to find ways to work faster. In other words; get more done in less time with less work, and keyboard shortcuts are a great way to do that. What is a keyboard shortcut? Well its a way to save time by using your keyboard instead of our mouse. How does that help you work faster? Well lets say youre typing on your keyboard and you want to save your work. You could move your hand to the mouse, move the cursor to the ribbon, click Save, and then move your hand back to the keyboard. Or you could save time by keeping your hands on the keyboard and pressing the keyboard shortcut; CTRL and S. There are basically two kinds of shortcut keys: Access keys and Key combinations. With Access keys you can get to things on your screen; like tabs, buttons, and menus that youd normally access using a mouse and they typically start with the ALT key. For example: pressing ALT then F brings up the file menu, pressing P displays print details, and then pressing P again prints your documents. Key combinations access commands directly, they usually start with the CTRL key. For example: you can print your document with key combinations by pressing CTRL and P. In this course well first cover access keys in detail, and then well go on to key combinations. Click Next to begin.[Note to trainer: If you have trouble playing this video, for instance if a Codec Unavailable message appears in the videoplayback window, the presentation might have opened in Protected View.To enable video playback, inthe yellow security bar at the top of the PowerPoint window, click Enable Editing.Note that even with Protected View turned on, video should play correctly in Slide Show view.]7How to use access keys (3:15)Word 2010 keyboard shortcutsPoint to the bottom of the video to see the video controls. Drag or point along the progress bar to move forward or go back. If you want to access tabs, buttons, and menus in Word without using a mouse; you can use access keys and the first step is pressing ALT. When you do that, key tips appear in the ribbon. They show you which key to press to select an item, just like clicking it with the mouse. For example: H selects the Home tab, and 1 selects Bold. What if the key tip has two letters? For example: if you press P to go to the Page Layout tab, youll see that the key tip for Line Numbers is LN; press one, then the other. In this case, a menu opens and we can press the key tip that corresponds to the type of line numbering we want. For example: C, for Continuous. To turn off the numbering press ALT, P, L, N, and then N for None. If youre searching for a command you dont have to worry about getting stuck, because you can always back out by pressing the ESC key. If youre really lost, you can keep pressing ESC and youll eventually exit access key mode. Access keys are easy to use because you dont need to memorize much; you just look at the key tip and press the key. But if thats not easy enough, you can use the arrow keys. First press ALT, the right and left arrow keys move you horizontally, the up key moves you to the quick access toolbar, and the down key takes you to the commands on the ribbon. When you arrive at a button that you would normally click with the mouse, press Enter. Use the arrow keys to move around in galleries and menus, then press ESC to back out, or press Enter to select a command or option. The alternative to arrows is the Tab key. Press ALT, then press Tab to move forward through the items, press Shift and Tab to move backward, and press Enter to select and item. You can use a combination of arrow and tab keys for moving around in the ribbon. For example: use the arrow keys to change tabs, use the Tab key to move around in a tab, then use the arrow keys to change values in a text box. Next, youll see that the Tab key is especially useful when navigating in dialog boxes.[Note to trainer: If you have trouble playing this video, for instance if a Codec Unavailable message appears in the videoplayback window, the presentation might have opened in Protected View.To enable video playback, inthe yellow security bar at the top of the PowerPoint window, click Enable Editing.Note that even with Protected View turned on, video should play correctly in Slide Show view.]8Access keys in dialog boxes (3:16)Word 2010 keyboard shortcutsPoint to the bottom of the video to see the video controls. Drag or point along the progress bar to move forward or go back. Whenever you select an item that ends with an ellipsis, or select one of these little arrows in the ribbon a dialog box opens. There are no key tips in dialog boxes, instead press ALT and look for an underlined letter in the item that you want to access. Then select it by pressing ALT and the letter. If the interline letter approach isnt to your liking, you can navigate using the Tab key. Press Tab to move to the next menu or option, or press Shift-Tab to move back. Youll know an item has the focus if there is a border around it. If you need to switch tabs in a dialog box, press CTRL and the Tab key to go to the next tab, then press Tab to change the focus to the item that you want. If the item is a list; press the up and down arrows to open the list and locate an option, then press Enter to select it. If you need to enter a value use the arrow keys to position the cursor, and the keyboard to: select, delete, or type the text or numbers. If a text box has up and down arrows like this one, you can enter a value with the up and down arrow keys. What about checkboxes? If you come across a checkbox, press the Spacebar to select or clear the option. As with the ribbon, youll find yourself using a combination of methods. For example: you can press ALT and A to select this item, then press the arrow keys to enter a value. Now that were all done with the settings in this dialog box, what do we do? Look at the OK and Cancel buttons; if OK is highlighted in blue, you can press Enter to accept your changes and close the dialog box. If you want to discard your changes; you can Tab to the Cancel button and press Enter, or simply press ESC. Heres another kind of dialog box that youll run into. Press the Tab key to change focus to the navigation pane, then press the up and down arrows to select a section and then Tab to the value that you want to change. Press Enter to select an option, or use the up and down arrows to enter a value. Now you can do almost anything with the access keys, but is that all? Not quite. In the next video: well go through just a few last important tips for using access keys.[Note to trainer: If you have trouble playing this video, for instance if a Codec Unavailable message appears in the videoplayback window, the presentation might have opened in Protected View.To enable video playback, inthe yellow security bar at the top of the PowerPoint window, click Enable Editing.Note that even with Protected View turned on, video should play correctly in Slide Show view.]9F6: Another kind of access key (1:08)Word 2010 keyboard shortcutsPoint to the bottom of the video to see the video controls. Drag or point along the progress bar to move forward or go back. The access keys that you get to by pressing ALT enable you to work with commands on the ribbon and in dialog boxes. But how do you navigate in other areas of Word without a mouse, such as the Status Bar? To access these areas, you use F6. F6 cycles focus from your document, to the status bar, to the ribbon, and then back to the document area. When the focus is on the status bar, you can use the arrows keys and Enter to change the view or zoom levels. When focus is on the ribbon, you can use the access keys to select options and commands, then change focus back to the document. Theres a lot you can do with access keys to save time and get more work done, but you might find it easier to work with the other type of shortcut keys called key combinations. To find out, click Next.[Note to trainer: If you have trouble playing this video, for instance if a Codec Unavailable message appears in the videoplayback window, the presentation might have opened in Protected View.To enable video playback, inthe yellow security bar at the top of the PowerPoint window, click Enable Editing.Note that even with Protected View turned on, video should play correctly in Slide Show view.]10How to use key combinations (3:34)Word 2010 keyboard shortcutsPoint to the bottom of the video to see the video controls. Drag or point along the progress bar to move forward or go back. So weve covered access keys in detail, now its time to learn about the other kind of keyboard shortcut; key combinations. If you want to get to Word commands and options directly without using a mouse or your access keys, you can use key combinations. Key combinations most often start by pressing and holding down the CTRL or Shift and CTRL keys, and then pressing one or two other keys. For example: to save a document you hold down the CTRL key then press S. You can find lists of key combinations in the Quick Reference Card at the end of this course. Theres a key combination for just about anything. From opening a new file, to promoting bulleted lists in a SmartArt graphic. Really the only drawback to key combinations is that you have to remember them, but thats not so bad. First, you only need to remember the key combinations that you use most often. For example: my favorite is CTRL-Z, undo. I dont have to worry about going overboard with a graphic because I can always simply press CTRL-Z to return it to the way it was before. Of course CTRL-S, save, is another favorite. Which brings up another point, you can often remember key combinations by creating mental connections using the shortcut keys themselves. For example: S for save. You can think of X, which is the shortcut key for cut as being a pair of scissors. Of course there is CTRL-P for printing, CTRL-O for opening files, CTRL-F for finding text, and CTRL-C for copying data to the clip board, and of course theres CTRL-V for pasting the contents of the clip board. Well you just have to remember that one, but once you commit your favorite combinations to memory youll find that you can use them in