SCIENTIFICALLY GEOMETRICALLY ¢« * ¢« . ... 1s¢â€‍¢*bible lm* heaven?**^ scientifically geometrically ¢«

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  • # 'Jr ‘.». m* W W

    f i R r A / ? * X i X v n S■V

    1S™*BIBLE lm* HEAVEN?**̂

    SCIENTIFICALLY

    GEOMETRICALLY « * « DEMONSTRATED.

    m m s m

    IS thbEMT a GLOBE ?

  • IS T H E

    B IB L E FR0M HEAVEN? IS T H E

    EARTH A GLOBE ? I N T W O R X R T S

    DOES MODERN SCIENCE AND ThJE BIBLE fIGREE ?

    -ALSO- AN ACCURATE CHRONOLOGY OF

    ALL PAST TIME, CONTAINING A

    CLASSIFICATION OF ALL THE ECLIPSES FROM C R E A T I O N .

    AUTHENTICATED' BY THE BRITISH ASTRONOMICAL ASSOCIATION

    tG F LONPONy -ENGLAND. - -

    t lu ■' - t- I ilL S E C O N D ' E D I T I O N .

    REVISED AND E ^ L A R G ^ b BV " “

    - f i .1 _ .E 2 i.” o - £ , E - & . s o i s r . BOOK We-. ........ ............

    T>1 LRIISHFIY -RV

    T h e B u f f a l o E l e c t r o t y p e a n d E n g r a v in g C o . , BUFFALO, N. Y ., U. S. A.

  • C o p y r i g h t , 18 9 0 .

    By ALEX. GLEASON. .

    R e - c o p y r i g h t e d a n d R e - w r i t t e n ,

    R e v i s e d a n d E n l a r g e d , 1 8 9 3 .

    /

  • i

    j XL

    r [~\0 that class of citizens who are

    . known as “ Honest Skeptics,”

    and lovers of “ demonstrated truth,”

    is this revised volume dedicated by the

    Author.

    We assign no m an to oblivion because of a \

    difference of opinion.

    Let God and His Works be true, though

    they prove all men false.

    TXT

    *

  • A

    i

  • HO W many extraordinary changes have w e witnessed in physical, as well as political and scientifical sciences, and in opinions, as also in the individuals w ho have borne a conspicuous, aind deservedly honored part, in the affairs of the civilized world during the memory of the pioneers o f the present generation ! How important have been the results of the numberless voyages of discovery, revolutions of society, of states and.the wars, which have excited an intense interest during that period: an interest which has been the more constantly kept up, as the facility of communication between all the branches of the great human family, which seems,, at the same time, to have gone on increasing in proportion to the multitude of events and circumstances; the manifest evidence of which truths are more strange, interesting, and of far more importance to man, than fiction. Anciently, centuries would elapse ere the most important facts could pass the barriers which an imperfect knowledge of the navigation of the ocean caused, or that the diversity o f languages be regained, which the Lord in His wisdom confounded at the Tow er of Babel, in the yejir 2217 A. M, or 1782 B. C.

  • VI FROM THE PUBLISHERS.

    W e can but call the inquiring mind to the rapid strides of art and knowledge of every branch. • For instance: the charac­ ters used in arithmetic, brought into Europe by the Saracens 991 A. D. Algebra introduced into Europe; by the same nationality in 1412 A. D.

    The age of Arabic learning lasted about 500 years, and was coeval with the darkest period of the history of Europe.

    But., as westward, the sun of science bore its sway, In the Bast, he closes the drama of their day.

    In comparison with the present state of the world, how small was the theater on which the gods of Grecian fable and the heroes of Grecian history performed their parts in » that interesting d ram a! During the period of Roman history, it is true, the field of civilization had become much more en­ larged; but, in our ow n times, it has extended unto the remotest bounds of the inhabitable earth. In view of these considerations, it becomes necessary for every well informed man, w ho Would keep his relative place during this advance stage of society, to possess himself of all means of knowledge, which might have been• dispensed with in former periods; the knowledge of the different sciences and arts, closely con­ nected as they ever have been, having now more common bonds of union than in the preceding ages.

    "M any shall run to and fro, and knowledge shall be in­ creased. " W hether this running to and fro refers to the rapid and numerous means of transportation of the people from place to place, or the increase of knowledge in the sciences, or the increase of knowledge in reference to those things spoken to the Prophet Daniel (as some people think, which he was commanded to close up " a n d seal even to the time of the end”); in either case, the fulfilment is manifest. Says an eminent writer in quoting the Scientific American:

  • FROM THE PUBLISHERS. VII

    “ W ithin the last fifty years more advancement has been made in all scientific attainments, and more progress in all that tends \ to domestic comfort, the rapid transaction of business among men, and the transmission of intelligence from one to another, than all that was done for three thousand years previous put together. ” ,

    In union there is strength, providing always, that in that union there is harmony.

    The publishers of this w ork have not united their efforts for the purpose of promulgating the doctrinal tenets of any theological denomination, or opinions of any set of m e n ; but for the primary purpose of giving to the public, such demon­ strated facts, as science from a critical Geodetic and Astro­ nomical standpoint may reveal. Upon the religious views of denominations w e make no attack, but the author and com­ piler is supposed to give only facts, such as bring to light the infallible W ord of God as being in harmony with the science of nature, and there leave every man to choose for himself. The writer of this work has spent much time and means in making research, in the scientific archives of other countries, as well as his ow n practical exertions to arrive at facts concerning those things which the masses take for granted, and which things are clung tenaciously to. by some persons w ho regard a popular error o f more value than an unpopular truth.

    A great and lasting benefit to the readers of this w ork will be derived in the study of the chronological work as given in this book and authenticated by the “ British Chronological and Astronomical Association,” of London, England. The work consists of a classification of “ All Past T im e ” by cycles of eclipses and transits, from creation to the present date. These are so tabulated and made so plain, that the boy that can read and comprehend the multiplication, table can give the date of

  • \

    VIII f r o m t h e p u b l is h e r s . ' , ,

    \ every eclipse, Lunar or Solar, that has transpired since the world b eg an ; also, all future, on the* same principle; and all of 1 this with the simple knowledge of the first or lower branches of common arithmetic.

    W ith these considerations w e commend this work to the lovers of truth and reform.

    PUBLISHERS.

    \

  • PREFACE.

    “ Why I Believe as I Do,” is the Result of Truth Demonstrated.

    NO one will deny that by making practical experiments, , and collecting undeniable facts, arranging them logically, and observing the results, will give the investigator the greatest satisfaction. “ An hypothesis,” says Webster, “ is a supposi­ tion, a proposition, or principle which is supposed, or taken for granted, in order to draw a,conclusion or inference for proof of the point in question—something not proven, but as­ sumed for the purpose of argum ent.” A system* or theory imagined or assumed to account for known facts or phenom­ ena. This latter method often leads the truth seeker to sad results and severe disappointments. (The writer speaks from experience in this case.) Therefore, it is the purpose of this work to offer such facts as have been demonstrated, and to that extent that they are beyond a doubt, or cite the reader to the most simple means of demonstrating the propositions. W hilst our purpose is not for the sake of “ argum ent,” but for sake of the truth, w e propose not to exclude all hypothesis, but ask the candid investigator and searcher for truth to give demonstrated and axiomatical (self-evident) facts the pref­ erence.

    Again, it cannot be reasonably expected that within the province o f this small work, that the writer will explain all .the phenomena that may arise to the thinking mind, or meet the

  • \

    I . ' X PREFACE.

    fancied objections of the caviller. Therefore w e will, in some instances, let one demonstrated fa c t on the point or prime proposition stand as settled, until such a time as the seemingly and know n phenomenal objection can be removed or explained by sonrie other cause. As “ truth is no part of a lie,” w e may rest assured that the latter must, sooner or later, die, while the former is immortal. Therefore, w e must conclude, and in­ sist, that “ One Demonstrated Fact" is no less the Truth, though there may be a hundred phenomenal existences appar­ ently against it.

    “ W h a t is T r u t h ? ” “ W h e r e a n d W h a t is t h e S t a n d ­

    a r d ?” This is to be the first and prime interrogation of this work. If there is no standard, then each and every man is left to the merciless winds of doctrine, blown by every street vender or theological quack. ]There is no book or platform suffi­ cient to contain all of God’s truth; the “ five senses” are ours to exercise and improve, and while we would not advise inde­ pendence of spirit, l