Scaffolded Ice Age Lesson for English Language Learners

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Scaffolded Ice Age Lesson for English Language Learners. June 12, 2012 FL CCSS Institute Diane Staehr Fenner, Ph.D. Goals of This Session. A n alyze the language demands of portions of this unit to allow ELLs to access its content - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Scaffolded Ice Age Lesson for English Language Learners

June 12, 2012FL CCSS InstituteDiane Staehr Fenner, Ph.D.

Goals of This SessionAnalyze the language demands of portions of this unit to allow ELLs to access its content

Model scaffolding strategies and examples for ELLs to give them support in completing this unit, including:1) Building background knowledge2) Developing language and literacy skills in the context of content instruction (content and language objectives)3) Using first language knowledge and skills as appropriate4) Pre-teaching academic and domain-specific vocabulary5) Instructing ELLs in vocabulary learning strategies 6) Engaging ELLs before, during, and after reading22Scaffolding Content Instruction for ELLsPlan content and language objectivesAnalyze academic language of text Use targeted ELL scaffolding strategies to differentiate for instruction at different levels of English language proficiency

3CCSS Addressed by the Scaffolded Ice Age UnitCCSS:Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of science and technical texts Distinguish among facts, reasoned judgment based on research findings, and speculation in a textGrade level: 84Building Background Knowledge for ELLsThis Not This

5Handout pg. 1

Build background knowledge related to the text through short video clips, visuals, readings and questions that draw on students background knowledge related to the text. (Adapted from slide 18 of August ppt - Lincolns Gettysburg Address)These same resources can be used as periodic informal assessments. (I added this line)

5Developing Language/Literacy and Content Simultaneously Content Objective Language Objective Students will use academic language of cause and effect to discuss and write 3 5 events that may cause global warming using domain-specific and content vocabulary Students will demonstrate understanding of causes and effects of global warming 6Handout pg. 26Defining Features of Academic LanguageAcademic language is language that stands in contrast to the everyday informal speech that students use outside the classroom environmentHow it differs from social English Discourse level: Discourse complexity quantity and variety of oral and written textSentence level: Language forms and conventions types, array, and use of language structuresWord/phrase level: Vocabulary usage specificity of word or phrase choiceDefining features of academic language all operate within a sociocultural context for language use

World-Class Instructional Design and Assessment (WIDA), 2011

7World-Class Instructional Design and Assessment (WIDA) advances academic language development and academic achievement for linguistically diverse students through high quality standards, assessments, research, and professional development for educators. The WIDA consortium is a non-profit cooperative group whose purpose is to develop standards and assessments that meet and exceed the goals of No Child Left Behind (NCLB) and promote educational equity for English language learners. There are currently 27 member states. In addition, three states have adopted the WIDA English language proficiency standards but do not participate in other Consortium activities. Providing ELLs access to complex content area text includes analyzing the following components of text and targeting instruction accordingly: Sociocultural Context Discourse/Organization Grammar/SyntaxAcademic Vocabulary 8Keep these components in mind as we read through the following text 8Challenges Ice Age Text Presents to ELLsDiscourse/OrganizationGrammar (Language Forms & Conventions)Vocabulary UsageSociocultural Context9Well use this framework to analyze four areas in which ELLs could face linguistic and cultural challenges with complex text. What Thawed the Last Ice Age?

By David Biello Wednesday, April 4, 2012Roughly 20,000 years ago the great ice sheets that buried much of Asia, Europe and North America stopped their creeping advance. Within a few hundred years sea levels in some places had risen by as much as 10 metersmore than if the ice sheet that still covers Greenland were to melt today. This freshwater flood filled the North Atlantic and also shut down the ocean currents that conveyed warmer water from equatorial regions northward. The equatorial heat warmed the precincts of Antarctica in the Southern Hemisphere instead, shrinking the fringing sea ice and changing the circumpolar winds. As a resultand for reasons that remain unexplainedthe waters of the Southern Ocean may have begun to release carbon dioxide, enough to raise concentrations in the atmosphere by more than 100 parts per million over millenniaroughly equivalent to the rise in the last 200 years. That CO2 then warmed the globe, melting back the continental ice sheets and ushering in the current climate that enabled humanity to thrive. 10Paragraph 110What Thawed the Last Ice Age? ContinuedThat, at least, is the story told by a new paper published in Nature on April 5 that reconstructs the end of the last ice age. Researchers examined sediment cores collected from deep beneath the sea and from lakes as well as the tiny bubbles of ancient air trapped inside ice cores taken from Antarctica, Greenland and elsewhere. (Scientific American is part of Nature Publishing Group.) The research suggests thatcontrary to some prior findingsCO2 led the prior round of global warming rather than vice versa, just as it continues to do today thanks to rising emissions of CO2 and other greenhouse gases.

11Paragraph 211Using First Language Knowledge and Skills as AppropriateAproximadamente hace 20.000 aos las grandes capas de hielo que enterraron gran parte de Asia, Europa y Amrica del Norte detuvieron su avance progresivo. Desde hace pocos cientos de aos ha aumentado el nivel del mar en algunos lugares tanto como 10 metros, ms que si la capa de hielo que an cubre Groenlandia fueron derretir hoy. Esta inundacin de agua dulce llena el Atlntico Norte y tambin apaga las corrientes ocenicas que transmiten agua clida desde el norte de las regiones ecuatoriales. 12Pre-Teaching Academic and Domain-Specific VocabularyAcademic VocabularyScience Concepts/Vocab Time/ Measurement Vocab for reasons that remain unexplained todayIce sheet

millennia

as a result

carbon dioxide/CO2ancientroughly equivalent tosediment cores today/moderncontrary toice cores

20,000 years ago to 10,000 years ago13Handout pg. 413Instructing ELLs in Vocabulary Learning Strategies: Use of Cognates Paragraph 2That, at least, is the story told by a new paper published in Nature on April 5 that reconstructs the end of the last ice age. Researchers examined sediment cores collected from deep beneath the sea and from lakes as well as the tiny bubbles of ancient air trapped inside ice cores taken from Antarctica, Greenland and elsewhere. (Scientific American is part of Nature Publishing Group.) The research suggests thatcontrary to some prior findingsCO2 led the prior round of global warming rather than vice versa, just as it continues to do today thanks to rising emissions of CO2 and other greenhouse gases. 14Handout pg. 514Use of Cognates to Access TextEnglish WordSpanish Wordpublishedpublicado April Abril reconstructsreconstruyeexaminedexaminaronsedimentsedimentoairaireAntarcticaLa AntrtidaGreenlandGroenlandiasuggestssugiereCarbon dixiode CO2dixido de carbonoroundrondaglobal globalvice versaviceversacontinuescontina emissionslas emisiones degasesgases 15Engaging ELLs Before, During, and After ReadingBefore ReadingBuilding background knowledgePredicting content of text with scaffoldsPre-teaching vocabulary and idiomatic expressions

During reading Teacher read-aloud of textStudent independent reading of textStudent translation of text into own words (with partner)Teacher guided discussion (with different questions and scaffolding)

After Reading Focus on both oral language and writing developmentUse of first language as appropriateLevel of scaffolding aligned with students levels of English language proficiency with reductions in scaffolding as students become more proficient in English

16Handout pg. 6Adapted from August ppt. slides 29 & 33 16Self-Assessment In what ways can you continue toBuild ELLs background knowledge?Develop language and literacy skills in the context of content instruction?Use first language knowledge and skills appropriately?Pre-teach academic and domain-specific vocabulary?Instruct ELLs in vocabulary learning strategies? Engage ELLs before, during, and after reading?Find resources to support all of the above? 1717Selected Resources Freeman Field, R. (2012). Focus on differentiation. Madison, WI: WIDA. Retrieved from http://wida.us/resources/ Gottlieb, M., Katz, A., & Ernst-Slavit, G. (2009). Paper to Practice: Using the TESOL English Language Proficiency standards in PreK-12 classrooms. Alexandria, VA: TESOL. Himmel, J. (2012). Language objectives: The key to effective content area instruction for English Learners. Washington, DC: Colorin Colorado. Retrieved from http://www.colorincolorado.org/article/49646/ Zwiers, J. (2008). Building academic language: Essential practices for content classrooms. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

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