Robert Baden-Powell, 1931 in Girl Guiding - guiding downloaded from: ... 2 . girl guiding ... guiders by lord baden-powell of gilwell author of “scouting for boys,â€‌ “adventuring

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Text of Robert Baden-Powell, 1931 in Girl Guiding - guiding downloaded from: ... 2 . girl guiding ......

  • GIRL GUIDING

    1

  • GIRL GUIDING

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  • GIRL GUIDING

    GIRL GUIDING A HANDBOOK FOR BROWNIES,

    GUIDES, RANGERS, AND GUIDERS

    BY

    LORD BADEN-POWELL OF GILWELL AUTHOR OF SCOUTING FOR BOYS,

    ADVENTURING TO MANHOOD, AFRICAN ADVENTURES, ETC.

    Reprint of 1938 edition as last revised by Lord Baden-Powell himself1961

    C. ARTHUR PEARSON, LTD. Tower House,

    Southampton Street, Strand, London, W.C.2.

    DEDICATED

    BY GRACIOUS PERMISSION TO

    HER ROYAL HIGHNESS THE PRINCESS ROYAL

    PRESIDENT OF THE GIRL GUIDES

    First published 1918

    Revised by the author and reprinted 1918-1938

    Made and Printed in Great Britain by C. Tinling & Co. Ltd. Liverpool, London and Prescot.

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  • GIRL GUIDING

    CONTENTS

    PAGE

    FOREWORD 5

    EXPLANATION: Girl Guiding. What it means. 6

    BROWNIES

    CHAPTER I. The Story of the Brownies 7

    II. The Recruit Brownie 10

    III. The Second Class Brownie 16

    IV. The First Class Brownie 24

    V. Proficiency Badges for Brownies 30

    GUIDES

    VI. How to Become a Tenderfoot 33

    VII. The Second Class Guide 59

    VIII. How to Become a First Class Guide 85

    RANGERS AND CADETS

    IX. Rangers 115

    GUIDERS

    X. What is Girl Guiding? 122

    Index not included in this e-edition

    PUBLISHERS NOTE

    Girl Guiding was first published in 1918 as the official handbook of the Girl Guides Association. It was revised by the Founder, Lord Baden-Powell, from time to time and the last edition that he personally supervised was that of 1938, of which this book is a reproduction. The syllabus contained herein is that which was in force at the time.

    The official Handbook of the Association containing the syllabus of tests in current use is now Be Prepared, by Agnes Maynard.

    Tests have naturally been changed during the half-century since the foundation of the Movement but basic principles have remained the same and it is for this reason that the present volume has been published.

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  • GIRL GUIDING

    FOREWORD

    SINCE the first edition of Girl Guiding a whole lot of Thames has flowed under the bridges. For one thing there has been the Great War. Incidentally the War, in spite of all its evils, did one great good. It gave women their opportunity for

    showing their pluck and intelligence and their capability for taking on tasks which so far had been considered beyond their powers. They rose to the situation and ably served their country in the time of its need.

    Thus they placed themselves in a new light, on a new plane in the social order, which is all the more important seeing that in Great Britain they outnumber the men by two millions, and also form the majority of voters in Parliament, thus constituting a new and very considerable power in the land.

    It is up to them, and they have the opportunity now, to carry the service they gave to the country in the time of war into the wider field which has opened to them for developing peace and prosperity in the direction of the development of character and unselfish patriotism.

    This sounds easy, but in these days when the Press, wireless and cinematograph films are all to the fore with their mass suggestion, and there are ever-increasing facilities for unprofitable pleasure, it is not so easy as it sounds.

    It has been said that forty per cent. of women act on impulse rather than on reflection, and impulse does not always carry you in the right direction.

    There seems considerable impulse to-day for women to seek notoriety, whether it be as lawn tennis or cinema stars, athletes, fliers, golfers, Channel swimmers, or polo players all of whom are very dashing and plucky but show a splendid energy misdirected and wasted.

