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The SPICE project Expected seismic simulation data Results of ORFEUS/SPICE Meeting May 7, 2004

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S eismic wave P ropagation and I maging in C omplex media: a E uropean network Suggestions for synthetic data storage. H., Igel, J. Wassermann, M. Stupazzini (Munich) J.-P. Vilotte (IPG Paris) B. Dost, T. Van Eck (ORFEUS). The SPICE project Expected seismic simulation data - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Text of The SPICE project Expected seismic simulation data Results of ORFEUS/SPICE Meeting May 7, 2004

  • Seismic wave Propagation and Imaging in Complex media: a European network

    Suggestions for synthetic data storageThe SPICE project

    Expected seismic simulation data

    Results of ORFEUS/SPICE Meeting May 7, 2004

    Examples

    H., Igel, J. Wassermann, M. Stupazzini (Munich)J.-P. Vilotte (IPG Paris)B. Dost, T. Van Eck (ORFEUS)

  • Seismic wave Propagation In Complex media: a European networkMarie Curie Research Training network in the 6th Framework Programme (Coordination: Munich seismology)

    14 institutions (INGV Rome, IPG, ENS Paris, Oxford, Utrecht, Munich, Bratislava, Prague, Oslo, Dublin, Naples, Hamburg, Trieste, Zurich)

    14 postdocs and 14 PhDs, 4-year project (start 2004)

    Training workshops, development of training material

    Four task groups in the fields of (1) Global seismology, (2) volcano seismology and reservoir seismics, (3) earthquake physics and (4) digital library

  • Expected simulation data:Volcano seismologyExample: Merapi volcano, IndonesiaFrom: Ripperger, Igel, Wassermann, 2004

  • Expected simulation data:Dynamic ruptureFrom: Brietzke and Ben-Zion, 2004Example: Rupture at material interfaces

  • Expected simulation data:Earthquake scenariosRoermond earthquake M5.9, 1992Cologne basin Germany

  • Expected simulation data: Global seismology

  • ORFEUS-SPICE Meeting May 7, 2004 Results 1/2SEED/miniSEED seems to be the most appropriate synthetic data format for compatibility with the observational IT infrastructure

    We defined three synthetic data types:

    Type 1: Synthetic data (seismograms) that have been calculated for specific past earthquakes and are available for existing seismometer locations. These synthetic data should be stored with the corresponding UTC timing for the pre-determined origin time. Type 2: Synthetic data (seismograms) for virtual earthquakes calculated for virtual networks. This could correspond to potential earthquake scenarios in a particular region and the virtual network could consist of the 2-D surface grid points (e.g. 2-D array) where synthetic seismograms have been calculated.

    Type 3: Synthetic seismogram data (i.e. complete wave fields) that are available for a 3D volume (e.g. sedimentary basin, whole Earth).

  • ORFEUS-SPICE Meeting May 7, 2004 Results 2/2Additional header information for Synthetic data types (Metadata) must include at least:

    a pointer to information on the model structurethe numerical method employedsimulation information (e.g. valid frequency range of simulation, physical approximations, etc.)earthquake source informationidentification (software author, date of data generation, etc.)

  • Examples: Data Type 1Observations (X) and Synthetics ()If you read event data, a flag () indicates that synthetics are available

  • Examples: Data Type 1Observations (X) and Synthetics ()

  • Examples: Data Type 2virtual earthquake, virtual array

  • Necessary developmentsInternational working group and schedule for implementation

    Multi-national agreement on synthetic data format

    Provision for multi-component (>3C) data (e.g. strains, rotations, atmospheric parameters)

    Coordinated software development for data access, visualization etc.

    Development of a test data base accessible to the community with feed-back options

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