Squash'd

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  • 1. Squashd A conceptual design byReed Matheny and Keith McDaniel Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu Design Challenge To strengthen the habit of eatingvegetables among university students Time Limit: 5 hours

2. Squashd

  • Persuasive Purpose
    • To strengthen the habit of eating vegetables among university students through competition.

Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu

  • Industrial Design

3. User Description

    • Attends and lives on a University campus.
    • Eats the majority of their meals in a dining hall.
    • Is motivated to eat vegetables, but has not made it a regular habit.
    • Each of the users know the other users, they have established social connections

Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu 4. The Story of Squashd and Kara Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu She receives an email on her smartphone that night asking her about her vegetable consumption. Kara answers the two simple questions and is ready to send the form off in minutes. The email has a link to the leaderboard Karas friend Becca is the current leader in her group because shes had 4 vegetarian meals and 12 different vegetables in the last two days! This motivates Kara to keep up with her goals. Kara is a Stanford undergraduate trying to change her eating habits for the better. She wants to improve her fitness and lessen her environmental impact by eating more vegetables so she signs up for a new service called Squashd that two of her friends already use. She receives an HTML email outlining the program: every night a simple email form will be sent to her smartphone asking her for the number of vegetarian meals she ate that day, as well as the number of different vegetables she ate throughout the day. Kara starts off the nextday (her first in the program) feeling confident. She seeks out vegetarian meals at her dining hall for breakfast and lunch, eating 7 different kinds of vegetables in the process. Kara is surprised at how easily she can find all of these vegetables at her dining hall now that shes actively looking for them. After 4 days with Squashd Kara is the leader in her friend group, boosting her confidence and strengthening the long-neglected habit of actively seeking vegetables for every meal. Shes on her way to a stronger habit, a healthier diet and a better planet. 5. Prototype of Squashd email Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu 6. Features/Functionality

    • Tracks the # of meals that are vegetarian, and the number of vegetables in each meal.
      • A customized HTML email is sent out to participants, allowing them to enter their stats in an easy way.
      • The system adds up their score.
    • Triggers the choice to eat vegetables
      • The daily email serves as a trigger for the behavior
    • Motivates through competition, using the tracking information and a scoring system.
      • Each vegetarian meal is 2 points
      • Each vegetable that you eat in a meal is 1 point

Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu 7. Theoretical Justifications

    • No information
      • Emphasis on information absorption is taxing and very often not effective
    • Competition is key
      • Motivation by peers is a very effective tool
      • Peers can act as an additional trigger, and are often more well timed.
    • Personalized triggers are more effective
      • A generalized trigger can easily be ignored, but a personal trigger is more effective
    • Emphasis on increasing the behavior
      • Participants are already eating vegetables, and emphasizing apurple spanbehavior will be most effective.
    • Vegetarian is easier
      • Putting the emphasis on vegetarianism is easier for participants to track.

Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu 8. Plan for User Study

    • Duration: 10 days
    • Participants: 10 students from the Chi Theta ChiCo-op
    • Protocol:
      • Gather information on participants current vegetable habits
      • Explain the details of the intervention, including the scoring system and leader board
      • Send each participant the tracking email at 9pm daily
      • Compile scores and update the leader board by 12pm the following day
  • Conclusion:
      • Debrief participants on how/if their habits have changed.

Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu 9. Shortcomings of Design

    • Vegetarian meals are not explicitly concentrated on vegetables, but rather anti-meat.
    • Trigger is not timed optimally
    • This is only designed to be used fully by smart phone users

Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu 10. Expansion - What else is possible?

    • Other form factors or ID possibilities
      • Web
      • Mobile
    • Other features and interactions
      • Geo-based meal suggestions
      • Additional tracking metrics

Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu 11. Next Steps in Design Process

    • Add additional scoring criteria, expanding possibilities to eat vegetables and score points
    • Add additional interaction methods: SMS, web, mobile, etc.

Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu 12. Summary

    • Fostering competition among university students will provide both motivation and trigger.
    • Tracking and scoring is easy, and done through a single HTML-enabled email each day.
    • The intervention aims to create apurple spanbehavior, increasing what participants are already done some of the time.

Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu