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  • FACULTY OF SCIENCE

    SCHOOL OF OPTOMETRY AND VISION SCIENCE

    OPTM3131

    Ocular Disease 3A

    SEMESTER 1 2015

  • 1

    Table of Contents

    1. Information about the Course ..................................................................................................... 2

    2. Staff Involved in the Course ....................................................................................................... 2

    3. Course Details ............................................................................................................................ 3

    4. Rationale and Strategies Underpinning the Course ................................................................... 4

    5. Course Schedule ........................................................................................................................ 5

    6. Assessment Tasks and Feedback ............................................................................................. 6

    7. Additional Resources and Support ............................................................................................. 7

    8. Required Equipment, Training and Enabling Skills .................................................................... 8

    9. Course Evaluation and Development ......................................................................................... 9

    10. Administration Matters ............................................................................................................ 10

    11. UNSW Academic Honesty and Plagiarism ............................................................................ 13

  • 2

    Faculty of Science - Course Outline

    1. Information about the Course NB: Some of this information is available on the UNSW Handbook

    1

    Year of Delivery 2015

    Course Code OPTM3131

    Course Name Ocular Diseases 3A

    Academic Unit School of Optometry and Vision Science

    Level of Course 3 UG Course

    Units of Credit 6UOC

    Session(s) Offered Semester 1

    Assumed Knowledge, Prerequisites or Co-requisites

    Prerequisites: VISN 2231, OPTM2211, PHPH2201 Co-requisites: VISN3111,OPTM3111

    Hours per Week 4/5 hours per week (face to face)

    Number of Weeks 12 weeks

    Commencement Date Week 2 March 9

    th 2014

    Summary of Course Structure (for details see 'Course Schedule') Component HPW Time Day Location

    Lectures 5

    Lecture 1 1 11 12 pm Mon RMT

    Lecture 2 2 11 1 pm Tue RMT

    Lecture 3 2 2 4 pm Wed *(Wed 22 April)

    RMT *(OMB G31)

    Practicals (Wk 6, 8, 11) 2

    Practical 1 See schedule Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu OMB LG21 Practical 1

    Practical 2 See schedule Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu OMB LG21 Practical 2

    Practical 3 See schedule Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu OMB LG21 Practical 3

    TOTAL

    2. Staff Involved in the Course

    Staff Role Name Contact Details Consultation Times

    Course Convenor Jerome Ozkan j.ozkan@unsw.edu.au During lectures or email for appointment

    Additional Teaching Staff

    Lecturers & Facilitators

    Tutors & Demonstrators

    Technical & Laboratory Staff

    Other Support Staff

    1 UNSW Online Handbook: http://www.handbook.unsw.edu.au

    http://www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/http://www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/http://www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/

  • 3

    3. Course Details

    Course Description

    2

    (Handbook Entry)

    Diseases of the eyelids and ocular adnexa, orbit, conjunctiva, lacrimal system, cornea and sclera, anterior uvea, vitreous, and lens. Case analysis.

    Course Aims

    3

    To introduce students to the diagnosis and optometric management of diseases of the anterior eye, ocular adnexa, and lacrimal system.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    4

    Students are expected to demonstrate understanding and competence in specific areas described in the Optometrists Association Australia Universal Entry-Level Competency (ELC) and Therapeutic Competency (TC) Standards for the profession of Optometry 2008. By the end of this course, you will be able to: 1. Differentially diagnose anterior eye disease on the basis of the symptoms and signs of the condition (ELC and TC 3.8, 4.1, 4.2, 5.1) 2. Differentiate normal from abnormal anterior eye appearance (ELC and TC 1.9, 3.8, 4.1) 3. Describe diagnostic tools commonly used in anterior eye examination including indications for use and interpretation of results (ELC and TC 1.1, 2.4, 5.5) 4. Locate and critically evaluate high quality current information on anterior eye disease and its management (ELC and TC 1.1) 5. Describe and discuss general aspects of the management / treatment of anterior eye disease based on the latest scientific evidence and optometrys role in a multidisciplinary team of treating practitioners (ELC and TC 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 3.3, 5.1, 5.9) 6. Communicate orally and in a written fashion to patients and allied health professionals in a precise and informative way (ELC and TC 1.2, 1,3, 1.4, 1.5, 5.9) 7. Describe the epidemiology (incidence, prevalence, risk factors) of anterior eye diseases 8. Integrate knowledge gained in other optometry courses (Optometry 2A & B) and the current

    course (OPTM3131)

    Graduate Attributes Developed in this Course

    5

    Science Graduate Attributes

    5

    Select the level of

    FOCUS 0 = NO FOCUS

    1 = MINIMAL 2 = MINOR 3 = MAJOR

    Activities / Assessment

    Research, inquiry and analytical thinking abilities

    3

    Through lectures and practical classes, you will develop competence and discipline specific knowledge, critical analysis, and problem solving ability in appropriate diagnosis and management of those conditions amenable to optometric management. You will be assessed through quizzes, slide tests, and a final examination, specifically through MCQ, short-answer questions, and scenario-based assessment in the written exam. You will also be assessed from your answers and participation in practical classes.

