ShopNotes Issue 07

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Shop-Built Workbench

.Raised Panel Routing Jig

I l l l l p = ssue 7EDITOR

January 1993Donald B. Pesehke

EXSCUTIVE EDITOR Douglas L. HicksMANACINC EDITOR ISSOCI~TE EDITOR ASSISTANTEDITOR c o N m l e u n n c EDITORCRUTEVE DIRECTOR

Terry J. Strohman Richard S. Peters

T i m RobertsonPhillip A. TottenTed Kralieek Gary Christensen

ART DIRECTOR SENIOR I L L U M T O R

K~l'tS c h ~ l t 2Roger Reiland

Iwusmrrons Will Niskanen

Mark HigdonPHOTOGRAPHER DESICW DIRECTOR SENIOR DESIGNER DESlCNEa

Crayola England Ken Munkel

Jan Hale SveeKent Welsh Steve Curtis

SHOP YLN~CER

omcuunow

Cimdatim h d a r : LizBredem-Su6srriptzOn Mamger: PhyULF Jessen Cir&tim Analyst Rod Cain- Newsstand Sales: Kent A BneMonWBLISHIm SUIVICES

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Aasoeiola Edito?:Gordon C. G a p e . S7 Graphic D e s i p : Robert H. WhitmerCOR-TEIERYICEI

ow many times have you heard, "that's the way it has always been done." All to often woodworkers get "bogged down" thinking about the way things should be done, and we don't think about the way things could be done. WORKBENCH. A perfect example of this is the Workbench featured in this issue. Paditionally the top of a workbench is glued up kom several pieces to form a large, thick slab. This requires a large amount of wood (which can be expensive). And a good deal of time and effort. What we wanted was the look of a traditional bench without the work. Kent Welsh (our Designer) came up with a different approach. The top of the bench starts with a plywood foundation. Then thin hardwood strips are glued on. Less wood, less effort. PUBLISHER'S STATEMENT. You've probably noticed that a good portion of

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this page is taken up by a rather official looking document. It's called a Publisher's Statement. Once a year the Post Office requires us to print this. Basically it lets everyone know how many issues are printed, and how they're distributed. Now, I'll admit that I sometimes loose track of time, but when Phyllis Jessen (our Subscription Manager) reminded me to included the Publisher's Statement in this issue, I was shocked. Having to fill out the the Publisher's Statement was like getting a birthday card. It reminded me that one year had passed since ShopNotes was '%om." The past year has been very exciting (and very husy) for all of us. The response to ShopNotes has been better than we hoped. We now have over 165,000 paid subscribers. I want to thank all of you for helping us through the first year. And to let you know that we have lots of great pro-

Conhu1lw:Paul E. Gray. Aecm%biwLinda O' Rourke Bookkeeping: Julianne Spears -Z*fo. Sewices Manager. Joy- Moore Netwnrk Admi*: Douglas M. Lidster Administrative As&.: Cheryl Scott, Jdja Fish Receptimist Jeanne Johnson Bldg. M&t:Ken G a t h

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Marketing Di7ector. Robert Muny .ArtD(rector Cindy Jackon Customer Sewice MF: Laura MeNelly Prqled Supplies: Linda Jones .Technical Supp&:JeffJanes .Systems aparator: Linda Momow nReeeptionist Keri LeaCUSTOYU IERVlCE

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STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP, MANAGEMENT AND CIRCULATION (Requjred by 39 U.S.C. 3685) 1. Title of Publication: ShapNotes. la. Publication No.: 10629696.2.Date of Filing: September 24.1992.3.Freauencvafissue: Bimonthlv. 3a. No. ofissues~ublishedannuailv: 6 (six). 3b.Annual subscription pri&: $16.95.4.Complete mkingaddress af&own M e e ofpubkcatim: 2200 Grand Avenue, Des Moines, (Polk County), Iowa 50312~5306. 5. Complete miling address of the

Managing Editor: Terry J. Stmhman, 2200 Grand Avenue, Des Moines, Iowa 50312.7. owner;

S d e Supemisor Jennie Enos = Customer Sovice Rep7esentative.s Jennifer Murphy, Joy Johnson, Sara Kono, Ami Blanshan, AnnaCox, Chris LoSWIPPlNG m P M Y E H T