many other office programs and in other programs running on Microsoft Windows. If youre memory needs a little nudge, you can always refer to the list in the Quick Reference Card at the end of this course. And you can also find often find key combinations by holding the mouse cursor over a command and reading the ScreenTip. But the key to remembering key combinations is to start small, start by using one like CTRL-S to save you time. Then as you add more combinations to your repertoire, youll find yourself saving more and more time. Pretty soon youll be adding flourishes to your combinations, like CTRL-Shift-C, this combination copies formatting only. Then you can paste just the formatting by pressing CTRL-Shift-V, or you can do the opposite; copy the text by pressing CTRL-C, then press CTRL-ALT-V to paste the text with different formatting. Again, the goal is not to memorize long lists of key combinations but to start using the combinations that make the most sense for the way you work. If it saves you time, use it! In the next few movies, well explore all kinds of key combinations for working with: document files, moving around in a document, working with text, and other handy shortcuts. Combinations that will make your job easier, faster, and even more fun.[Note to trainer: If you have trouble playing this video, for instance if a Codec Unavailable message appears in the videoplayback window, the presentation might have opened in Protected View.To enable video playback, inthe yellow security bar at the top of the PowerPoint window, click Enable Editing.Note that even with Protected View turned on, video should play correctly in Slide Show view.]11Key combos for working with files (1:55)Word 2010 keyboard shortcutsPoint to the bottom of the video to see the video controls. Drag or point along the progress bar to move forward or go back. The ribbon in Backstage make it easy to find commands and options for opening and closing files, but you can replace a lot of that mouse action with key combinations. Lets start by opening a document. Rather than navigate to the Backstage, simply press the CTRL key and O to access the Open dialog box. Here if you want, you can use the Tab and arrow keys to browse for a file. To create a new document you can go to the Backstage and click New, then browse through the templates on your computer and Office.com. But if you just want to quickly start with a blank document, press CTRL-N. Lets go back to the first document we were working on, heres a handy way to do that: press CTRL and F6. Keep pressing F6 to cycle through all the files that are open until you find the one that you want. As youre editing your document its always a good idea to save your work periodically, and the quickest way to do that is by pressing CTRL-S. Its so easy, theres almost no reason for losing your work. When youre ready to quit for the day, you can quickly close your document by pressing CTRL-W. If you want to exit an instance of Word altogether, press ALT and F4. These two key combinations will be easy to remember because youll find that you can use them in other Office programs, and in Windows, and many other applications. In fact, youll find that the key combinations you use most often are the ones you use in all your programs. And this is certainly the case with key combinations you use for moving around in a document. Click Next to find out more.[Note to trainer: If you have trouble playing this video, for instance if a Codec Unavailable message appears in the videoplayback window, the presentation might have opened in Protected View.To enable video playback, inthe yellow security bar at the top of the PowerPoint window, click Enable Editing.Note that even with Protected View turned on, video should play correctly in Slide Show view.]12Moving around a document (2:42)Word 2010 keyboard shortcutsPoint to the bottom of the video to see the video controls. Drag or point along the progress bar to move forward or go back. The mouse makes it easy to move the cursor around in a document because its sort of like a virtual index finger. But if youre writing, you can often work faster by keeping your hands on the keyboard. You press the arrow keys to move the cursor to the right, to the left, and up, and down one character or line at a time. The End key moves the cursor to the end of the line, and the Home key moves it to the beginning. Press page up, or page down to move up or down one screen. In Word, the amount of movement depends on how much of the document is visible. For example: if half a page is visible; page up and page down scrolls the screen and moves the cursor half a page. These eight keys are all you need to move the cursor anywhere in your document, but if that isnt fast enough you can turbo charge your cursor with the CTRL key. Heres how that works. The left and right arrows move you one character at a time, but if you press the CTRL key the same arrows move you one word at a time. What happens when you press the up or down arrows? Without the CTRL key, you move one line. With the CTRL