    Whereas, with a real training in individual character to repress herd impulse and recognize the opportunities of service for their country, these same girls can form an army of patriotic women such as has never been seen before, and which can help to pull our old country and indeed our whole commonwealth out of the mud and ruin on to the fairway to prosperity and happiness.

    There is another point. I cannot sufficiently emphasize the importance of Nature lore and its essential place in our programme. There may be a tendency, especially in towns and during the long winter months, to attach in its stead too great a value to signalling and drill, etc.

    But our aim is CHARACTER DEVELOPMENT TOWARDS HAPPY CITIZENSHIP

    through natural rather than through artificial means. We have to keep that ever before us.

    The imposition of formal exercises and discipline from without is exactly the reverse of our principle of encouraging energy and self-discipline from within.

    And the love of Nature properly aroused and properly directed can, with its sermons in stones and stories in the running brooks, show the good in everything.

    Through the Guide movement we are able to offer such training and furthermore, our sisterhood has, since the War, grown up in other countries abroad and bids fair to become a great international sisterhood of women of all nations under a common ideal of mutual goodwill and understanding. This cannot fail to have, in conjunction with the Boy Scout brotherhood, an important influence on the future peace of the world.

    Founder. 1931

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  • GIRL GUIDING

    EXPLANATION

    Girl Guiding has a double meaning. To some it means the fun of playing the games of the Girl Guides; to others, the fun of playing the game in Guiding Girls. Our desire in producing this Guide scheme is to offer help to parents, teachers and patriots who may care to avail themselves of it when it comes to the duty of training girls.

    The object of the Guide training is to give our girls, whatever may be their circumstances, a series of healthy and jolly activities which, while delighting them, will afford them a course of education outside the school in four particular lines of which there is the greatest need:

    1. CHARACTER AND INTELLIGENCE, through games, practices and activities, and honours and tests for promotion.

    2. SKILL AND HANDCRAFT, encouraged through badges for proficiency. 3. PHYSICAL HEALTH and HYGIENE, through development up to standard by games and exercises

    designed for the purpose. 4. SERVICE FOR OTHERS and FELLOWSHIP, through daily good turns, organised public service,

    etc.

    I have ventured to describe the above as a course of education instead of a course of instruction since the girls are led to learn of their own desire which is education instead of having the knowledge impressed upon them from outside which is instruction.

    The Guides are divided into four grades, to each of which a corresponding part of this book applies: PART I. Brownies, under 11 PART II. Guides, 11 to 16. PART III. Rangers, over 16. PART IV. Guiders, 18 to 81.

    The latter are what would otherwise be termed officers, but their position is rather that of elder sisters reviving their youth by playing among and leading the girls than of officers ordering them about, or repressing them.

    In each grade the training runs on the same four lines as that shown in the preceding paragraph, but on relatively higher standards at each stage, according to the psychology of the girl concerned in it.

    Experience has shown that the scheme is easily applicable, even by untrained leaders, to all kinds of girls, whether in town or country, at home or overseas; and that it is capable of bringing about most satisfactory results.

    This book merely offers an outline of principles, together with a few samples of details as an indication to Guiders of the lines on which they can carry out the training. Further details are largely left to their own ingenuity to devise, according to the condition and character of their girls and of their surroundings.

    In any case the programme of the training should be kept as unlike a school syllabus as possible in order to give it novelty and freshness.

    The book is worded in such a way that it can be studied by the girls themselves in the different grades. The paragraphs in italics are more particularly addressed to the Guiders. In conjunction with this book the Book of Rules of the Association should be read, and where there may be any difference in detail between the two the Book of Rules should be taken as the guide, being more frequently under revision and, therefore, up to date; and also the month paper THE GUIDER.

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  • GIRL GUIDING

    For further suggestions on the work of Guiders and their aims and methods see Part IV. Perhaps the most important suggestion that I can offer here to Guiders may be summed up in the motto:

    Laugh while you work,

    Founder.

    January 1918

    GIRL GUIDE IMPERIAL HEADQUARTERS, 76 VICTORIA STREET, LONDON, S.W.1.

    CHAPTER 1

    THE STORY OF THE BROWNIES (Adapted from The Brownies, by Mrs. Ew