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on the raised panel. To @ border create theangle, the bottomedge of the block is beveled before gluing and screwing it to the base, see Fig. 2a. Then the rods are epoxied in the holes. s L m m G PLATFORM. With the rods in place, the next step is to add a sliding platform. The platfonn carries the router back and forth on the guide rods to increase the width of the border. It consists of three parts: a mounting plate, a pair of rails, and a finger guard, see Figs. 3 and 6. MOUNTING PLATE. The moU%tivqplate (D) is a piece of V4" Masonite that replaces the original base of the router, see Fig. 3. (I used the original base as a template to locate the mounting holes and the opening for the bit.) WS. After marking and drilling the holes, a pair of hardwood rails (E) is added, see Fig. 3. Holes at each end of the rails fit over the guide rods and allow the platform to slide back and forth. To keep the platformhm binding, the holes need to align with the guide rods and with each other. To do this, I taped the rails together with double-sided tape and thencentered the holes 71ht'apart, see Fig. 4. Note. Sand these holes lightly so the rails slide easily. Before attaching the rails, there's one more thing to do. And that's to cut a kerf at each end of om rail, see Fig. 5a. Later, thisRAISE BLADE TO MAXIMUM HEIGHT

ROUTER ON MOUNTING PLATE TO TRANSFER SCREW HOLES AND

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rail a d s as part of a clamping sys- the bolts, the kerfed ends of the tem that locks the platform in rail pinch against the guide rods place. After cutting the kerfs, the and lock the platform in place. FINGER GUARD. The last step rails are glued and screwed to the is to add a finger guard. The mounting plate, refer to Fig. 3. CLAMP. NOW the clamp can he guard is a piece of V4" plexiglas completed. What makes the clamp that's screwed loosely to the h n t work is two carriage bolts that rail, see Fig. 6. Two slotsand abevpass through holes drilled in the eled bottomcornerallowthe guard ends of the kerfed rail, see Fig. to "rideup"ontop of the workpiece 3a. By tightening wing nuts on as it's passed under the muter.

Slip a thin piece of wood in the kerf to prevent the drill bit from binding.

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Raised PanelsRouting a n arqled bordel- around the edges of a panel creates a '%aised"field in the centerOne way to turn an ordinary projeet into something specialis with a raised panel door or drawer. Making these panels is simple using a router and the raised panel jig shown on page 4.RABBET Since most panels are surrounded by a frame, the first step is to fit the panel to the h e . This requires rabbeting the edges on both sides of the panel (I use a hand-held muter), see Step 1.The

rahhets fonn a tongue that fits into a groove in the h e . Before routing the angled border of the panel, there are two things to consider: grain direction and feed direction.

Raised Panels Step-by-step

ROUT RABBET ON BOTH SIDES OF PANEL TO FORM TONGUE TONGUE -\FRAME

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A Step 1: Using a ?a8"rabbetingbit, a rabbet is routed around the edges of the panel on both sides.

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Step 2: After mounting the routeron theslidingplatform, position the platform and adjust the

depth of cut so the edge of the bit is at the shoulder of the rabbet. Then clamp the platform in place.

A Step 3: Make the first pass bysliding the panel from left to right Then complete the border by

making a series of passes, mov- A Step 4: Now sand the border ing the slidingplatformin V4"incre- smooth and square up the shoulments between each pass. der with a beveled sanding block.

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ShopNotes

NO.7

GRAIN DIRECWN. To reduce the amount of chi~out. the ends (or end grain) of the panel are routed first. Then, any chipout can be cleaned up by routing the sides (or edge grain). F E DIRECTION. ~ Whether you're muting ends or sides, each pass is made by sliding the panel Prom left to right. This way, the clockwise rotation of the bit pulls the panel against the fence. SET-UP. Now you're ready to "raise" the panel. After mounting the muterto the slidingplatfonn, the shoulder of the rabbet is used as a guide to set up the jig, see Step 2 on page 6. 'Rmrra ox BORDER. When the first pass is completedaround the entire vanel. the width of the border can be increased. To do this, slide the platform up the guide rods, tightenthe clamp,andmake another pass around each edge. Then just repeat the process until the border is the desired width, see Step 3 on page 6.

Curved PanelsI RUB BLOCK(FX

dSCREW DOWEL IN HOLE

REMOVE FENCE

J/4-DIA. DOWEL

A Step 1 : After remov~ngthe The dowelfence, ~nstalla short length of %'-dla dowel as a rub block.'

IS screwed in a stopped hole that3 centered on the dado in the base.

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GURNED RAISED PANELSThe beauty ofthisraisedpaneljig is it can also be used to rout noved panels. RUB BLOCK. Qince the curved edge doesn't conform t o the straight line of the fence, the fence is replaced with a ''rub block," see Step 1.(I used a short piece of 3A"-dia. dowel.) The dowel is screwed in a hole that's centered on the dado in the base. ROUT CURVED END. With the rub block in place, the curved end of t