key, you move an entire paragraph. You can probably guess what happens when you turbo charge the page up and page down keys. Right! You move an entire page. Add the CTRL key to Home and you go to the very top of the document, and CTRL-End takes you to the very end of the document. Here are a couple more key combinations that you might find useful... CTRL-G opens the Go To tab in the Find and Replace dialog box, just type a page number and press Enter. This one is very handy, especially if youre editing a very long document. Press Shift-F5 and you move back to the areas you were previously working on. Word remembers where youve made revisions so you can keep pressing Shift-F5 until you find the revision youre looking for. Now you have the basics for moving around in a document with key combinations. Click Next to find out how to use these keys to select text, and then use another set of key combinations to format the text.[Note to trainer: If you have trouble playing this video, for instance if a Codec Unavailable message appears in the videoplayback window, the presentation might have opened in Protected View.To enable video playback, inthe yellow security bar at the top of the PowerPoint window, click Enable Editing.Note that even with Protected View turned on, video should play correctly in Slide Show view.]13Key combos for working with text (6:30)Word 2010 keyboard shortcutsPoint to the bottom of the video to see the video controls. Drag or point along the progress bar to move forward or go back. When you have a lot of texts to write and edit, you can work faster by using key combinations. Heres some things you can try... Again, you only need to remember the key combinations for the things you do most often like selecting text. In the last movie you saw how to move around in a document using these eight keys and the CTRL key. Well by adding one more key you can use those same moves to select text, and that key is the Shift key. Lets say you just finished this sentence and see words that you want to change. Without moving your hands from the keyboard, press the CTRL and arrow keys to move the cursor to the beginning of the words. Then press Shift and the right arrow key to select text one character at a time. To remove the selection, press the left arrow and the cursor moves back to the beginning of the word. If you want to select more text press Shift and the End key to select to the end of the line, or Shift and the Home key, to select to the beginning of the line, or select multiple lines by pressing Shift and the up or down arrow. What about turbo charging selection with the CTRL key? Press CTRL-Shift and the right or left arrow key to select a whole word at once. Press CTRL-Shift and the Up or Down arrow key to select from the cursor to the beginning or end of a paragraph, and press CTRL-Shift-Home or End to extend the selection to the beginning or end of the document. After you select your text, there are all kinds of things you can do with it. For example: you can replace the old text instantly by simply typing. How about font formatting? Change the font size by pressing CTRL-Shift and the Greater Than, or Less Than sign. Press CTRL-B to make the font bold, press CTRL-U to add underlining, or press CTRL-I to italicize the font. Need to quickly change between upper and lower sentence case? Select your text, and press Shift and F3. Heres an interesting combination: as you know CTRL-Z is undo, well you can also redo a command by pressing CTRL-Y. And you can use CTRL-Y to repeat formatting. For example: Ill press CTRL-B to add a bold typeface, then move down here, select this text, press CTRL-Y, and the bold formatting is repeated. What about changing the font and font size? Simply press CTRL-Shift and F to open the Font dialog box or you can use the Tab and arrow keys, if you want to quickly change formatting. Remember you can type the first few letters of an option to quickly search for it in a long list. You can also press Shift-F10 to access the shortcut menu. This is the same as right-clicking the text with your mouse. Here you can find common formatting commands. Finally you can remove all of your manual formatting in an instant by selecting your text and pressing CTRL and the space bar. There are plenty of key combinations for formatting paragraphs too: press CTRL-E to center a paragraph, press CTRL-R to right align it, press CTRL-L to left align it, and press CTRL-J to justify a paragraph. Heres a handy key combination: CTRL-Shift-8, use this to hide or unhide paragraph marks. If youre doing a lot of work with bulleted lists, try these combinations: use Shift and the arrow keys to select your text, then press CTRL-Shift-L to convert it to a bulleted list. Now you can work with the text as a list. Move the cursor to align, then press ALT-Shift and the Up or Down arrow key to move the line to a different position in the list. Another time saver is Word Styles. Move the cursor to the paragraph you want to format, then press ALT-CTRL-1, 2, or 3 to apply heading styles 1, 2, or 3. To apply the normal style: press CTRL-Shift-N. To access all the styles: press ALT-CTRL-Shift-S to open the Styles task pane. Press F6 to move focus to the Styles pane, then use the Tab and arrow keys to select a style, and press Enter. Notice that as soon as you apply a style, the focus goes directly to the document again. These are just a few of the many key combinations that you can use to work faster with text. With these shortcut keys and the others youve seen in this course, you can do just about anything in Word without the mouse. There are just a few more key combinations that you should know about. Click Next to find out.