    Capability and motivation for intellectual development

    3

    You will be left to develop your understanding of basic science and how it underpins the clinical picture as seen in practice by the optometrist. You are expected to integrate learning from the readings and the course content and start to gain an appreciation of the relevance of ocular diseases to public health. This will be assessed through your involvement and the depth of understanding and critical analysis demonstrated in practicals.

    Ethical, social and professional understanding

    2

    Professional understanding is of primary importance for the successful management of ocular diseases. You will develop an awareness of the role of optometry in the co-management of disease with other health professionals from readings, and discussion, and presentation of clinical cases in practicals.

    Communication

    2

    Effective and appropriate communication to both the patient other health professionals is pivotal for successful management for ocular diseases.

    2 UNSW Handbook: http://www.handbook.unsw.edu.au

    3 Learning and Teaching Unit: Course Outlines

    4 Learning and Teaching Unit: Learning Outcomes

    5 Contextualised Science Graduate Attributes: http://www.science.unsw.edu.au/our-faculty/science-graduate-attributes

    http://www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/http://teaching.unsw.edu.au/course-outlinehttp://teaching.unsw.edu.au/constructing-learning-outcomeshttp://www.science.unsw.edu.au/our-faculty/science-graduate-attributes

  • 4

    You will develop competence in effectively communicating to patients and other health professions for co-management of diseases from readings, discussions, and presentation of clinical cases in practicals.

    Teamwork, collaborative and management skills

    2

    In practical classes, you will form groups of 3 or 4 and be required to work collaboratively in developing your information literacy, case analysis, and presentation skills. This includes reviewing and discussing key papers, and presenting, in the given time, group conclusions to the class.

    Information literacy

    3

    This course requires sourcing of the best evidence available in disease diagnosis and management. This requires developing skills in sourcing information via on-line resources, published journals, and discussion with peers and lecturers. Information literacy will be evidenced through case analyses, slide test questions, and long essay questions in the final examination. Proficiency with English is expected and assessable throughout the program as this is a competency required (and necessary) in any area of optometry employment in Australia.

    Major Topics (Syllabus Outline)

    Diagnosis and management of diseases of the lids, lacrimal system, orbit, conjunctiva, cornea, episclera, sclera, anterior uvea, vitreous, and lens.

    Relationship to Other Courses within the Program

    Optometry has a central role in the detection and management of ocular disease in the community, and more recently in the treatment of some ocular diseases. This course is a key part of the overall Optometry program and is an essential pre-requisite to Ocular Therapeutics. The management of ocular diseases is a core component of primary eye care and of optometric practice. Ocular Diseases also links with Physiology, Pharmacology and Optometry, Medicine, and Patient Management and forms an important basis for Clinical Optometry.

    4. Rationale and Strategies Underpinning the Course

    Teaching Strategies

    The course consists of a 12 week program delivered internally through three one or two-hour compulsory lectures each week, and three two-hour practicals. The Teaching Strategies are the ways in which the Learning Outcomes will be achieved. To maximise learning effectiveness, a number of strategies are used in this course to encourage critical thinking and deep learning of the topics and issues. This course consists of a combination of didactic, group tutorials and self-directed home study. Throughout this course we will use:

    the course content to develop clinical diagnostic strategies

    practical classes and case examples to develop your ability to source and select relevant, recent, evidence-based literature on the internet

    class discussions to develop your ability to critically review the literature and your knowledge of seminal Ocular Diseases papers

    MCQ questions to continuously evaluate your differential diagnosis skills

    invited lecturers to develop multi-disciplinary management strategies and discuss broader issues relating to disability, public health, and co-management

    The Moodle component of this course provides access to course notes, compulsory and optional readings, useful on-line resources, additional case reports and a venue for optional student on-line discussions.

