Using Thinking Maps to Improve Writing Proficiency for English Language Learners

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Using Thinking Maps to Improve Writing Proficiency for English Language Learners. Created By: Patti Burke, Dolly Hathaway, and Amanda Amante. Family. Education. I am from Michigan. This is my 6 th year teaching. Amanda Amante. Married 4 years. Gerber daisies are my favorite!. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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<ul><li><p>Amanda AmanteI am from Michigan.This is my 6th year teaching. Gerber daisies are my favorite!Married 4 yearsNo children, but we have a dog named Bell.Runner!FamilyFriendsEducationTravel</p></li><li><p>sevenothrMoterr Dolly HathawayMother of sevenNorth CarolinaGrandmotherFaithDancerDancerTeacherFamilyEducationChurchFriends</p></li><li><p>Patti BurkePennsylvaniatravelerwife and mothersinger in church choirteacherFamilyChurchFriendsEducation</p></li><li><p>The Hook</p></li><li><p>Establishes a baseline for learning by tapping schemaLowers affective filtersPrompts motivationSets the student up for success</p></li><li><p>Thinking Maps provide a conceptual net for capturing the essential information for any type of learning (Buckner, 2009, p.16).Thinking Maps provide a guided path to organizing information.Thinking Maps allow levels of scaffolding to meet the needs of the writer.</p></li><li><p>The Hook (motivation)The Circle Map (writing ideas/info)The Tool (design for the writing assignment) describing, comparing/contrasting, classifying, whole to part relationships, sequencing, cause and effect, seeing analogies)Differentiation (First, next, last, etc.)</p></li><li><p>To define a concept, a word or an ideaTo brainstorm before writingTo diagnose prior knowledgeTo close a lesson Key words:ContextContext cluesListDefineTell everything you knowIdentifyTell aboutDiscuss</p></li><li><p>This circle map and acrostic poem was a group effort with 1st graders.</p></li><li><p>This was completed by a 1st grade student on his own.</p></li><li><p>Students typed their poems with Kidspiration and were able to add pictures that went along with their poems.</p></li><li><p>At your table, discuss ideas for using circle maps. You will share these with the whole group. </p></li><li><p>Uses only adjectives and adjective phrases for describingUsed for vocabulary development and inferential thinkingKey words:DescribeUse vivid languageAttributesCharacteristicsPropertiesAdjectivesQualities</p></li><li><p>Used for comparing and contrastingKey Words:Compare/ContrastDiscuss similarities/differenceDistinguish betweenDifferentiate</p></li><li><p>Form a group of three to four people.In your group, think of ways you can use double bubble maps to support writing.You will have five minutes before you share your ideas.</p></li><li><p>Used for classifyingKey words:ClassifySortGroupCategorizeTypes/Kinds ofList and elaborateTaxonomyGive details</p></li><li><p>Student sample. Students created tree maps with words and illustrations.</p></li><li><p>Form a group of three to four people.In your group, think of ways you can use a tree map to support writing.You will have five minutes before you share your ideas.</p></li><li><p>Use to sequence and orderKey Words:Sequence, put in orderRecount/retellWhat happens nextCyclesPatternsProcessesChangeSolve multi-step problems</p></li><li><p>Form a group of three to four people.In your group, think of ways you can use flow maps to support writing.You will have five minutes before you share your ideas.</p></li><li><p>Shows cause and effectSupports the reasons that cause the writer to have this opinionDepicts a position or opinionServes as a plan for writingKey Words:Causes and effectsPredict what would happen ifChangeIdentify motivesResults, outcomes, benefitsWhy</p></li><li><p>Form a group of three to four people.In your group, think of ways you can use multi-flow maps to support writing.You will have five minutes before you share your ideas.</p></li><li><p>Use to show part to whole relationshipsCan act as a checklistKey words:Parts ofTake apartShow structurePhysical components</p></li><li><p>La hamburguesaEl panLa hamburguesa/ la carneEl quesoEl tomateLa lechugaLa cebolla</p></li><li><p> Jan. 23, 2011Dear Sally, I am having a birthday party and would really like you to come! It will be Friday, January 28th at my house. I live at 113 Holland Ave. Please let me know if you can come!Your friend,Emily Jan. 23, 2001 Dear Sally,I am having a birthday party and would really like you to come! It will be Friday, January 28th at my house. I live at 113 Holland Ave. Please let me know if you can come!Your FriendEmilyInvitationHeadingGreetingBodyClosingSignature</p></li><li><p>Seeing analogiesKey words:Identify the common relationshipGuess the ruleInterpret symbolsRatioSimileMetaphorAllegory</p></li><li><p>Is the word La pizza La hamburguesaEl perro calienteasas</p></li><li><p>Form a group of three to four people.In your group, think of ways you can use brace and bridge maps to support writing.You will have five minutes before you share your ideas.</p></li><li><p>Buckner, J. (2009). Path to proficiency for English language learners. Cary, NC: Thinking Maps.</p><p>*After we present our circle maps, have participants make their own circle maps to share with a partner.*Thinking Maps fall into the category of graphic organizers, but their uses go beyond the typical uses of graphic organizers. With practice, students learn which map to use for which specific purpose. Thinking Maps help students organize their what they know and think. Today we will look at ways we have used Thinking Maps in our classrooms. *This is an example of a 1st grader who created a circle map with things about her sister. She then used this information to write an acrostic poem about her and her sister and the things they like to do together.***2nd grader created this poem about a city. Students were able to use the information learned throughout the City unit and things from our circle map. We had to work on syllabification and examples of Haiku poems. Students looked at an example, then we created one together, and then they were able to write their own.**In this example, second grade students brainstormed what they knew about Chinese New Year (in the circle map on the right). After viewing a story about Chinese New Year on Bookflix, students added to their circle map using a different color. They also crossed out any information that was incorrect. The second circle map (on the left) shows how they celebrate New Years. The circle maps were the first step in writing compare and contrast paragraphs.The next step was moving the information from the circle maps to the double bubble map. The students followed the guidelines and wrote the similarities in the center and the differences in the outer circles. Then, the students referred to paragraph frames that guided them in composing a paragraph that compares and a paragraph that contrasts. I provided different levels of scaffolding via the paragraph frames to differentiate. At the bottom of the photo, you can see the topic of the rubric that students used to evaluate their writing. Students were able to take new vocabulary and classify them as being good or bad weather. We then took these classifications and made complete weather sentences with Sometimes it is_________ and I like it when it is_____________.**My fourth grade students created this flow map about a story. Prior to making the flow map, students wrote everything they remembered about the story in a circle map. Then we worked together to decide which events were significant to the plot. After that, we ordered the events in the flow map. Before we transformed the flow map into a summary, I gave the students a paragraph frame for the introductory paragraph. They filled in the correct information about the main characters and problem. Then the students added sequencing words to the flow map to write the summary.This is an example of how you can use a flow map with Kindergarten or first grade students. You can also allow older students with lower L2 proficiency to use labeled drawings in a flow map. By providing a model or a paragraph frame, students will be able to write a summary.The brace map is for breaking a whole unit into smaller parts. (Whole to parts)When dealing with writing, the brace map is a little bit more difficult to include. May work well with math and writing out solutions with including the whole and its parts.To help make writing more interesting allow your students to make it about themselves.The example you will see next dealt with a food unit. This was with newcomers and dealt with foods such as sandwiches, pizza, salad, (the wholes) and then what is in each of those (the parts). The students were able to build on this and share how they like each of these things with writing and drawing about it.The brace map is for breaking a whole unit into smaller parts. (Whole to parts)When dealing with writing, the brace map is a little bit more difficult to include. May work well with math and writing out solutions with including the whole and its parts.To help make writing more interesting allow your students to make it about themselves.The example you will see next dealt with a food unit. This was with newcomers and dealt with foods such as sandwiches, pizza, salad, (the wholes) and then what is in each of those (the parts). The students were able to build on this and share how they like each of these things with writing and drawing about it.</p><p>This example allows you to break apart the components of a whole. For this we talked about different foods like hamburgers, pizza, salad, etc. and how each student likes those things. Students were able to create a brace map and then draw a picture of their food and write about how they like it. *A brace map can be used to provide a checklist for what the students need to include in their writing. *This is an example of a bridge map using pictures and Spanish. You could use another bridge map below and have the words written in English also. Or show English to Spanish instead of a picture. *1ST grade students drew pictures and wrote words that had to do with each season first. Then we created a bridge map that stated what the weather was like during their favorite season. Students wrote a complete sentence then describing the weather and telling us something they liked to do in that season. She stated The weather is cold in the winter we can play in the snow and we can make a snowball and snowman.***</p></li></ul>

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