[Note to trainer: If you have trouble playing this video, for instance if a Codec Unavailable message appears in the videoplayback window, the presentation might have opened in Protected View.To enable video playback, inthe yellow security bar at the top of the PowerPoint window, click Enable Editing.Note that even with Protected View turned on, video should play correctly in Slide Show view.]14Other handy shortcuts (2:09)Word 2010 keyboard shortcutsPoint to the bottom of the video to see the video controls. Drag or point along the progress bar to move forward or go back. Here are a few more handy key combinations you can try. Not sure about spelling? Press F7 to start the Spelling and Grammar checker, select an option and get back to work. Cant find the right word? Type a word thats close, select it, and press Shift-F7, then press F6 to move focus to the Thesaurus, use the Tab and arrows keys to locate a word, then press Shift-F10, arrow down to Insert and press Enter. If youre editing a document, press CTRL-Shift-E to turn on or off track changes, then quickly add a comment to a section by selecting the text and pressing ALT-CTRL-M. as youre typing, you press the Enter key to start a new paragraph. Well what if you want to start a new line, but not a new paragraph? You can insert a line break by pressing Shift and Enter, press CTRL and Enter to quickly insert a page break. Finally, you dont have to break your pace by using the mouse to insert these common symbols: press ALT-CTRL-C to add a copyright symbol, ALT-CTRL-R to add a registered trademark symbol, and ALT-CTRL-T to add a trademark symbol. In this course we have explored many of the most popular keyboard shortcuts and seen how they work. If youre having a hard time remembering them, or you want to learn more take a look at the quick reference card at the end of this course. There youll find lists of shortcut keys that you can print and keep handy as you work.[Note to trainer: If you have trouble playing this video, for instance if a Codec Unavailable message appears in the videoplayback window, the presentation might have opened in Protected View.To enable video playback, inthe yellow security bar at the top of the PowerPoint window, click Enable Editing.Note that even with Protected View turned on, video should play correctly in Slide Show view.]15Quick Reference Card 1Access the ribbonPress ALT. The KeyTips are displayed over each feature that is available in the current view. Press the letter shown in the KeyTip over the tab that you want to use.Continue pressing letters until you press the letter of the command or control that you want to use.Word 2010 keyboard shortcutsQuick Reference Card 2To do thisPressCopyCTRL+CCutCTRL+XPasteCTRL+VCopy formattingCTRL+SHIFT+CPaste formattingCTRL+SHIFT+VPaste specialCTRL+ALT+VUndoCTRL+ZRedoCTRL+YPrintCTRL+PFindCTRL+F SaveCTRL+SWord 2010 keyboard shortcutsCommon key combinationsThis is only a partial list. For a comprehensive list, see the links at the top of this page.Quick Reference Card 3To do thisPressOpenCTRL+ONew documentCTRL+NClose documentCTRL+WExit WordALT+F4Switch to other open documentsCTRL+F6Word 2010 keyboard shortcutsKey combinations for creating files This is only a partial list. For a comprehensive list, see the links at the top of this page.Quick Reference Card 4To movePressOne character to the leftLEFT ARROWOne character to the rightRIGHT ARROWOne word to the leftCTRL+LEFT ARROWOne word to the rightCTRL+RIGHT ARROWOne paragraph upCTRL+UP ARROWOne paragraph downCTRL+DOWN ARROWOne cell to the left (in a table)SHIFT+TABOne cell to the right (in a table)TABUp one lineUP ARROWDown one lineDOWN ARROWTo the end of a lineENDTo the beginning of a lineHOMETo the top of the windowALT+CTRL+PAGE UPTo the end of the windowALT+CTRL+PAGE DOWNUp one screen (scrolling)PAGE UPDown one screen (scrolling)PAGE DOWNTo the end of a documentCTRL+ENDTo the beginning of a documentCTRL+HOMETo a previous revisionSHIFT+F5After opening a document, to the location you were working in when the document was last closedSHIFT+F5Word 2010 keyboard shortcutsKey combinations for moving around a documentThis is only a partial list. For a comprehensive list, see the links at the top of this page.Quick Reference Card 5To do thisPressOpen the Font dialog box to change the font.CTRL+SHIFT+FIncrease the font size.CTRL+SHIFT+>Decrease the font size.CTRL+SHIFT+

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