    Rationale for learning and teaching in this course

    6,7

    This course is intended to facilitate the development of skills in problem solving, clinical management, examination, and diagnosis. Teaching and learning strategies will encourage students to use their knowledge to construct abstract concepts when detecting and diagnosing ocular disease. Students will use fuzzy clinical data to test alternate hypotheses in differential diagnosis. Students will be encouraged to have a holistic position and to consider the patient rather than the disease. The practicals aim to stimulate a more active learning process and encourage deeper level of critical analysis whereby students discuss their understanding of seminal papers in small group format with staff taking on the role of facilitators of learning.

    6Reflecting on your teaching

    http://teaching.unsw.edu.au/practice

  • 5

    5. Course Schedule Some of this information is available on the Online Handbook

    7 and the UNSW Timetable

    8.

    Week Lectures (Monday), 11-12 pm, RMT

    Lectures (Tuesday), 11-1 pm, RMT

    Lectures (Wednesday), 2-4 pm, RMT (Wed 22

    nd April OMB G31)

    Practicals, OMB LG21 Group 1: Mon 9- 11am; Group 2: Thu 4 - 6pm; Group 3: Tue 2 - 4pm; Group 4: Wed 9- 11am; Group 5: Wed 12- 2pm.

    Assignment and Submission dates (see also 'Assessment Tasks & Feedback')

    Week 1: 2 6th March NO ACTIVITIES

    Week 2 9 13

    th March

    Intro-Ocular Disease 3A; Infection or Inflammation?

    Ocular Adnexa Ocular Adnexa

    Week 3 16 20

    th March

    Self-Directed Learning

    Inflam/Eyelids/Lashes Corneal Infections Prof Stapleton

    Self-Directed Learning

    Orbital Disorders

    Week 4 23 27

    th March

    Conjunctiva Dr Pauline Kang

    Conjunctiva (cont.) Dr Pauline Kang

    Self-Directed Learning Orbital Disorders

    Week 5 30

    th March 2

    rd April

    Self-Directed Learning Conjuctiva

    Self-Directed Learning Intro Cornea Disorders

    Corneal Dystrophies Dr Maria Markoulli

    MID-SEMESTER BREAK

    Week 6 13 17

    th April

    Anterior Eye Trauma Dr Athena Rufous

    Orbital Disorders/Orbital Tumours A/Prof Michele Madigan

    Cornea Peripheral

    Practical 1 All groups

    Practical: Immediate submission. Verbal & online feedback, marks

    Week 7 20 24

    th April

    Self-Directed Learning Orbital disorders

    Cornea Ectasia MCQ test Cornea Viral

    MCQ test: immediate submission. Verbal and online feedback, marks

    Week 8 27 1

    st May

    Self-Directed Learning Cornea (1)

    Lens & Cataract Congenital and Other Cataracts

    Practical 2 All groups

    Practical: Immediate submission. Verbal & online feedback, marks

    Week 9 4 8

    th May

    Self-Directed Learning Developmental Disorders

    Sclera Corneal and Cataract Surgery TBC

    Week 10 11 15

    th May

    Self-Directed Learning

    Sclera/lens/cataract Lacrimal System Dry Eye Disease

    Week 11 18 22

    nd May

    Self-Directed Learning Lacrimal/dry eye

    Iris and Ciliary Body; Anterior Uveitis

    Anterior/Intermediate Uveitis Practical 3 All groups

    Practical: Immediate submission. Verbal & online feedback, marks

    Week 12 25 29

    th May

    Vitreous A/Prof Michele Madigan

    Vitreous/Anterior Eye Tumours and Others A/Prof Michele Madigan

    Anterior Eye Tumours and Others A/Prof Michele Madigan

    Week 13 1 5

    th June

    Self-Directed Learning Iris/ciliary/Ant uveitis

    Red Eye Revision

    7 UNSW Virtual Handbook: http://www.handbook.unsw.edu.au

    8 UNSW Timetable: http://www.timetable.unsw.edu.au/

    http://www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/http://www.timetable.unsw.edu.au/http://www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/http://www.timetable.unsw.edu.au/

  • 6

    6. Assessment Tasks and Feedback10

    Task

    Knowledge & abilities assessed

    Assessment Criteria

    % of total mark

    Date of

    Feedback

    Release

    Submission

    WHO

    WHEN

    HOW

    Practicals

    Information literacy, research, inquiry, and analytical thinking, critical analysis, communication skills (verbal or written), teamwork

    Participation, ability to source literature, clarity, succinctness, appropriateness and accuracy of answers (verbal or written)

    20%

    Weeks 6, 8 and 11

    Immediate

    J. Ozkan

    2 weeks after

    Verbal, on-line feedback marks

    MC...

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